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2

Deliberately changing pedal before a new phrase can sometimes result in something not entirely dissimilar to when a choir collectively breathes before a barline - e.g., it can easily create a somewhat stilted/mechanical effect. I'd guess the written pedal marks are an attempt (presumably by an editor and not Chopin) to avoid that to some degree, though my ...


2

Up-down as each chord is played. A subtle lift at the end of each phrase is not a ridiculous idea, but I don't think it's needed here. Rubinstein legato-pedals through. So do all the other YouTube versions I just looked at. That's good enough for me.


2

The usual way is to hold the pedal down to sustain one chord, then play the next, and after that next has been played, change pedal. Rather like the sign shows - the 'pedal up/down' comes directly after the next chord is played, not before or as it's played. Slowing it all down a lot will allow understanding of the actual timing - it's an aquired art ! By ...


6

Ultimately, this is a musical decision, so either way is fine. However,... If you want to play the music literally as written, then you would hold the pedal through, so that there's no break between the two slurred passages. My personal preference, both in this simplified arrangement as well as the original, is to leave a small break — a "breath" — ...


2

Take the front panel off and look at the dampers as you depress the pedal. It seems that the ones at the treble end are lifting fully away from the strings, the ones at the bass end are not. Maybe the entire action can be aligned better by following @MrNiver632's suggestion above. Maybe the pedal effect can be increased by adjusting a nut on the screwed ...


2

I had this problem before with my piano, which is very old and sustained the notes way too long, as well as the sustain varying across the keys. The mechanism in which the hammers are attached to is attached to the soundboard at the back of the piano case, usually using a big knob that can turn. Although I'm not sure whether it is like this on other pianos, ...


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