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16

This could be an instance of portato. Via wikipedia: Portato (Italian, past participle of portare, "to carry") in music denotes a smooth, pulsing articulation and is often notated by adding dots under slur markings. Portato, also known as articulated legato or slurred staccato or semi-staccato or mezzo-staccato, that means "moderately detached"....


12

Legato is a technique, whereas a slur is a marking. As for what a slur denotes, Wikipedia does a pretty good job of handling the distinction between that and legato (see Slur and Legato). The most relevant quote from the legato article: Legato technique is required for slurred performance, but unlike slurring (as that term is interpreted for some ...


9

Imagine a slur goes over a word. Here the word could have three syllables, or just one. In bar three, that word (whatever it is) would have all four notes sung . bar four, there's one word (of one syllable) on the D, and another - maybe three syllable word - sung to the other three dots. If you said the words, there would be a very slight gap between them, ...


8

The notation is quite clear. Bars 3 and 4 could have been notated the same way. They aren't. In bar 4, no slur into the D, no slur out of it. It's a 'stand-alone' note. Don't over-do it though, it's a subtle bit of phrasing. If this was a vocal piece, I'd interpret it as giving that note's word full length but meticulous diction


8

Legato is smooth transition from one note to another. Exactly that. One specific note to another specific note. Rather like how we string words together to speak sentences, or rather, phrases. If it's on, say, a trumpet, the notes will be played all in one breath, not separately tongued, usually. Portamento is similar, but will move from one note to the ...


7

For me it is always my left hand accidentally touching the E string (at the base of the first or second fingers where they join the palm), my bow drifting away from the bridge, my bow angle drifting so that it is no longer parallel to the bridge, or the angle of my bow to the string i.e. my bow is sitting too upright so that the bow hairs are not splayed ...


6

The top staves are "correct" for a slur, the bottom staves are correct for a phrasing slur. For music like violin music, this difference is more poignant than for piano since a slur has separate technical meaning as a bowing direction instruction (which implies legato but the legato can be dissolved with tenuto or staccato marks) while a phrasing slur is ...


5

why the first note on the bottom part has two legs? You're supposed to imagine that there are two parts in the left hand that happen to land on the same G on the first beat. If this piece was sung, for example, one voice might be singing G, Eb, Eb, and the other G, Bb, Bb. On the piano you'll probably end up playing it exactly as you would if that G didn'...


5

It's not particularly written well for piano (I guess that's the instrument you are trying to play it on), but look on the top line (all notes on treble clef) as the melody, with up stems, and part accompaniment, with down stems. This then puts the first chord as a 'backing', followed by the tune of another Eb, then F and G. The other notes under will make ...


5

As noted in the comments, all of this is because there are multiple voicings. Multiple stems mean that multiple voices play/sing those notes, which should address your first two questions. I believe that another voice would be doing the short E-F-G run while the other notes are tied. If you are trying to do this on a single instrument, you would re-...


5

The textbook Music Notation: A Manual of Modern Practice by Gardner Read answers your first question as follows: When slurs are placed over a passage that ends in a tied note, the slur sign should extend as far as the second note of the tie, rather than end of the first note. The principle involved should be obvious; the breath of the singer or wind ...


5

The hesitations (and the speed) are related to the "legato". It will take time and practice, but eventually you will need to make the left hand "flow" a lot more, there has to be a kind of constant ebb and flow feeling to the left hand. At the moment, each time you play a chord in the left hand, it sounds sort of isolated, like individual stabs coming one ...


4

It's likely part instrument, part string. The E string is not wound so it has less grip than the other strings anyway. This can be acerbated by the acoustics of the instrument: some instruments show this more than others. If the E string cuts into the bridge, this will generally also have this sort of effect. My violin maker fits a bit of drum skin (no ...


4

You should play this passage portato, as if each of the note were marked with a tenuto. I.e., you should detach each note, but play them to their full length.


4

I concur with @slim regarding this being a phrase marking, and not a slur or legato mark. I think the reason for it being there at all is to indicate that the two groups of three notes (F, A, D) are not to be phrased as such - rather, the semiquavers are to be phrased together in such a way as to stand apart from the D that follows. Without the phrase ...


3

Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


3

There isn't really much of a difference. When you shift slide on the guitar, you are trying to get the note as fast as you can while still making it noticeable that you shifted your hand by hitting the notes in between. Shift slides are generally rather fast while a glissando can be drawn out. Glissandos on guitar (and other instruments too such as piano ...


3

Legato means playing smoothly and in a flowing way. On guitar this it achieved in several ways'Hammering on, meaning playing a note then snapping another finger to a higher fret for the next note. Sort of opposite to this is pulling off, where you play a note, but have another finger on a lower fret as well. Then the first fretting finger slides a little ...


3

Neither hand "sounds" legato, because each melody note (R.H.) or chord (L.H.) fades away before the next one starts. Either play faster, or play on a piano that sustains notes longer. The L.H. accompaniment should be heard as a pulse on each low note, filled in by the next two chords. But the video has twelve pulses per bar. That's why it doesn't "sound" ...


3

The basic problem is dynamics. Everything is a uniform forte. The trick to making piano music sound legato is to match up the loudness at the end of each note, not at the start. The bass notes and chords die away much slower than the melody notes. Also, each chord contains several notes, compared with single notes in the right hand. Therefore the left hand ...


2

It seems to me that a pair of notes cannot be both legato and staccato at the same time. The only explanation that makes sense to me is that these are not slurs but phrase marks. Per Wikipedia: The slur is not to be confused with two other similar musical symbols. The tie is a curved line that links two notes of the same pitch to show that their ...


2

You've gotten some great answers about the specific piece of music - I'll answer the more general question. Legato literally means "bound together" - the sounds are connected. Staccato literally means "detached" - there's a space between the sounds. So you can't have a phrase that is both staccato and legato. But the symbol we use for legato, the curved ...


2

This is an articulation symbol called semi-staccato. It is meant to be performed exactly as its name implies; halfway between smoothly connected and detached, with only a slight disconnect between the notes. For any wind instrument, the semi-staccato notes in bars 2-3 would be performed with a very gentled tonguing on the notes indicated, such as using a "...


2

In this case I use downstrokes when moving up (towards the high E string), and upstrokes when moving down (towards the low E). This feels most natural to me. However, I'm convinced that there are (and shouldn't be) any rules as to what is right or wrong with such things. You should be open to try all possibilities to see what works best for you. It is true ...


2

Here are the main reasons why legato fingering is advised: There are many times when a note (or notes) is sustained through a pedal change. Sometimes this happens during a harmonic change in the underlying notes, while the melodic note must sustain through to the new harmony. The sustained note can be anywhere, but usually in the melodic and bass lines. ...


2

You probably don't mean "legato" as much as you mean "arco" (namely bowed as opposed to plucked). Yes, using pizzicato and arco next to each other is quite possible as violinists don't necessarily put aside the bow when doing pizzicato. Paganini even combines bowing with simultaneous left-hand pizzicato (of course, this needs careful consideration of ...


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