New answers tagged

0

All answers you’ve got until now are great. In summary they are my learning concept even if they seem to be somehow contradictions. Analyzing leads to understanding, concentration leads to meditation, muscle memory helps you play in the flow and and 150% of knowledge and improvisation helps you to take up the thread when you’re dropped out. Learning ...


2

Yes, you become a better musician, if you are able to add the conceptual side of music into your thinking more closely. Having concepts and abstractions is essential for reasoning, and notation, notes and other theoretical tools can provide those. You need some kind of "objects" that have locations and names, for thinking about what things there are, where ...


2

This is a good question but I think a hard one to pin down a short answer for. There reason is that there are several things going on in a musician's mind and body during the learning process and performance. First I would say that you want to use muscle memory. And, you do not want to be "thinking" about anything. When you get to that level performance ...


2

Everything sounds fine. I just finished recording a fairly complex guitar piece and realised I was thinking about all kinds of everyday stuff while I was doing. I try to bring my mind more or less back to the job at hand, but not in a " concentration with effort" way. Relaxed mindfulness is great but if the mind briefyly pops off here and there it's OK. Kind ...


2

The immediate job of playing THIS piece well ultimately comes down to muscle memory. But learning the piece is a lot quicker when you recognise patterns. Same difference whether they're heard or read. And that's all 'theory' is really - codifying patterns that work.


0

The badest mistake that people make is that they try to transpose when they read/write different clefs! As you have learnt to read the Bass clef you should be able to make the transfer recognition that the ledger line between treble and bass clef id the line of c‘. And this ledger lines becomes now the C-line in the tenor and alto clef. If you have checked ...


1

There is no sure-fire way to tell and no substitute for experience listening. A general rule of thumb is how "breathy" the voice is. The breathier, the more likely to be a head voice. But you also have to take into account the individual singer and their range. Furthermore, there are singers who are so adept at making their head voice sound consistent with ...


1

Yes, they do have different effects. Often the difference is one of distance, or smoothness. A modulation from C to G will sound very smooth, because there's only one pitch that is different between C and G major. A modulation from C to F♯, though, will sound rather distant, because there's only one pitch in common between the two keys (there are sort ...


0

If you mean the rhythmic accompaniment of the right hand: On certain beats, instead of a full strum of the strings, we mute all the strings with our strumming hand, and simply run the pick across the dead strings, creating a "blip" kind of sound. This sound creates a very pleasing rhythmic contrast to the rest of the strums, which carry a full tone. The ...


3

Why am I finding Beethoven's sonata easier than Mozart's? Well, this isn't a very fair statement, given that you're actually referring to just the first movement of a sonata, and one which lays almost all the difficulty in the musical interpretation. If your question is about why it's easier to you from the technical point of view, I don't think you should ...


4

Why did you think the Mozart should be technically easier than the Beethoven? The Beethoven has simpler rhythm, slower tempo, and the left hand plays almost nothing. The Mozart is faster, the way the different rhythms in each hand interlock with each other is more complicated, and the right hand is using a very different finger technique than the simple ...


7

Definitely a trill. A forward slash would be much taller, narrower and more slanted. Certain fonts leave the tail and the cross off the 't' almost entirely, especially when italic and bold. Below is a comparison of '/r' and 'tr' in a more standard, modern font (on the left) and an older, less common font (on the right).


1

Even for a complete beginner, having the full 88 notes is desirable because it allows the player access to the whole soundscape of the piano. Sit a child down at a piano for the very first time, then ask them to imagine a storm; they will be drawn to the lower octaves for "crashes of thunder". Ask them to imagine a tiny bird, or an icy day, and they will ...


41

This is actually tr, the notation for "trill," an embellishment (or ornament) on a note where you rapidly alternate between the main pitch and an adjacent pitch. There are many different types of trills; the style of music (and perhaps editorial notes) will clarify exactly which type is intended. You can check out more in the Wikipedia article.


Top 50 recent answers are included