New answers tagged

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I presume you are looking for different ideas and perspectives about learning music and will state the old saying that "there is more than one way to skin a cat". You will have success at learning about music no matter which direction you approach it from, but you won't learn anything if you don't make the approach. Some folks learn from books, ...


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"I know I have to learn music to be able to improvise on blues and jazz tracks." This is simply not true. What you need to do is really like these musical forms, listen to a lot of "Blues" and "Jazz" and play what you like, just as you have been. If you want to know how scales, and modes, and "connected" to chords and ...


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There have been, and will be, many many great Blues players who haven't 'learned music' - whatever that is. It could mean learning to read music, in which case, it's true! It could mean understanding what music does and how it works, in which case it may very well not be true! Jazz can be a very different beast, with many more chords coming out to play, so ...


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I have thought that the reason to sing for ear training or with various drills is because it taps into a latent human ability to match pitch, to hear a pitch and then copy with your voice box. If a person isn't made to feel self conscious - like in an ear training test - or hasn't been defeated by a society that discourages singing for all, it isn't a big ...


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I fundamentally disagree with the answers that say, "First master your instrument." No-one with the possible exceptions of Liszt and Paganini ever completely mastered their instrument. There is no cut-off point where you or anyone else can say, "Now you are a master. It is time to start expressing yourself!". What a horrible thought! ...


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My own method of learning to express myself started when I learned to talk. I listened to how others around me talked. I heard them express happiness, sadness, joy, anger, disappointment, pride, etc. and I learned to mimic what I heard when I felt those different emotions. Years later I did the same process when I learned to express myself with music. First ...


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In my experience, it's not that ear training programs rely too heavily on singing, but that singing seems to be the best way to consolidate the information to your long term memory. I'd argue that most ear training programs do not require you to sing, but recommend you to do so through the exercises. The ones that require singing are generally tailored for ...


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You learn interval recognition by ear without singing the same way you learn interval recognition with singing, except this time you don't sing. Aaron's answer brings up playing an instrument as a substitute for singing. My piano teachers brought up interval songs as their primary way to teach me how to recognize intervals. With an interval song, I memorize ...


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I don't understand these answers saying there's no such thing as 'universal expression' ... because of different cultures? I think you'll find that 'expression' equals melody. "Is my approach to develop the ability of musical expression wrong? How did Blues musician develop their skill when they didn't have any formal training in a tough time like pre-...


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It's not really clear whether you're talking about expression in performance or expression in composition -- these are two different things to me. As a performer, expression comes from how and when you play each note. On guitar, you can play them very slightly early or late, dead-on the beat; plucked, strummed, hit, picked; sustained, staccato, muted, ...


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Short answer. Its tradition. Know the tradition of the music you want to express yourself in. This means constant listening, transcribing and youll dig deeper and deeper. Creativity is never invented it is passed on! Whenever we express something, we learned that expression from somebody else. Whether is expression in the realm of classical music, or in Jazz....


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Download the app "Perfect Ear" (I think there is a Perfect Ear 2 now) All notes are a frequency in the air. Wifh enough repitition we can learn the different between frequencies :) (1 dollar purchase to do other tests in the app, was worth it for me) Edit: Thank you for the responses, I would love to explain how the app works to help you with ...


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A valuable element of ear-training is establishing physical/felt associations with the adjustments needed to produce a certain interval. Traveling up a third or down a fifth requires a physical adjustment that can be internalized. Singing is an excellent way to internalize the feel of an interval, but it’s not the only way. Brass instruments: buzz intervals ...


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Master your instrument. Gain experience of all the styles it can play in. Gain experience of the repertoire. Steal ideas, then steal some more. When you feel impelled to play something 'sad' or something 'happy' you'll know some tricks. Your audience will marvel at your originality! You will realise how much it's a synthesis of how lots of previous ...


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To "express" yourself on a mechanical or electric device you need to have mastered the physics of creating sounds on that device to the point where you do not have to think about it. Musicians will be familiar with the phrase "stay out of the way", or something similar, told to them by a mentor or instructor. What this means is that you ...


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I define expression as any sort of communicational means for advancing one's intentions. Or something. A baby cries to express hunger and/or other needs. Then there's artistic expression, which is basically the same, but through artistic means. Whatever art is. Musical expression is the same, but through musical means. For a DJ, selecting a song is musical ...


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Dave's answer is a good one. Let me add something from the different point of view. First of all, I think you're counting on some "universal expression" that will work for everyone, but there is nothing like that, not even if you only take Western cultures. It seems that for many people there is a thin line between "awesome, powerful, ...


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Even people who have spent most of their lives talking find it hard to express themselves fully. So it's the same with a musical instrument. And often the music itself doesn't make it easy to inject much expression. So, complete mastery of the instrument is a good start point, along with complete mastery of the music in question. To put your own ...


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I have been playing the guitar for about 10 years, and in my experience, it's a mix of a lot of things. Keep in mind that I have had little formal training, so my learning experience has been basically along the lines of "Hey, this sounds cool, lemme see if I can do it". Learning it this way, I've noticed that there are some things that I just don'...


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You might be stepping too far back for this. The train thing was fundamental; the train beat is common to country as well, because it was a primary form of long-distance transformation. Chuck Berry mentioned the rhythm of the train in "Johnny B. Goode". That wasn't meant to communicate Ralph's character playing what he heard, but rather getting in ...


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Diana Deutsch has studied and published extensively on Absolute Pitch. The following excerpts are from "Absolute Pitch" on her website at the University of California, San Diego: https://deutsch.ucsd.edu/psychology/pages.php?i=215. One view, which has been championed for over a century, is that this ability is available only to rare people who ...


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Reflects the rest of life in some ways. If one either finds they're good at something, or particularly likes something, one will pursue that something more than other things. Learning the guitar from scratch, one learns certain common techniques, for want of a better word. One happens to like, or be good at, some more than others. So one continues with those ...


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There might be some statistical effects related to which guitarists you see the most. There's saying that it's better to know to do 1 thing best on the world than to know to do 100 things. Is it true? Hard to say. However if you look at famous artists, many of which started as amateurs without formal education, they often became famous for doing their "...


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I think you might be exaggerating a bit. For example, flat picking and finger picking I think are both learned by any competent player. I think a lot of guitar players at least try to develop familiarity with a lot of techniques and types of guitars. But I agree there is sure to be genre specialization. If you don't like metal, it's hard to imagine someone ...


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I would say a true professional will NOT specialize in a given technique. But your perception of technique might be a bit off. Classical guitar and electric guitar are completely different instruments. "Finger style" electric picking will not produce the same quality of tone as one a classical. You need to get used to the physics of the ...


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For a while I repaired amplifiers in a music store that provided rental instruments for students. These instruments were not top of the line instruments because there is no way of knowing how well these instruments would be cared for, but literally thousands of students learned how to play on these instruments. That shows that it's a valid approach when a ...


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No recommendations - not from this site! A cheap full-sized violin will do you for a year or so, by when you'll have either given up, or realised it's a cheap violin. Go for it. Cheap doesn't necessarily mean nasty. There are plenty of beginner instruments around these days. Might even pick up a pre-loved (my favourite). So, it would suffice for the time ...


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