12

A vamp is a repeating musical figure, like a guitar riff. In jazz, Latin jazz, and musical theater it’s often given for the accompaniment so that they can repeat as necessary during intros or solos, in which case it may be noted as “vamp until ready” or “vamp until cue.” Depending on the style and band, players may improvise on the vamp. The “open vamp” ...


10

you literally just point your bell into the stand, not directly touching it, but the sound should be muted by the stand


9

Yes, you're right that in many genres of music pianists and guitarists have to spontaneously come up with parts based only on chord symbols (and hopefully also listening to other members of the band). This is called comping. Bass players typically also have to do this too; even if the bassline is written out in that piece that isn't always the case (and if ...


8

Used like this "Latin" is a rather non-specific term. Markings denoting specific styles of Latin American Music, for instance Bossa-Nova, Samba, Mambo, Rumba, Salsa etc. would suggest particular associated rhythmic patterns, particularly for bass and drums. However, this generic use of the word "Latin" leaves a lot of room for interpretation by the performer;...


6

Pianists and guitarists in these styles are expected to be able to play from chord names and bass lines. If you cannot find an Fm6 in a heartbeat then this means more practice. As for the comping style, this varies between players and genres and is up to you. On the guitar it may be just four downstrokes per bar, a funky cross-rhythm in the style of Nile ...


5

It's not the chord so much as the rhythm that gets pushed. Nothing much to do with bossa, but it happens all the time in a lot of pieces, The emphasis is expected to come on the 1st beat of the next bar, but instead, comes a little earlier, usually on the & of 4 of the bar before (in 4/4). It effectively puts the emphasis where the next heavy beat ...


5

As a percussionist having played folkloric Afro-Cuban music, popular "Latin" music, jazz, Brazilian batucada & bossa nova, etc. for over 20 years now, I can say that Bob Broadley's answer is is really pretty clear and accurate. Calling something a "Latin" beat is really vague. Someone who actually performs any type of "Latin" music wouldn't even use the ...


4

The piano figure in salsa/latin jazz is called a 'montuno' and it does share some of the characteristics of the bass tumbao but it is rhythmically different. However, the piano montuno and bass tumbao work together with the clave and percussion to create the overall sound - to learn more about this I'd recommend the excellent Salsa Guidebook by Rebeca ...


4

A lot of salsa tunes use rumba clave instead of son and the bass tumbao is used the same in both. However, it doesn't match quite as well because the last beat on the three-side of the rumba clave occurs on the 'and' of 4, whereas the bass tumbao usually plays the anticipated note on the 4. Of course, the bass can emphasise the 4+ as well if desired. I ...


4

Lots of possibility, including: G blues scale Alternating GMaj D7 GMaj bebop scale (ionian with additional D# which must not fall on a beat) G lydian G harmonic major (ionian with b6) ... Check the Scale Syllabus for more ideas


4

I learned two interpretations of that chord. First, note that the same or similar progressions are very common, e.g. in the key of C: || Em7 Ebdim7 | Dm7 G7 | Cmaj7 || That part of Corcovado temporarily resolves to Fmaj7, so you have to transpose the above progression to F: || Am7 Abdim7 | Gm7 C7 | Fmaj7 || which is basically the same as the original ...


3

Note: It doesn't necessary have to be Latin. Good, because I can't speak to that at all :-) But there is something interesting about this rhythm that may be helpful. If I re-notate the rhythm and remove the rests, we're left with: and What's interesting is that these rhythms are actually symmetrical around their midpoints. In other words, they are ...


3

A vamp is a pattern, usually a simple pattern like one or two chords, that you keep repeating for the purpose of getting into a groove or letting one of the musicians take a solo.


3

A chord progression is a list of chords. A chord's voicing is the arrangement of notes within that chord. But you seem to be asking about something else, the rhythmic element of 'comping' in various styles. Yes, different comping styles for different musical styles. For a low-down blues you might simply play basic close-position chords 4-to-the-bar. In ...


3

Latin pop music is to some extent based on interlocking patterns in the rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, 47,275 drums). The piano part is (in some styles) called a montuno (so is the loud parts of some pieces too). The montuno is generally two measures (or 8 beats depending on how the composer chose the notation) based on another pattern called the clave....


3

I was wondering too, when I read this term in the other question about the Bossa Nova. Then I've found this link (s.below) that confirms what Tim explains. It says: Rhythm is also defined by chords and where they fall, a little earlier or later - I would say similar or the same as off-beat: I thought, the push chord must be what I know from the big band ...


3

There's actually some disagreement on that actually... People do it all the time... play clave in "afro-Cuban" or any & every "Latin" "style", usually if they're that vague about it... everything just starts sounding "Latinish". I used to play in Caribbean bands all the time and there's a big difference in how those drummers & percussionists ...


3

Here's what I was taught by my teacher with regards to solo piano when I was first starting off with him. It is a method to play solo piano with the chord spread out between both hands and the melody as the top note of the chord. It's definitely not the only approach to this, but it is a systematic approach that really helped me. Let's say you're playing ...


3

It depends. Chick Corea's rendition was a fusion between bebop harmonization and melodies, and Latin rhythms. If you listen to the track on Light As a Feather, you will see what I mean. Particularly, if you listen to his comping, you'll notice it's not a regular vamp, even though it all fits to that clave pattern. As far as harmony goes, whether the other ...


3

The bass line you describe is a typical son salsa bass line - the tumbao rhythm. To stay in the salsa idiom you should let the piano play salsa piano which I believe commonly anticipates the next chord just like the bass, yes. Actually I think it's not an anticipation but rather where the next chord or "bar" starts in salsa, but it would look like a mess ...


2

Shift the accents from the strong beats to the weaker beats in the measures marked Latin, as per syncopation. A Brazilian percussionist reminds me that in Samba, the joke is, "Where's the one?" Here's a youtube of Bill Evans... Might help? [Disclaimer: I am not a qualified Jazz bassist, nor Latin Bassist.]


2

I think the 'Stand' in the mind of the arranger is the dance band type, a substantial wooden structure used to front the band and bear a logo as well as merely support music. Pointing the instrument into this would have rather more effect than into the lightweight tripod stands we commonly use.


2

If your worried about catching your bell on the stand, try a bucket mute for a similar effect. It may be about keeping control of volume, or it could be a stylistic effect.


2

You've lots of low notes at your disposal! Just use them with l.h. and put the top parts of the chords in with r.h. Assuming you're accompanying a soloist of some sorts. If not, then you'll have to maybe arpeggiate 1,5 etc. with l.h. and some sparse chords along the melody with r.h.


2

Don't think it makes much difference. It's actually where I prefer the snare to be - leaving the spaces for three toms and a kick drum. But more often, the 'x' is used for cymbals and hi-hat, even though the more important part is the stem and any tails indicating quavers/semis, etc.


1

there are plenty of different note heads available in notation programs. Except of the drum-set and especially when all other percussion instruments have their own staff the selection and definition doesn’t matter and doesn’t mean anything. The different shapes of the note heads are only important for the composer and the conductor of the ensemble to ...


1

Jazz is one of the most sophisticated genres to improvise over and it can be seen as a style to add in the most theory as possible that not only sounds good, impressive or inspiring for other conscious musicians listening, but to also to sound nice to the average music listener who has no experience in music. The scales that you are already playing are nice....


1

I googled "mambo puertorriqueño" and found http://www.mamboenclave.com/en/articulos/?ide=8 which says ... el dos refleja el estilo puertorriqueño de tocar las acongas o tumbadoras, porque éste enfatiza el dos más que en, por ejemplo, el estilo cubano. Translating, ...the "on 2" reflects the Puerto Rican style of playing the conga drums, because this ...


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