11

Lilypond has several options to automatically display accidentals. I'm not sure which one suits you best, but perhaps one of these: teaching This rule is intended for students, and makes it easy to create scale sheets with automatically created cautionary accidentals. Accidentals are printed like with modern, but cautionary accidentals are added for all ...


9

Here I am overriding the barline stencil: fancyMarkup = \markup \with-dimensions #'(0 . 0) #'(0 . 0) { \raise #-2.5 \center-column { "D. S." "al" "Fin" } } \new StaffGroup << \new Staff { b1 b b b b \once \override Staff.BarLine.stencil = #(lambda (grob) (ly:stencil-...


8

You can define global defaults for grace notes with startGraceMusic and stopGraceMusic. The following code: startGraceMusic = { <>( \override NoteHead.font-size = #3 } stopGraceMusic = { \revert NoteHead.font-size <>) } \new Staff { \relative c'' { \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 ...


6

There's a NoteNames context which seems to do what you want. I haven't tested the solution below, but I'm glad you did and it worked for you: scale = \relative c' { c d e f g a b c } \new Staff { << \scale \context NoteNames { \set printOctaveNames = ##f \scale } >> }


6

It looks like that TuxGuitar fails to set the proper clef. Just find the music in the lilypond file and put \clef "G_8" in front of it. That will do the trick. Explanation: As Tom_C correctly points out, guitar is written in treble clef but one octave higher than it actually sounds. TuxGuitar apparently just sets a treble clef (or no clef at all, ...


5

While Glorfindel's answer is correct, it's a bit long-winded. Depending on your needs and the rest of the score, you can get the exact same results by simply inputting << { la4 la8 sib } \\ { fa4 fa } >> In other words, you can do this without all of the \new Voice = "this" and \voiceThat commands.


5

It looks like you could use some single staff polyphony. The following should work; it sets up two voices, one with stems up, the other with stems down, so they can play/sing different rhythms. \score { \new Staff << \key fa\major \clef bass \new Voice = "first" { \voiceOne la4 la8 sib } \new Voice = "second" { \...


4

Modifying @Richard's answer. Putting \relative do at the start of each voice keeps the voice in the same octave (in the second voice). Using q to repeat chords is very useful. << \relative do' { la4 la8 sib do4 do8 sib | } \\ \relative do { fa4 fa <fa la> q | } >>


4

Here's some solution, but less than ideal. I'd prefer to use unicode for the 1/2 symbol, but the time signature font didn't seem to support it. I think you want some basic time signature as I've put (5/8) and then change the text of that, positioning the 1 and 2 in the 1/2 and drawing the line inbetween. myTwoAndHalfTimeSig = { \override Staff....


3

Maybe something like this: \version "2.20.0" \header {tagline = ##f} \paper {page-count = 1 ragged-last-bottom = ##f} fourBarsThenBreak = { \repeat unfold 4 {s1^\markup { \fret-diagram #"d:0;6-1;5-1;4-1;3-1;2-1;1-1;" } }\break } global = { \key c \major \time 4/4 } ...


3

To be honest, I don't know an elegant way to do this and I would be very happy to see one. However, in the meantime, you can engrave it with use of a hack like this: lilybin. What I did there is essentially this: I attach a markup to the last note in the right hand like so: b-\tweak extra-offset #'(6 . 1.5) _\markup{\with-dimensions #'(0 . 0) #'(0 . 0) \...


2

This seems to work. Just don't put anything before \text. Modified \set Score.repeatCommands = #(list(list 'volta finVoltaTxt) 'end-repeat) to same form as \set Score.repeatCommands = #(list(list 'volta suiteVoltaTxt)) because the two variables suiteVoltaTxt and finVoltaTxt should really be together; not one done one way, the other done another way. ...


2

This trick puts your introduction inside of a score inside of a markup inside of the pianoStaff instrumentName. See the code here: lilypond code of answer in lilybin.com


2

This is probably linked to : why is guitar music written one octave higher? An easy fix would be to transpose everything 12 half tones higher but not sure if it easier in Tux or Lilypond...


1

Ad 1) Yes, it certainly is a very good practice. Larger scores would be a pain to manage without this. (It's also good for cases when you need a dynamic that does not attach to any particular notes in the music, e. g. you can write c1 in your music and s2\< s\> in your dynamics to make a crescendo-decrescendo pair on the single note.) Ad 2) You have ...


1

One solution would be to insert \once \override NoteColumn.force-hshift = -1.5 immediately before that first <c f>2: But as you see, this still comes out looking a bit strange; a sight reader may well get something wrong if they're suddenly confronted with this. You may thus want to tweak some other notes. Or, depending on the score, I may recommend ...


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