24

Yes, MIDI is primarily a communications protocol. But it also includes specifications for the General MIDI sound set. 128 sounds. Here they are, with their Program Change numbers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_MIDI#Piano It wasn't ALL that long ago that sound files were unmanageably large for sending over the internet. So a lot of music was ...


24

I don't know what keyboard that is, but that looks like the control for the ABC [Auto Bass Chord] system [That's a Yamaha term, other manufacturers may call it something else, but they all do a similar job]. Basically, it's a chord recognition mode. When set to Normal, the ABC system is off. Whatever notes you play, that's what you will hear. Fingered ...


15

When it comes to fingering questions, the broader the question the more the answer will be: "it depends." That is probably why you find conflicting information online, too many answers that don't provide the specific context for one fingering approach versus another. You can say that generally your fingers get placed about mid-way along the length ...


14

Yes, it's correct that there is a MIDI standard which relates to your question, but what you are talking about predates MIDI and has more to do with the history of sample-based keyboard instruments. The MIDI 1.0 Specification was published in 1985, but didn't include specific instrument voices like you are talking about, and was only an abstract ...


10

Well, if you mean Yamaha PSR-F51, you "feel like you don't know how to play the piano" because that is not an actual piano keyboard. A realistic piano keyboard is a weighted keyboard (which is what the P45 provides), as it imitates all the aspects of a real piano keyboard: feeling, weight and inertia. Some keyboards even have mechanics that are ...


9

For starters, it's no G♭ chord. As it states, it's D♭m7, with a G♭ bass note. Which means, assuming you're asking about the G in the bass clef (note on beat 2), it must be G♭, which means it's a typo. EDIT: just checked another sheet music, and the D♭m7 is beat 1, then beat 2 is G♭9. so it would appear - a. it's not a slash chord. b. the second chord is G♭9, ...


8

The Yamaha P-45 has weighted keys to make it feel more like playing an acoustic piano.1 They will feel heavy compared to the PSR-F51, which does not have weighted keys and so are very easy to press.2 1 The P-45 spec on the Yamaha website indicates "Graded hammer standard (GHS) keyboard", which means that the keys at the bass end of the keyboard ...


8

Answer is - it depends!. Since our fingers aren't all the same length, each will press down its individual note at a different point anyway. Thumb, being a couple of inches less reach than the middle finger, will usually press near the end of the key nearest to the player, while middle will generally press close to the black keys' ends. But - there are going ...


7

This is an interesting question. I'd refer to texts by Fletcher and Rossing on the subject as they are world leading experts in the physics of musical instruments. I can only tell you what I've learned from guitar playing, specifically classical guitar. You should know that the brightness of the note produced by the string depends on where you pluck it (I ...


7

According to this source there is a physical reason for where a piano wire is struck and the best location for plucking would be different: After many tests throughout the history of the piano, it was determined that the best strike point is between 1/7 and 1/8 the length of the string. In general, it can be verified that if the point where a string is ...


6

Spring action keyboards can be difficult for getting a good feel and dynamics. I looked at an online manual for your keyboard and found something that might help you. On page 52 of the manual there is a section called “Changing the touch response of the keyboard”. There are 4 settings but “fixed” is useless unless you want all the notes to be the same volume....


6

My understanding is that each string on a musical instrument/chordophone has a "sweet spot", such that when a string is activated at that point, the "best" sound is produced. As far as the violin goes your understanding is wrong. Putting to one side what is meant by "best", the three variables for violin playing are: Bow speed ...


6

It means 'continue right hand solo'. The RH solo starts at M.54 (notated) and at M.58 you continue improvising in a similar style. The arranger has written out the first four bars of the solo to give you an idea of the intended style and to give you some ideas to build on. There is normally no requirement to play those notes, you can play your own.


5

Look at this version of "Amazing Grace" from the Gather 3rd edition hymnal. It uses the same version of the melody as your sheet music. Link to image source


5

'Tr' means 'trill'. Play the note and the diatonic note above it alternately. As in DCDCDCDCD, quite fast, while the lower two notes are held only for the short quaver shown. I'd be playing it with two hands (left hand is doing nothing else), so E and G l.h., trill,r.h., whichever fingers you are better with - the suggestion here is 5434, but there are ...


4

You can take two approaches to this sort of problem, where the tune and the words aren't a good fit. You can take the tune as fixed and distort the words to suit it. Or you can modify the tune to suit the words. For the version of the tune you've shown us, and the traditional words, what's shown in @Edward's answer will be required. To suit the words, ...


4

Just answering a part of your question: I am under the impression that MIDI is a communication protocol for devices, not necessarily having to do with the sounds those devices make That is correct. Sort of. MIDI in its original form basically is a protocol that allows you to say, in a device-independent, abstract way: "Please, play note 43 with velocity ...


4

It sounds like you are mainly going to contribute to the band with vocals, but would also like to learn an instrument as another way to add to the music, if even just subtly at first. In that case I say keyboard. (This coming from a guitar player.) Since you are not approaching music to be a "(insert favorite instrument here)-player," and really ...


4

Not sure what a MIDI sustain pedal is, in comparison to most other sustain pedals. But most are simple switches, working in a similar way to a doorbell push. Press the pedal, contact made, release, contact lost. There are many effects pedals that will use an extra pedal such as this, to do all sorts of different things to that effects pedal, but on its own, ...


4

The important moment in understanding how to play this comes at the beginning of the chord(s). The below screenshot comes from the 0:43 second mark of the linked video in the OP. Note how the left hand first plays the B octave, then plays the [F# B D] chord. To do this, play the Bs first, and hold them with the sustain pedal, which is then kept held while ...


3

Much of the piece is straightforward, and the fingering reasonably intuitive. However, there are some sections to watch out for and some requiring license. mm. 3-4 These two measures require some wide leaps so may need extra practice for accuracy. mm. 13, 15, and 25 The problem in these three measures is that the hand-span is too large (for anyone who can't ...


3

This seems to be inspired by guitar pitch-shift pedals, the best known being the DigiTech Whammy. Those, in turn, were mostly a means of augmenting the mechanical pitch bend abilities that an electric guitar has (both the “whammy” vibrato arm and direct finger-bending of strings). The digital implementation has both larger range and avoids detuning problems, ...


3

It would be perfectly normal to use the built in styles while songwriting, in place of a full band or production. It is unusual to use built-in keyboard styles in finished arrangements, but there are exceptions, such as John Shuttleworth:


3

I’m far from an expert on copyright law but organ and keyboard accompaniments are usually fairly generic chords or arpeggios, bass lines and drum beats. Music copyright cases are almost always based on copying a melody although copying a portion of a recording or a very distinct groove can lead to a lawsuit too (1,000,000 rappers vs James Brown or I Want a ...


3

Yamaha keyboards of that type [PK/PSR etc] are usually painted plastic, certainly any metallic silver/grey sections - even the soft push-buttons. I don't know of any that are intentionally patterned like that - but it's been 20 years since I worked there. That looks to me like it's been sprayed or splashed with something that has actually damaged the paint ...


3

Hrmmm. As a guitarist, where I pick gives me control over expression. To some extent, pickup placement replaces it for electric instruments, but even then, picking close to the bridge has an effect. I'd say that over the soundhole is the "sweet spot", but seeing that it's fretted, that moves, but even then, the unsweet spots can still be pretty ...


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