55

The main point of weighted keys are that they give more feel for the dynamic response of a piano-like instrument. Specifically, weighted keys make it so that gentle playing only results in gentle velo, i.e. low dynamic level. To play forte on a weighted keyboard, you literally need to put in some force, and that makes sense for the performance. With an ...


39

A so-called "tracker action" organ keyboard, where there is a direct mechanical connection between the key and the valve that lets air into the pipes to play the notes, has a very distinctive feel that is completely different from a piano "hammer action" and from the "dead" feel of a cheap spring-loaded keyboard. The force to start pressing the key down is ...


30

A piano doesn't have weighted keys to "feel premium", but because the hammer is part of how the piano works. The hammer isn't part of how an organ works, so it doesn't have weighted keys. the general consensus is people consider weighted keys to feel more "premium" If you're talking about a keyboard to trigger a piano or piano-like sound, there's ...


27

Partly to allow the same, diatonic, piece to be played at different pitches as @Tim suggests. But also, I think, because music started getting more tonally adventurous within the SAME piece. When you start wanting to visit (say) the mediant key as well as just the dominant and subdominant, equal temperament is a must.


17

Some people seem to make the case that having some keys beat more than others (as is in the case in the older well-tempered tuning systems) is a feature not a bug. Yes, but I don't think that was ever a major consideration. Originally, all tuning systems just tried to give good approximation to just intonation (JI). At first just for a few neighbouring ...


16

Simply so that any music could be played in any key and it would sound the same. Problem with tuning to another temperament means that pieces sounded particularly good in some keys, and particularly bad in others. And re-tuning often isn't a quick answer - especially on instruments such as piano! Non-fretted stringed instruments, such as violins, trombones ...


5

There IS software that claims to generate MIDI from audio input. 'Imperfect' would be too kind :-) Use a keyboard that DOES have a MIDI output. Life's too short to do it the hard way.


4

Your premise is incorrect. The Johannus One fits your criteria. Hauptwerk is an organ sampler that can be driven by any MIDI keyboard. Organteq is a VST plugin.


2

As a temperament junkie, I'd just like to humbly add to all the answers above that one way of looking at it is in terms of thirds and fifths: temperaments in Western music tend to be thirdier or fifthier. 12TET is almost as fifthy as it gets, two cents short of just is pretty good and a lucky coincidence of mathematics- but the thirds are pretty far off. 1/...


2

Inventions is a title that Bach uses in his foreword to the collection of this work. It is adapted from the theory of rhetoric. The inventions used by Bach means clearly that he first shows an invented motif and develops of this simple figure an entire (but short) composition: "Straightforward Instruction, in which amateurs of the keyboard, and especially ...


2

The previous answers thoroughly cover the differences in organ vs. piano mechanics, but I'll add one small point of consideration when discussing modern electronic keyboards and the pros/cons of (what I learned to call) "weighted" vs. "synth" action designs. While weighted keys would likely be preferable to anyone accustomed to playing a "real" piano, they ...


2

Organs are not "expressive" keyboard instruments. In other words the volume of a key press on an organ isn't dependent on how hard you press the key like it is on a piano. Organ keys are only "on" or "off". Volume is controlled separately (usually by a pedal or other control) and all keys will have the same volume based on that setting. Key weighting on ...


1

Organs don't have weighted keys because of two facts. First, weighted keys are supposed to make keyboards feel more like pianos. Second, organs were invented a thousand years or more before pianos. Organs and organists had centuries to develop ideal organ actions and playing techniques adapted to those actions before the piano began to be developed. ...


1

Weighted keys on an electric piano certainly are a selling point and cost more. But there is a practical reason. The weight provides some resistance and that resistance help you gauge how much velocity you put into the keys with your fingers. It sort of feels like an acoustic piano keyboard action, but it isn't the same mechanically, and in my opinion they ...


1

Apparently, running status does not work in your setup. This is a known bug of the CH345 chip, which is used mainly in cheap Chinese USB/MIDI interfaces like this:


1

Check out the Dexibell Vivo pianos which do allow you to download new samples. In general though, the samples in an electronic piano live in ROM and can't be changed easily, if at all.


1

According to Honegger-Massenkeil reference the first musical piece called invention was by Claude Janequin and dates from 1555. This weakens the strong Bach connection. There the title already described a piece not restricted by a specific scheme or formalism. From this kind of originality it is not far to the phrase that each piece is invented.


1

There are no absolutes when considering fingering on the piano. Everyone's anatomy is different, consequently their fingerings will differ too. Part of the point in practising playng is to work out for yourself which fingering works best for you as the player. There are not millions of combinations, and checking them methodically will be advantageous to ...


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