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37

In many live music contexts, musicians have the problem of hearing themselves clearly. Typically when playing loud, musicians are positioned behind the main speakers (heard by the audience) to avoid feedback, and for the safety of their own ears. In that basic scenario, musicians only hear: the quiet sound coming from their acoustic instruments or voices ...


30

So, I work in live production, specifically in audio. With very, very few exceptions the mics themselves and the mic cables have no immediate redundancy other than someone being ready to deal with a problem should one occur (though if a lead vocalist is using a wireless mic, there may be a wired mic tucked away someplace on stage the talent can get to ...


12

Playing in front of an audience is a skill in and of itself. Like any other skill it needs to be practiced. Pretending to be in front of an audience when practicing is one way to do it (though pretending only goes so far). Setting up your practice space to be more similar to a performance in any way will also help. If that means playing through speakers, ...


12

There are several youtube videos showing live setups for large bands, and you'll see that there is a LOT of redundancy in there. Thinking of Billy Joel's keyboard player David Rosenthal - he has two separate identical racks of equipment, set up so that pressing a single button can send the midi data to the B rack while the A rack is restarted, and he has a ...


11

The better bands I work with will have a list of all the songs - numbered. (That's one of the reasons they're called numbers !) The bandleader/ frontman will decide what gets played judging by the audience. If they are ready to dance, or just want to sit and chat, or even want to sit and listen. Numbers are often called out in twos or threes, so we know what'...


11

First, I mostly play folk, for very small groups. I’m sure a lot will change with your audience and style of music. The first thing to do is look at your audience. If I’m playing for an audience in a nursing home, I’ll choose more older and classic tunes than if I’m playing for a group of kids. If I’m playing background music, I’ll choose very different ...


9

As a sound technician for my church, one of the most important roles is making sure the musicians can hear themselves. This is done by controlling the levels in the monitors. Often, these sit on the stage and are called "Floor Monitors". These sit between the musicians and the crowed, and are pointed back at the performer.


8

The drummer usually has a click (and the track) in his (in-ear) monitor. The rest of the band can choose if they want the additional track in their monitors or not. As long as they can hear the drummer they'll be in sync with the track.


8

This is an interesting question. Before finishing the entire description I would have opted for your technique is not up to par and you are getting fatigued. However, you point out that this does not bother you at home and that it starts right away on stage (after the first pinch). If this is solely a performance anxiety issue it's probably psychological. ...


7

Keyboard player's stage presence is much like the drummer's situation. Better than that, keyboard player can be standing and vision of audience is not covered by metal sticks and discs spread all around, worse than that usually audience cannot see what or how a keyboard player plays the instrument. So body language should compensate for that. For better ...


7

Depends on the event. I'm in a Celtic folkadelic band so let's take for an example a bar gig on St. Patrick's Day. First tune is a modal tune that any of the musicians can drop in or drop out of with any settings that they choose. That's the soundcheck tune that we use to tweak the settings for the monitors that the sound engineer has set up for us and ...


7

What is the minimum setup to use VST on a live gig, hardware- and software-wise (please supply a complete list, including MIDI and audio stuff etc.)? Hardware: Any system capable of running a plug-in host (PC, laptop, tablet, mobile). Audio and MIDI interface that is compatible with that system. Software: A plug-in host (the program that will host the ...


6

Another term for monitoring is 'foldback', which sums it up quite nicely. The sound is re-routed via speakers- on stage or in ear,in order to be useful to each muso. Care needs to be taken that the mix given to each individual is not tainted by any other sound source.Drums and bass, for example, need to hear each other far more than , say keys, so the ...


6

Play in front of an audience. A lot. Start with the family pet and work up. Close your eyes, if you can do that without it affecting your playing. There's a reason why so many vocalists close their eyes when they step up to the mic. If you can't close your eyes, then pick a spot on the back wall just above your audience's head and look at that when you ...


6

I think you need to look at this historically. Back in the days when the only real mobile multi-track recording facility was owned by the Rolling Stones, then you would be lucky to even be recording to multi-track at all live, let alone have any redundancy in the system. The only 'redundancy' I can think of was that they had to run 2 totally separate sound ...


6

Nevermind guys, I figured it out. So basically Ableton has a feature where you can map tasks like arming or disarming a track onto a MIDI event (CTRL+M). But it needs to receive that event from an external source. So I set up a dummy track containing the MIDI events that would trigger the required action at the right time. Now all I had to do was figure ...


5

When and why are in-ear monitors (IEMs) used together with monitor speakers? That hybrid monitoring configuration is becoming very common. The main why and when, according to Mix Magazine, is the preferences of the band members. One member can ask for in-ears, while another can ask for speakers. In-ear monitors are not for everyone. Drummers and ...


4

I would start with lively and bright tempo songs then introduce a slower tune. Usually a cover band will play three sets with twelve songs each in my experience. We put in one or two slower songs in each set. People want energy and dance in a top 40 cover band so I would play songs that are popular and energetic. In the middle of the perfomance is where the ...


4

I don't have much experience in this area, but I can recommend Apple Mainstage, a $30 app for Macs that works with any number of MIDI controllers attached to a single Mac computer. Mainstage does everything you ask for in your answer except work with VSTs. If that's a dealbreaker for you, you will need to look for different software, unfortunately. Instead ...


4

Building a PA with mystery speakers is fraught with peril. The biggest question that faces you is: If you blow one or more of those speakers, who will care and how much will they care? Speakers that are not well marked are usually the cheapest kind. So you're probably not risking a lot of value, unless there's some kind of sentimental value or just ...


4

Regarding destroying the amplifier, this is not going to be a problem with the Looper. It is designed to be in line with a guitar or a keyboard, and you can set the volume levels of your loops. You shouldn't worry about or output impedance either. Input is 1MOhm, and output is 100Ohm - which are fine for this usage. You may not need the mixer - the looper ...


4

Yes, as Matt L. said - it's a "click track" sent to the drummer's headphones; the rest of the band simply hears the drums in most cases and follows that. If you need to do this, a solution I came up with that worked great for us was this (keep in mind, this will only send a MONO signal to the PA system / Front-of-House mixer but that's normally OK since you ...


4

It's not weird, and it's not uncommon. But, as a performer, you have to deal with it, and learn to accept applause graciously when it's offered.


3

With an analogue mixer and a 2 input computer audio interface there's no way of processing each of the independent mixer's channels in the DAW. The issue is not that the mixer is analogue (most of the entry level mixers with embedded audio interface are analogues mixers), but that you don't have any way of feeding each of the 10 channels independently to ...


3

The answer to most of this is relax, keep your throat muscles loose (yawning actually helps with this). An audience wants you to be good, so they're typically behind you, but if you act nervous, that'll come across in the 'feel' of the gig more than anything. There's various techniques, keep moving your feet beforehand, to keep blood flowing. Breathe ...


3

There is no solution that does audio and video and light. It's very, very expensive and time-consuming to pre-produce an entire show. Aside from preparation cost, you also have to factor in that all the needed equipment should be brought on tour as well. Most touring DJs cannot afford this and also cannot permit to lock down their playlist. There are a few ...


3

As we use a prerecorded drum track in Cubase for each track, we plan each gig well in advance, knowing exactly what will happen to the microsecond - this has some upsides, in that we can work specific tunes in to fit any set length etc., but means we don't have so much flexibility on the day (we can reorder them on the fly, but it's a bit of extra messing ...


3

You can run the output of any mixer into a channel (or bus) of another. What you CAN'T do, unless the mixers are specifically designed to be linked, is share the same effects sends, monitor sends etc. So think of it as feeding in a submix, not so much as extending the desk.


3

Not a product recommendation, but there is gear like this: https://www.scan.co.uk/products/tascam-da-6400dp-compact-64-channel-digital-multitrack-recorder Feature headlines include: The DA-6400dp includes a redundant power supply In addition to the DA-6400 standard model, the DA-6400dp is available with two power supply circuits to allow redundant power ...


2

In my limited experience with my jazz band, I open and close with our best tunes, and then alternate styles (swing/Latin/rock, fast/slow, different soloists etc.) for the rest of them. In another band, I've noticed that the band leader usually properly introduces us after the first song (or two if the first is a soundcheck). As well as the set list, we also ...


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