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61

I can answer this question from the kids point of view. When I was 6 I also started guitar lessons in a group of 3, just like your son. The first lesson I arrived with a 2/4 sized guitar and my teacher also recommended a full sized 4/4 guitar for me. My parents got one for me and I learned for about 5 years with it. At first we only played simple melodies ...


29

Interesting. Well, here you have a bit of a test between ego and technique, it seems. First and foremost should be correct technique. The teacher’s approach might work for some kids, but a good teacher modifies instruction for each student to get the desired result. Playing on an instrument that’s too large could result in your son learning odd techniques ...


20

Seems like the teacher has a good reputation. That doesn't come easily. The argument that son will have grown big enough after a while sounds like he could make slow progress, or be stuck on basic pieces for a long while. It also depends on how big your son is. 6yr olds come in many different shapes and sizes. Also E300 seems like a lot for a beginner guitar....


12

Could be almost anything. You were tired, hungry, distracted, etc. maybe your teacher was tired, hungry, or distracted. Maybe the weather had you in a funk. Maybe you were thinking about some other thing. These things happen. Sometimes you play great when you think your going to play horribly. Sometimes it's the other way around. It's just like almost ...


11

Some ideas which may help her play and practice: If she's not a larger than average ten-year-old, then I hope she has a smaller than normal guitar. If not, then a smaller size guitar may make it easier for her to learn and play. Electric guitars are usually strung with lighter strings and are easier to get started on, as long as she likes the sound. Let her ...


11

How much should lessons cost? The cost depends on the teacher (if they are famous / in high demand / highly educated) as well as where you live. Lessons in the city cost more. Lessons can range anywhere from $20-150/hr on average. Personally, I'd recommend you look in the $30-50/hr price point. Is it alright that I have zero musical knowledge, instrumental ...


11

Good question; it's important to know what skills are being emphasized with etudes like these. The first piece is a little un-melodic, but that's probably because this piece is designed to test right hand parallel thirds. In doing so, they wanted the notes themselves to be very easy, so they stuck with a clear five-finger setup. Notice how your right hand ...


10

I’m a player, not a teacher, but the topic of how to teach young children comes up fairly often on the discussion boards at www.violinist.com. I’d suggest searching for ‘Teaching young children’, and ‘5 year old’. Some of the high points that come up repeatedly: Don’t expect the child to concentrate for more than 5-15 minutes. Some kids will be on the low ...


8

Oddly enough, I actually ran into this very scenario yesterday as I was giving a guitar lesson. I initially had the student play the G in the way you describe, with pinkie on the high "e" (I always play this way as it is much easier for many other chord shapes). After seeing the student struggle quite a bit, we switched to the other fingering indicated in ...


8

All teachers bring something to the student that the student cannot get online: experienced observation and training catered to both the strengths and weaknesses particular to the student. Everyone is different. Everyone's bodies and brains work in subtly or seriously different ways. But drums (and guitars and math and Shakespeare) are all pretty much the ...


8

Weather and nutriture have been mentioned... A few points I‘d like to emphasize: Snow, water, sugar, preparation Let it flow, let it flow, let it flow! As a teacher I could always have been telling you when it will start snowing or when it was full moon. If you are dependent or influenced by such variables you can really find out by a log book. Also ...


7

Interaction with other musicians, whether as fellow-players in ensembles or as tutors. Constant goals - the concert is TOMORROW!, this exercise must be handed in NEXT WEEK! Competition - working with players better than you. And generally, getting a musical education instead of just learning to play the trumpet. Introduction to musical topics you would ...


7

I'm not aware that this is a common problem. As a young student, I always sounded best in my own practice room and much less well during lessons. I can think of two main reasons why it might be so in your case. You may trust your teacher and your natural musicality may induce you to imitate what you hear without knowing just what it is that you do. Possibly ...


6

The basics for playing the violin on average takes about 8 years. This would give you with a lot of practise and ensemble experience about the standard for a community orchestra which you could continue to play in with no lessons and just regular practise to maintain your standard. On the basis that you can learn an instrument as an adult with lessons once ...


6

One really good way to practice is to play only two or four bars at a time and master them in progression instead of stumbling through the whole song repeatedly. Even though it is much less interesting when practicing, this method gives you opportunity to learn what mistakes you are making and correct them before muscle memory takes place and becomes much ...


6

Chances are you took lessons on oboe and flute. Assuming you did, and the teachers were good, you would have appreciated their input. If not, you'll never know! Included in lots of the answers on this site is the phrase 'get yourself a teacher!'. And not always written by teachers!! Your worry about picking up bad habits will be allayed by having a teacher....


6

Why? Who can say. But it happens, to all of us. Your piano teacher didn't make a big deal of it, did he? Keep practicing. You'll be fine at the next lesson. Don't waste time over-thinking this. Use the time for practice. Or something eles that's fun!


5

Yes, you absolutely can. As with so many things, this is not a black-or-white thing. There's not some kind of gene that says you'll either be a master at playing the drums, or totally suck at it. Many things come into play here: The ability to concentrate. The ability to control your motions accurately. Eye-hand coordination. Stamina. Willpower. These are ...


5

In my experience a week of good practice that includes work on material covered in the lesson goes well with a once a week lesson. How long that lesson should be depends on a few things: How much time you put in to your practice. How much new stuff you can handle each week. (Do long lessons leave you feeling overwhelmed?, do short ones leave you feeling ...


5

You probably don't mean playing more efficiently or effectively. You mean practising more effectively. That has a more rigorous meaning: learning skills faster, without learning anti-skills (bad habits: "practice makes perfect" is not as true as "practice makes permanent"). The number of skills is enormous: steady tempo, accurate leaping to a note, ...


5

Your preeducation will mean that you can work with a teacher much more effectively since you'll be focusing mostly on piano playing mechanics rather than general music. After a few lessons, you might be able to cut down the frequency and still get frequent enough input to make a decisive difference. So in effect, you get quite better value out of a (good) ...


5

It appears as though you have stumbled into the fact that different teachers are appropriate for different levels of skill. Some teachers are fantastic for providing a strong foundation, but aren't able / interesting in wading into the loftier aspirations of their pursuit. Others are perfect for experimenting and for reaching far into the unknown, but are ...


5

As a guitar teacher, here is what I have always wanted students to be able to do in our first lesson: Tell me or at least know for themselves something about why they are learning guitar. The answer, "I'm not sure, I just like it" is actually one of the most promising answers, as opposed to "Well there's this girl, see?" which does not bode well, in my ...


5

The question should not be "is this teacher known?" The question should be "Is this teacher effective?" Plenty of "unknown" teachers are quite capable of helping you make faster progress than you could make on your own. Needless to say, you probably are better off learning on your own than learning from a bad teacher. Unfortunately there are a few of them ...


5

I believe that is a decision you will have to make yourself after taking everything into consideration. It is impossible for anyone on this site to really gain a complete understanding of the whole situation in its entirety given the limitations of the site. What I mean is there are so many factors to consider that it would be cumbersome for a site like ...


5

"The Wright Pianoforte Tutor" is a bit old-fashioned, but none the worse for that! I've seen it in many British piano stools. We still play melodies in 3rds and 'Alberti' patterns in the LH. (Not sure why @jjmusicnotes says it isn't Alberti?) If these are too hard for you, come back to them later.


5

You could go either way with size. For example you'd be unlikely to find a "Full size" contra-bass these days, but many still play them. Most pro bass players play 3/4 - 7/8 size basses. My point is that a smaller guitar is not necessarily bad. I might recommend it to an adult who is shorter than average. On the other hand, as some have said, kids (and ...


4

No, they are not always standarized. I live in Greece and we have a different system here. We have 3 or 4 grades (people usually skip the 1st grade, unless they are really young), and they are: Preliminary Starter Intermediate Advanced (These might not be 100% correct names, but this is how I translated them) I have met other people here in Greece who ...


4

Assuming that your teacher isn't terrible, she probably isn't giving you 'randoms' - she's probably trying to go through a progression of work that builds up your technique, and she's naturally reluctant for you to jump ahead and learn bad habits. Having said that, there's everything to gain in music by not having just one perspective, so if you are itching ...


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