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38

replete's answer is correct that the original reason was to have a bigger range, as needed for some organ music. However, I don't think that's the reason those Imperial models are so sought-for over all these years – actually playing the lowest notest is scarcely musically useful. The reason why people want Bösendorfer Imperial is that they sound awesome, ...


22

Without. Point blank. Lights look fun to start with, but a beginner will end up watching them rather than learning to read. Note, you can usually switch them off, so you don't have to choose a keyboard that doesn't have them. I have no recommendations on mobile teaching apps, I've never used them.


14

"KSP" means "Keyboard Stereo Panning", that means for these voices, the placement of the instrument changes in the stereo panorama, depending on the position on the keyboard. So, "low notes" come from "left", "middle notes" "from the middle" and "high notes" "from right" (viewed from the player). For the versions of the Voices WITHOUT "KSP", the position in ...


13

You are overthinking this. You are free to use whichever fingers you like when playing a piece but obviously some fingerings will work better than others. What you need to do is to find a fingering that works for you and then try to always do that. Your "muscle memory" will simply work when you have practiced enough. If you find a passage where there are ...


13

Don't bother with lights. The player will be forever chasing them. In fact, for a few weeks I recommend not trying to read dots either. Just get used to the instrument, what it can do, and have fun. I would hope that pound for pound, a keyboard without lights would have other, better features.Most will have speakers or a headphone port. Buying pre-loved ...


9

We try to find a good fingering - that might mean 'good for YOU' considering your hand size - and stick to it. Not because it's a 'rule', but because it's effecient! You don't want to be hunting for each note every time you play the piece! Let your hands learn where to go, then your playing can become fluent.


8

Yep. There's of course another reason than cannot be underestimated: bling.


6

TL;DR Extra knobs and buttons are not absolutely necessary, but then again a MIDI keyboard is not absolutely necessary either, because you can just use a mouse. But since you're buying a MIDI keyboard, you most likely want to make it easier to play virtual synthesizers, and for that purpose the extra knobs and buttons are very useful. Even something very ...


6

Its only my opinion, but my observations in the music store are such that they lead me to think the lights on these keyboards serve one purpose, to sell keyboards. I've never known any teachers that use them to teach with, and I've never met anyone that actually learned to play music that way, so in my opinion the lights are a sales gimmick but an effective ...


5

I suspect this is just a typo for "intavolatura." The Italian verb intavolare means to begin or commence. Musical intavolature were either "preludes" in the sense of the first piece in a collection, or sometimes "music tutors" - e.g. this on IMSLP for lute (warning, not much use except to show the title page, unless you can read Italian and lute tablature!) ...


5

There seems to be some confusion based on the comments under the question. The term keyboard in this case is a synthesizer, that means an instrument with lots of sounds, often several hundreds of sounds and lots of different styles for the rhythm box. On such a keyboard the "one finger chords" is a standard option. You start the drum machine and then you ...


4

I couldn't play the audio file, but comments say it's an acoustic guitar with the muting on the neck. If the piano was a grand and you could reach inside, you could brush your fingernail across the strings with the dampers down. That would sort of mechanically duplicate what's happening with the guitar. The sound would be similar. You wouldn't be able to ...


4

Obviously a grand piano, with sostenuto in the middle. Since the damper pedal is the most used on just about every piano (practice pedal on some gets used a lot but will be locked down), it appears that this damper pedal is a replacement for the original, which may have been damaged in transit rather than 'worn out'. It's not, unfortunately, a good match ...


4

Both are KEYBOARD instruments. I play a tracker organ, acoustic piano, electronic organ and electric piano every week for various jobs and I play them exactly the same, from the weight of my arm. Arm weight equalizes everything. On the organ I leave just enough weight to "rest up" yet sustain the tone but really, it is not much different than playing ...


4

There are several texts that are readable. One is available on IMSLP: https://imslp.org/wiki/Thorough-Bass_Made_Easy_(Pasquali%2C_Nicolo) Arnold's two volume set is available from Dover so not too expensive. Not all thorough bass manuals agree with each other. Likewise, much modern stuff (like secondary dominants AKA applied or attendent chords) were not ...


4

Yes You seem to already have the first part down: from your question I'm guess you know how to connect your keyboard and record MIDI data into your DAW. You are probably playing that MIDI data back through a virtual instrument instead of through your keyboard. In most DAWs, there are two different kinds of tracks that have MIDI. The first kind has MIDI and ...


4

Your question contains a crucial misunderstanding in the two words piano keyboard The defining feature of a piano keyboard is weighted keys, emulating the hammer mechanism of a real piano. Most teachers recommend learning with weighted keys, because otherwise kids get used to keys which take little-to-no force to press, and this makes it significantly ...


4

Lighed keys are unnecessary and counterproductive. For some serious piano learning an 88 key with hammer action is essential. Entry level digital pianos made by Yamaha, Kawai, Casio, Roland, Korg are available, but you have to double the budget. A Casio CDP-S100 is the cheapest option at the 360 Euro price and could run on alkaline batteries. Roland FP10, ...


4

I think the position of the fingering above and below the notes on the middle part is meant to indicate which hand plays the notes. The right hand G# F# 2 1 is fine (I don't know why another answer says it is "wrong!") if the following E F# E is the left hand 2 1 2 and then back to the right hand for the G# 2. However this logic about what the fingering ...


3

Harmony isn't a formulaic thing. When you harmonize a melody, you're first thinking about where it sounds like a chord change would work, and then you're considering ALL of the notes that will be played against that chord. They don't all have to be chord tones, but in general most of them will be. Look at the harmony for Happy Birthday: you have the C ...


3

It's unusual to use beaming for fingering groups rather than rhythmical groups, but by no means wrong. Once you've decided to use stem direction to express hand assignment, you're pretty much forced to write counter-rhythmical beams; the alternative would be to write half the notes with flags rather than beams, which looks even worse.


3

It's more unusual to use beams in this way in modern music, but it was very common in when Benda was writing. The rhythm itself is so simple it hardly needs any notation. You can't get much simpler than 16 equal length notes in a bar! So you might as well use the beams to show something else - and in the 18th century "something else" was either which hand ...


3

Knee room isn't a problem. Stability may be. But I've been gigging (literally) the same X-stands for about 40 years, and they haven't let me down yet! They're the type with a brace though. I don't trust the ones where ALL the strain is taken on the pivot point.


3

I found a different definition of intavolatura. Meaning scoring. In Elizabethan times, of the arrangement of madrigals for keyboard performance - the choral originals being in parts, not in score. Sort of related to partimenti? Can't find anything relating to 'involature'.


3

Why settle for Czerny pablum when there's so much good music to play? That's much more rewarding, and even simple good organ music gets you used to how, in pieces that you'd like to play for others or even just for yourself, the sound and touch and patterns differ from a piano. In particular, arpeggios and broken chords are common in piano from Bach's sons ...


2

As far as I know there isn't a standard notation for what you want. I'd probably use a half-pedal marking, but make the rise or dip in the pedal line wider - and be sure to include a performance instruction explaining the marking.


2

Because pictures of the hydraulis show only white keys, this question may be asking when black keys were first used. Well, then: The earliest organ keyboards... had seven notes for each octave... like the white keys of a piano. However new notes were added to this simple 'diatonic' scale. By 1300 the familiar scale of twelve semitones was already ...


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