14

The notes in the upper staff are tuplets. As an aid towards your eventual goal, here is some sample code to create what you're looking for: \version "2.19.82" musicA = \relative c' { \key cis \minor \time 2/2 \omit TupletNumber \override TupletBracket.bracket-visibility = ##f \tuplet 3/2 4 { gis8_\markup { \italic { sempre \dynamic pp e senza ...


14

Invocation make will search the current directory for a file named Makefile or makefile, so it's often simplest to name it one of these two choices and then invoke with the simple command: $ make If you use the uppercase 'M' then the file will usually be listed at the top according to alphabetical or collation order. Rules make operates by using rules ...


11

Lilypond has several options to automatically display accidentals. I'm not sure which one suits you best, but perhaps one of these: teaching This rule is intended for students, and makes it easy to create scale sheets with automatically created cautionary accidentals. Accidentals are printed like with modern, but cautionary accidentals are added for all ...


10

This is the act of engraving different voices within a single system. In LilyPond, it is created with the << { *voice1goeshere*} >> \\ << { *voice2goeshere* } >> construction. Here is the relevant portion of the LilyPond manual. As a sample: \version "2.19.84" \score { \relative c' << { r4 <e g>4 q q | % ...


9

As noted in Rosie F's answer, the natural is not typically required here in modern notation. But if you wanted to get it in Lilypond, I don't think there's a default accidental setting that will display these in this circumstance. Instead, you probably will need to use the Accidental.restore-first property. Something like: b(-3 g) g g \tweak Accidental....


9

Just specify whether you want them up or down for each note, using ^ or _ instead of -. \version "2.19.83" \score { \new PianoStaff << \new Staff a'1-1 \new Staff \relative c, { \clef bass c4_5 \tuplet 3/2 { c8_5 f_2 g_1 } \tuplet 3/2 { a_2 g_1 f_2 } c4 } >> \layout { } }


9

Here I am overriding the barline stencil: fancyMarkup = \markup \with-dimensions #'(0 . 0) #'(0 . 0) { \raise #-2.5 \center-column { "D. S." "al" "Fin" } } \new StaffGroup << \new Staff { b1 b b b b \once \override Staff.BarLine.stencil = #(lambda (grob) (ly:stencil-...


8

The notes on the treble clef are triplets. That's all.


8

If all the stems point outward, it's easy, as you've noticed. If the note with a different duration is in the middle of the chord, you can write the noteheads slightly out of alignment so they only touch the stem that applies to them. For example, if you have, in the right hand of a piano score, a quarter note open fifth with a figure in sixteenth notes ...


8

A first approach would be to change the text of the tuplet number and append a small slur: bow-up = \markup { \with-dimensions #'(0 . 3) #'(0 . 0) \override #'(filled . #t) \path #.1 #'((moveto 0 0) (curveto 1 1.2 2 1.2 3 0) (curveto 2 0.9 1 0.9 0 0) (closepath)) } bow-down = \markup { \with-...


8

This can be achieved by using tags (see the documentation), for example as follows: \version "2.18.2" myMusic = { \relative c' { c4 d e f | \tag #'printonly { \override NoteHead.style = #'cross f4 f f f | \revert NoteHead.style } \tag #'midionly { r4 r r r | } g a b c | } } \score { \removeWithTag #'...


8

You can define global defaults for grace notes with startGraceMusic and stopGraceMusic. The following code: startGraceMusic = { <>( \override NoteHead.font-size = #3 } stopGraceMusic = { \revert NoteHead.font-size <>) } \new Staff { \relative c'' { \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 \grace { b16 } c4 ...


7

No, there is not. Lilypond is just like a programming language: it outputs exactly what you instruct it to. Adding slurs doesn't work for rests, and while they'd make real notes longer, they wouldn't output them as merged notes. Actually, the task you describe is just what I'd expect a program producing Lilypond files would do. It shouldn't be too hard to ...


7

The note with the two accidentals is an A#. The B has a natural, showing that the key sig has at least one flat. I guess it has at least 3 flats, so As are flat unless otherwise stated? There used to be a convention that if, say, the key sig makes As flat, and you want an A#, you put a natural and a sharp, as shown in your extract. (Modern practice is to ...


6

If you think your players will understand lesser-known Italian terms, use 'a piacere'. Or, if you want to control the performance to the extent of NOT wanting it 'straight', try 'expressivo, ped. ad lib.' (In the absence of instructions, pianists will 'pedal ad lib.' anyway.)


6

I don't fully understand what you're looking for in the bottom example. Feel free to clarify, or perhaps this answer will move you in the right direction. This solution specifies the number of staff lines while also specifying their positions. \version "2.18.2" \relative c' { \new DrumStaff << \drummode { \override Staff....


5

You need to restore the default stem direction with \revert Stem.direction because the notes are in a voice that has set the stem direction to DOWN. Use this: \version "2.19.83" \score { \new PianoStaff << \new Staff = "up" { << { \relative c' { \clef bass <g b d>2 <g b> } } \\ ...


5

Do you insist on using version 2.18? 2.19 can do it without trouble. You just have to stick the turning point just after the \autochange. So instead of \autochange { music }, you would use \autochange c { music }. This is what my Lilypond 2.19.62 does when I do that with your example (otherwise copied verbatim): \version "2.19.62" \language "german" \new ...


5

You can use a variation of this snippet and use a dynamics context to display the time signatures, like in the following example: \version "2.18.2" \score { << \new Dynamics { \time 2/4 s2 \time 3/4 s2. \time 4/4 s1 } \new Staff \relative c' { \key es \major \clef treble << { g'8[-3^\markup { \italic "sempre ...


5

It looks like you could use some single staff polyphony. The following should work; it sets up two voices, one with stems up, the other with stems down, so they can play/sing different rhythms. \score { \new Staff << \key fa\major \clef bass \new Voice = "first" { \voiceOne la4 la8 sib } \new Voice = "second" { \...


5

While Glorfindel's answer is correct, it's a bit long-winded. Depending on your needs and the rest of the score, you can get the exact same results by simply inputting << { la4 la8 sib } \\ { fa4 fa } >> In other words, you can do this without all of the \new Voice = "this" and \voiceThat commands.


5

There's a NoteNames context which seems to do what you want. I haven't tested the solution below, but I'm glad you did and it worked for you: scale = \relative c' { c d e f g a b c } \new Staff { << \scale \context NoteNames { \set printOctaveNames = ##f \scale } >> }


4

As for the bar numbers moved below the score, there are two approaches. The first would be to just use \override BarNumber.direction = #DOWN to shift the standard bar numbers down. The second approach adds a centred bar number for each bar below the score. This second approach is best described in this snippet. For the first approach, you can use the ...


4

This can be done with an Acciaccatura. How it is played depends on the time period it was written in, but is largely up to the interpretation of the performer. In classical music this is often played on the beat with the rest of the chord slightly delayed and played immediately after. Sometimes, especially if the Acciaccatura falls at the end of the ...


4

I would use the partcombine function together with the partcombineChords command this way: { \clef bass \partcombine { \partcombineChords g,4 } { <d c'>2 } \partcombine { \partcombineChords g,4 } { <f b!>2 } } Afterwards you shouldn't forget \partcombineAutomatic if necessary.


4

Your guess is correct about the meaning of the notation. Usually, for strings this implies that you play the lower note briefly at the beginning and then play the double-stop with the upper two notes and hold that for the rest of the duration. For Lilypond, I can immediately think of two common ways to do something like this. (1) The simplest is to tweak ...


4

luser droog’s answer gives a good overview of make itself. Here’s an example of how to apply that to a real-world Lilypond project with the following characteristics: Multiple parts: piano, bassoon, etc. Multiple movements. Multiple desired outputs: a single “master” (conductor) score, a master score for each movement, and a part score for each instrument. ...


4

This seems to be a problem with the way LilyPond handles the so-called grobs. The system bracket obviously has a height of zero, so that it does not affect the clipped area, but instead gets clipped itself. Anyways, as soon as you type notes into the lower staff that reach below the lowest staff line or if you append things below staff (such as dynamics or ...


4

You can add -dbackend null to your command, which will suppress the output of a printed score. Alternatively, you can use -dno-print-pages. A midi file will still be generated, as long as a \midi{} block is defined in your score. So, you command should look like this: lilypond -dbackend=null my_file.ly Or like this: lilypond -dno-print-pages my_file.ly


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