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Been in similar position, I would recommend this Berklee Music Online MOOC https://www.coursera.org/learn/guitar I've taken it myself, lessons applied both to classic & electric guitars. The teacher is great, explains the whole process to follow along. Then you could also try there Fundamentals of Music Theory by University of Edinburgh. Good luck &...


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You get what you pay for. I see a lot of kudos for some online videos and the like, and I'm sure there are good teachers that try to do online stuff and put effort into making it good. But mastering the guitar is also about mastering your own body. I personally would not advise anyone to start or stay with online resources until they've had some training ...


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IMO both approaches have benefits. Sampling can more closely represent the instrument as it was recorded, at a specific point of time, a realistic snapshot as it were. Modelling can smore broadly represent the instrument as it is being played, (nuances, resonances etc), essentially more about the dynamic representations of the sound over time. ...


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Lighed keys are unnecessary and counterproductive. For some serious piano learning an 88 key with hammer action is essential. Entry level digital pianos made by Yamaha, Kawai, Casio, Roland, Korg are available, but you have to double the budget. A Casio CDP-S100 is the cheapest option at the 360 Euro price and could run on alkaline batteries. Roland FP10, ...


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In my opinion, you should not consider buying a keyboard with key lights. The lights do not help in any way to learn how to play keyboard. I would even say they distract from learning because your child will only watch the light patterns and try to "catch" the right keys in the right moment. It will not understand the connection between keys and ...


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Your question contains a crucial misunderstanding in the two words piano keyboard The defining feature of a piano keyboard is weighted keys, emulating the hammer mechanism of a real piano. Most teachers recommend learning with weighted keys, because otherwise kids get used to keys which take little-to-no force to press, and this makes it significantly ...


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Its only my opinion, but my observations in the music store are such that they lead me to think the lights on these keyboards serve one purpose, to sell keyboards. I've never known any teachers that use them to teach with, and I've never met anyone that actually learned to play music that way, so in my opinion the lights are a sales gimmick but an effective ...


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Don't bother with lights. The player will be forever chasing them. In fact, for a few weeks I recommend not trying to read dots either. Just get used to the instrument, what it can do, and have fun. I would hope that pound for pound, a keyboard without lights would have other, better features.Most will have speakers or a headphone port. Buying pre-loved ...


22

Without. Point blank. Lights look fun to start with, but a beginner will end up watching them rather than learning to read. Note, you can usually switch them off, so you don't have to choose a keyboard that doesn't have them. I have no recommendations on mobile teaching apps, I've never used them.


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To partly address your question, I would recommend going through the video series on How to Practise With a Metronome in a Relaxed, Enjoyable & Precise Way. It does not seem very popular but shows an excellent method to become comfortable playing with the metronome and develop the sense of time.


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I found this course to be very useful. (Haven't finished it yet though!) It's maybe a bit sparse on documentation and explanation, but whenever I encountered something I couldn't figure out, I just searched around the web until I found a more extensive explanation. Anyway, it's build up logically and will provide you with a clear road to understanding more ...


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My best advice is that you learn to read the sheet music by writing and notating the chords that you can play on the guitar: always in 4 symbolic representations: note names of the triads (just as letters) chord pattern on the guitar keyboard pattern (Tab and Bend picture picture in the notestaff (sheet music) if you want an example: Am: a c e what ...


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Since you play drums, it makes sense to look at the rhythm side of theory. There's enough meat there to last at least a month! At the same time, you will become accustomed to drum music, and what line/space each drum/cymbal lives on, and how the rhythms - some of which I'm sure you can play in your sleep - look like when written. That apart, reading ...


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if I need to learn something in particular, what it would be ? What basics I obligatory need ? There isn't really any area of theory that is obligatory. Different musical activities will benefit from different sets of knowledge. I really want to be able to read/write music on paper sheets In that case, perhaps you could start learning an instrument ...


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Augmented means one half step more than major or perfect, while diminished means one half step less than minor or perfect. So, a "tritone" such as C-F# is an augmented fourth, while the same thing written C-Gb is a diminished fifth. In practical terms, you'll see a diminished fifth in a dominant seventh chord, for example C-E-G-Bb has a diminished fifth ...


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