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This is a good question but I think a hard one to pin down a short answer for. There reason is that there are several things going on in a musician's mind and body during the learning process and performance. First I would say that you want to use muscle memory. And, you do not want to be "thinking" about anything. When you get to that level performance ...


2

Yes, you become a better musician, if you are able to add the conceptual side of music into your thinking more closely. Having concepts and abstractions is essential for reasoning, and notation, notes and other theoretical tools can provide those. You need some kind of "objects" that have locations and names, for thinking about what things there are, where ...


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Everything sounds fine. I just finished recording a fairly complex guitar piece and realised I was thinking about all kinds of everyday stuff while I was doing. I try to bring my mind more or less back to the job at hand, but not in a " concentration with effort" way. Relaxed mindfulness is great but if the mind briefyly pops off here and there it's OK. Kind ...


2

The immediate job of playing THIS piece well ultimately comes down to muscle memory. But learning the piece is a lot quicker when you recognise patterns. Same difference whether they're heard or read. And that's all 'theory' is really - codifying patterns that work.


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