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10

Apparently the AES wondered the same at some point and did this study: http://lsbaudio.com/publications/AES_Latency.pdf They had a sample comprising of different instrumentalists give a subjective grade to a monitoring system configured with a certain amount of latency, While the title says "in live sound monitoring" if you read it you'll see that the in-...


4

Consumer audio products like the "sound bars" you mentioned are made for applications where precise timing is less important. Whether there's a 2.5 ms or a 25 ms delay between the input and the output isn't really important for music playback or even TV. These products often combine analog and digital audio sources, and the easiest way to add e.g. ...


4

Eventually found the reason! It actually was Ableton fault. We spoke with an Ableton engineer who explain that there's some black magic happening in the Midi stack of Live. It will delay some midi to match the audio latency of the system. The 20ms added latency is tied to the audio buffer (and will increase if you increase the audio buffer) That makes ...


4

To answer the first part, no, Macs do not inherently present any latency. CoreAudio is a rock solid, extremely low overhead and one of the main reasons people go for Macs for audio. I get < 2ms latency in Ableton with my Apogee Duet. Your latency is most likely coming from the interface. There's probably some external editor with either a buffer size or ...


4

I would like to share my thoughts as they relate to your question about iOS touch to sound latency and "(virtual or MIDI) musical (instrument) practice or performance?" I must assume that your primary interest is - latency as it relates to iOS musical instruments and devices or other "virtual and digitally produced musical sounds (MIDI) during "practice or ...


3

Below is a shot of the latency numbers from Focusrite's page on the Clarett line specifically: This chart shows us a few interesting things. First, latency is also a function of sample rate, and more importantly for you, the host software and operating system both affect latency. So you could try a larger buffer setting with a higher sample rate to see if ...


3

Suppose that I play a note on the keyboard, what is the latency delay of the MIDI Note-On message before it reaches the VST-plugin? Clearly it depends on the hardware, but can it be an issue (i.e. introduce a latency > 10ms)? Yes Depending on the MIDI implementation, the drivers of the MIDI interface, and the bandwidth of USB or other interface bus, it is ...


3

Ways to reduce latency: Get a low-latency interface that operates on a low-latency bus (thunderbolt if possible, Firewire 800 or USB 3.0 if you have those busses available). Built-in audio inputs and outputs are unlikely to have low latency. Use or get as fast a processor as you can, OR use external processing for audio plug-ins, such as the UAD external ...


3

The effects of latency are a sliding scale ranging through: zero imperceivable perceivable as "feel" (like a drummer who's pulling slightly) perceivable as "something a bit wrong" perceivable as "something completely wrong"; making playing completely impossible The effect also depend on the kind of sound you're creating. If you're playing something with a ...


2

Short answer: no. Bluetooth was not designed for live sound. Bluetooth audio latency is in the region of 150 ms. If you happen to have an apt-X-enabled bluethooth device the latency is 30-40 ms, which from what I understand is as low as you can get. This might be acceptable for watching video, although just barely. For live sound (PA) use it is completely ...


2

An alternative, if you can't get it now enough, may be to record it with a less resource intensive vst, to get the midi notes into your daw etc with a low latency that won't distract your playing. Then, you could switch over to the vst you actually want, so that the finished track would have that. This works if it's not for a live playing application.


2

There are many variables that affect total latency because there are several sources of latency. Latency is introduced by the analog to digital conversion process, and then by several different buffers, such as the bus buffer (e.g., the USB buffer) and usually at least two software buffers (from the driver and the DAW). If any plug-ins are part of the signal ...


2

Apple USB MIDI (iOS/macOS) latency: approx 3.5ms Apple BLE MIDI macOS latency: approx 17 ms Apple BLE MIDI iOS latency: approx 22.5 ms These values were measured with MIDI latency tests designed for this purpose.


2

Do anything enough times, and it usually becomes a habit. It's a good thing - called practice which often leads to improvement, sometimes perfection... However, playing something in the way you describe, with latency or a delay, and that will become 'the norm'. Not a good thing when you play with others, as your timing will be slightly affected. You may be ...


2

Upon playback, then, I'll be off-beat and will have to nudge my vocal track slightly earlier, in order to have my downbeats line up with the computer's timeline (and any other tracks that are on-beat). (Please correct me if I'm wrong about this.) You’re wrong about that. The computer knows how much input latency there is and automatically records the new ...


1

Wouldn't you need an audio interface? I know when mine is plugged in and turned on all computer sound is routed through it, including any plugged in instruments. You could maybe add a headphone type Bluetooth adapter to one of the "outs". For example my focusrite scarlet has two headphone Jacks that I'm certain could do this with a simple Bluetooth adapter. ...


1

Yes, that is a standard way of working. Though, if you've got latency down as low as 10ms, maybe no need to bother. But don't play to a delayed metronome. Your DAW should have routing options for the metronome click. Make sure it's routed to the system beep, or even to a high note on the Roland piano. It won't get recorded.


1

In my experience the latency is more from a lower powered notebook so a different connection, even wireless IEMs might not fix it. If you have no noticeable latency with a wired connection then they do make cheaper RF headphone adapters that you plug into the headphone jack. (I sometimes use them when mixing from my iPad) The best way to be able to ...


1

Look at 'in ear monitors' designed for live use. Latency is typically 5ms on budget systems.


1

The pros (and many amateurs) us wireless in-ear monitoring systems. They are available in a range of prices from USD 200 or less up to thousands of dollars depending on features and sound quality. Some major manufacturers include Shure, Sennheiser, and Audio-Technica, all of which are equally respected for their microphones and headphones.


1

This is a YMMV question - as the latency is going to vary based on your configuration. For instance, the version of your Bluetooth, the signal strength and even where you are in proximity to the LE MIDI connection. These are all variables that make subtle or sometimes dramatic differences in the latency you experience. So you can check on the average ...


1

I have been looking into this problem and no one online came up with one extra solution which made a big difference for me: I had my USB midi keyboard plugged into the computer, and the USB audio interface (Tascam US2x2) sending sound out of the computer. The best latency I got that was stable enough was about 8ms while playing a virtual synth in Reaper, ...


1

When the (ISA)Turtle Beach Pinnacle was the king of PC soundcards, with 750 ms of audio latency, we somehow managed to make perfectly-synchronized multi-track recordings by arranging direct monitoring of the input, and pre-fetching the already ecorded tracks. But if you want to play a software sampler in real time from a MIDI keyboard, or to hear a ...


1

I've been using linux for real time music for many years, and have never had a case where end to end latency was more then a couple of milliseconds. Check out kxstudio. I can not speak to windows or mac as I haven't had experience with using those for music. I don't have the reps to comment, but of course be careful of taking a laptop on stage, especially ...


1

One example of when audio latency barely matters: You're recording clean vocals into your PC your audio interface, singing along with the tracks you've already laid down. There will be a latency effect both on the way in to the PC, and on the way out. However, the computer knows how big the audio buffer is on the way out, and plays 'early' to compensate; ...


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