29

On just about every piano, studio (upright) or grand, the right hand pedal (?!) moves the felt dampers away from all the strings. This allows all strings to vibrate in sympathy when a note relating to them is played. Press pedal, play G - other G strings will also sound, giving a richer sound, which will sustain longer. Hence sustain or damper pedal. The ...


28

Playing a chord lifts the dampers from just the strings of the notes played. Depressing the pedal lifts the dampers from ALL the strings. A lot more resonance. I'm amazed that you can't hear the difference! Maybe you aren't playing a real piano, but a basic-grade electronic imitation that doesn't model this important part of the piano sound?


14

The sustain (damper) pedal on a studio piano pushes a rod which connects to the lever which connects to the dampers. This is adjustable with a screw, to allow the dampers to rest on the strings (apart from the top octave or so) with the correct pressure, when the pedal is at rest. It sounds like the dampers are not pressing enough. It won't be a feature, and ...


13

Roland FP-80 Connectors section at Specifications tab contains the following: PEDAL (DAMPER/R, SOFT/L *, SOSTENUTO/C *) So I'll presume, that those are the pedals required for the answer. As stated at Piano pedals article on Wikipedia: Modern pianos usually have three pedals, from left to right, the soft pedal (or una corda), the sostenuto pedal (...


13

No. A sustain pedal is a simple switch with a piece of cable attached that the keyboard uses to emulate the function of the sustain pedal on the piano - which basically means "let ring the notes when the pedal is depressed even if you lift your fingers off the keys". A sustainer pedal is a compressor, which is a thing that that limits the dynamic range of ...


12

You rarely need it, but when you do, it's indispensable! A few examples come to mind: Claude Debussy: Clair de Lune. Second page, Tempo rubato. The left hand needs to hold some low octaves, then jump up to play some chords above middle C. Considering that it's Impressionistic music, and the dynamic marking is pp, you might be able to fudge it with the ...


11

orthodox: adherence to accepted norms Is playing Bach like Glenn Gould orthodox or not? Some will swear by what he does with Bach and probably say yes, while others will cry out loud "Nooooooo"! I think answering your question about using the pedal with Bach faces the same dilemma: since Bach isn't there to tell you what he would like to have heard when ...


11

I would differ from Wheat Williams’ answer. The sustain pedal is essential. A variable-resistance sustain pedal, often marketed as “half-damper”, will also make a world of difference: non-variable-resistance have an entirely different feel, and your son starts on those, then he will have to largely re-learn his sustain pedal usage when he gets to a real ...


11

Historically, one usage of this symbol was to indicate "rhythmic" pedaling. For example, that open circle notation is shown and described on pp. 160-162 of Pedaling the Piano: A Brief Survey from the Eighteenth Century to the Present: A change in harmony made it "necessary to damp the preceding chord" and to take a new pedal on the following chord, as ...


9

I would say the more recent the music, the more often it's notated (at least in classical music). In modern music it is very common but it was used already at least by Beethoven. For example, in the 4th concerto, you can find all of una, due, and tre corde in the second movement. Liszt certainly used it; check the beginning of the Liebesträume, for example. ...


8

There's one sostenuto pedal marking in Bartók's 3rd piano concerto, measure 75. It's in a slightly small type, though, so it might be added by an editor. I don't recall any markings from earlier composers but you'll find them in modern literature. There are many examples in Ligeti's etudes, like in L'escalier du diable, measure 26. As a side note, Bartók's ...


8

As Indrek pointed out, this gives at least partial answers to your questions. In short, the answer to who first put foot pedals on a piano is not known exactly, but the practice seems to originate in England. A piano of Americus Backers from 1772 might be the first one to use foot pedals instead of knee levers. Then you have a different question in the ...


8

I think it's better to hold the note. Using a sustain pedal would also sustain the notes in the bass as well as the upper treble notes. It's difficult to sustain only the single note, even using the sostenuto pedal (which would normally sustain the first D chord in measure 9.)


8

For almost all pianos: right pedal = sustaining or damper pedal. The dampers are disabled so all strings you hit will continue resonating until you lift your foot from that pedal. left pedal = una corda or soft pedal. It will allow you to play softly. On grand pianos, this works by shifting the keyboard so that the hammers hit one (hence "una corda") or ...


8

This line refers to the pedal: You are holding the pedal down before, at the triangle you release it and hold it down again for this bar. So, you can use the pedal to hold down the notes you cannot stretch your fingers for.


7

It really depends on the genre you are playing. I'll go through two with you. "Classical": In many books the pedal points are notated. If they are not notated then it depends on the period that the song was written in. I titled this section "classical" because that's what people usually think when they hear Bach and Beethoven. The proper term is "Western ...


7

In an upright piano the left pedal (fake una corda) functions by pushing all the hammers closer to the strings. Shortening the hammer travel distance makes the notes play a bit softer. The hammers, in rest position, lie back on the "hammer rest rail", and when you push the left pedal there is a rod that travels up the left side of the piano from the pedal to ...


7

Sorry, just randomly came across this question here, and I know the question is a year old, but the given answer is not correct in this case and I happen to know a specific answer to your question. Enescu invented several symbols for use in his music, and this is one of them. It is meant to indicate momentary half damping. Basically you change the pedal ...


7

There is sometimes a middle pedal on pianos, called the sostenuto pedal. Its role is to hold only the notes played when it's operated. so here, using that sostenuto pedal, the three semibreves can be held with it, which doesn't affect the other notes. Using the sustain pedal, found on all pianos, will obviously hold the long notes without having to hold ...


6

It is "bad" for the piano in that a piano is not designed to have the una corda pedal (that's the "soft pedal") stomped on. The danger here is that by stomping, you can damage the mechanism that moves all of the hammers over, thereby breaking the instrument. On upright pianos the una corda pedal is replaced with a practice pedal in which a felt curtain is ...


6

This is probably caused by at least one of these things: The damper pedal is slightly out of regulation, and is holding the dampers slightly off the strings. (Easy fix) The dampers are old and tired and don't dampen as well as they used to. (Expensive to replace) The dampers are under-built: actually too small for the length of the piano strings, usually ...


6

TL;DR If I were you, I would care only about the sustain, and made sure the piano and the pedal support more than just on and off states. Surely, if your son keeps practicing there will be a time when the other pedals will start to make a difference. However, you should think then about getting an acoustic piano. The three main pedals of the piano are: ...


6

This is one of those things that makes Debussy really hard, and not really appropriate for a beginner despite the slow tempo. Debussy was an excellent pianist, and it seems that he leaned on his ability as a performer and didn't worry about the notation that much. His piano music is full of places where what's written doesn't match what he intended (we ...


6

Sometimes when accompanying an unamplified singer I put my foot on the soft pedal and leave it there. This allows me to play with a little more verve without overwhelming the voice. In an ideal world I might reposition the piano, or drape it with something. But this isn't an ideal world...


6

One of the most distinctive features of the piano (as opposed to e.g. the harpsichord or the clavichord) is the sympathetic resonance. Whenever you hit one string, all the strings sympathetic to that one (*) will vibrate along with it. Usually the dampers get rid of this resonance immediately, but holding down the damper pedal lets it shine through. Try ...


5

There is no rule requiring you to use the sostenuto pedal only for notes that have already sounded. In a composition that works as you described, capturing them in advance is a perfectly fine and obvious solution. (In fact, modern compositions sometimes use silent keypresses and the sostenuto pedal for notes that are never sounded, just made to resonate by ...


5

For the mechanisms I'm aware of for quieting a pedal, no, there is no risk of damage to the hammer or strings and no reason in general to not hold the pedal down. With a true una corda pedal, the entire action of the piano is moved slightly to one side, so the hammers don't strike all the strings or they strike the single strings a more glancing blow. The ...


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