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For the how-do-you-know part -- I was never good at this stuff so I used the brute force method. Here's what you do. You look at the notes that are sounding on that beat and check if they are part of some triad. There might be two or three choices. At that point you can narrow things down by playing it and checking if one or the other sounds better in ...


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For starters, there's rarely one way in which to harmonise a melody. That's been proved thousands of times. Right now, I'm playing Summertime with four different bands, all with very different chords underneath ! Without getting into PACs etc., it makes sense that the chord tones and the melody lines match up. Obviously not totally, that would maybe mean a ...


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There's often no 'right answer to this sort of question'. V - I would be fine. There's nothing wrong with 'pre-empting the ending'. (Call it 'emphasizing the ending' if it makes you feel better!) V - VI would be another option - and I suspect that's the one your teacher is looking for. It would complete the exercise with one of each of the four main ...


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The "how would you know" part comes with more study and especially with practical experience. In this case, use V and VI — a deceptive cadence. You're correct to observe that the melody suggests a cadential quality and also that V - I undermines the actual ending. That is something of the "purpose" of a deceptive cadence — a "fake ...


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All other answers provide very good pointers how to tackle learning to (sight)read. However, this part of the question made me think there probably is a more fundamental issue: "I seem to spend all my time stopping on each beat to figure out the notes. It's painfully slow and I can spend hours doing this with a single piece, with little overall ...


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Since this question is in reference to beginning trumpet, here are some rules of thumb based on music written for a standard B♭ trumpet. Range of notes available The trumpet is designed to play the notes of the standard Western chromatic scale. A loose description of the notes available as one progresses: First notes learned: The very first lessons on ...


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Sight reading is a combination of a couple of skills. The first is having the technical facility to play what is in front of you. If you can't play a series of notes in front of you, you will stumble over the execution of them. The second is knowing music theory. Just as you can look at a sentence and just read the words without sounding them out, you ...


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There are two good fingerings for the high C: oxx xxo The intonation might not be quite perfect. half-holing just the LH 1st finger. Harder to play, but you can adjust the intonation as much as you want. These work on most whistles, not just the low D ones.


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The two pieces given as examples make significantly different demands on the reader. This post will be devoted to addressing those differences. For improving sight reading in the more broad sense, my own "philosophy" is outlined in Acquiring advanced level sight reading. Although the question may not seem directly relevant, my answer will also ...


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The only thing I can tell you with certainty is that you should indeed take lessons. Aside from your current problem (that you may well be able to solve by asking strangers on the internet given enough time and effort), playing the piano (or any other instrument) is a complex skill that involves, chiefly, hearing, motorics, something related to language ...


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I think you may find that investing in piano lessons would be the best way to relearn what you learnt as a child and to then go on to learn more complex skills. It is, however, entirely possible that you can learn by yourself, as with the internet and YouTube it is more accessible than ever to learn the piano. Despite this, having lessons would be beneficial ...


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You may be able to change the tuning of your kalimba. I had a commercially produced kalimba and the tangs were moveable by pushing/pulling them to become shorter/longer over the bridge which changes the tang's tuning. It's tricky to get the tuning right, but it's possible. About your actual question: dealing with chromatic pitches on a purely diatonic ...


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I think the key is in understanding what the composer did and why. To try to get into their shoes and follow their thinking path. Depending on the composition, instrumentation and specific things you'd like to learn it make take different forms. @ttw proposes copying scores, I'd suggest transcribing by ear and then comparing with a reference score. Yes, it ...


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Over the years, one of the exercises given to musicians was to just copy scores from famous composers. It's easier with computer notation programs. There are some free to expensive versions. One learns a lot from just transcribing a music score (pdf, book, sheet music) into a music entry program. The mechanics of entry allow one to see details that may be ...


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