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25

Availability. Guitars are far more available than lutes. You can go down to any music store and buy a guitar for a very reasonable price. Even non-musicians will sometimes keep a guitar on hand. Just from personal experience, but I know someone who only occasionally plays the guitar, but he has 3 on hand. Why? He found them for a couple hundred dollars. ...


11

Check out this picture: Notice two things: Lots of strings Tuning pegs instead of tuning machines If you've ever tuned with pegs, you know that tuning pegs can be very tedious to tune with. A violin, viola, or cello often has pegs, but they have only four strings and most players will put fine tuners at the tailpiece end, which makes it much easier. Just ...


7

The lute has a very pleasant part of the audio spectrum in the classical repertoire. It is much easier to get a lute working with a string ensemble than it is a guitar. It just seems to fit the spectrum better. Unfortunately, that is often overshadowed by the sheer impractical nature of the lute. It has a number of strings more than a guitar. You have ...


7

The lute is a very difficult instrument to maintain. Has lots of issues with stability in various temperatures and humidities. And the sharp angle in the neck makes it easy to mistreat physically. Also, it's difficult to build, and a lot of people who used to make them have switched to violin-family, only partly because there's more demand for those. So, ...


6

The history of harmony is related to the history of polyphony. The lyra of the Greek had different strings according to different modes but their music was monophone (only melodic). The polyphony has been developed by the monks (organii, bourdon, fauxbourdon). Mind that the church organ has been introduced before the harpsichord and the oud. Melody and ...


4

Western music has never been "harmonically driven". To get the misinformation about the lute out of the way first: lutes never had frets to impose "precise tuning". The frets were simply loops of gut tied around the neck of the instrument and were intended to be moveable at will by the performer They were simply playing aids, when the number of strings ...


4

I had a similar problem. with a renaissance lute, and fixed the problem with some stuff called "peg dope". This should be obtainable from a shop which sells violins, as they can exhibit the same problem. If that doesn't solve the problem, then I suspect that you will need to visit a luthier to get the pegs fitted better into the holes in the peg-box. ...


4

Looks like a Swedish Lute to me.


3

Well, in many cases "arranging" for the guitar involves looking at the notes on the G string (third highest) and see whether they could still be fingered when the lute "G sharp" string (actually D sharp) was tuned one half note down to its nominal guitar G. Of course, apart from this one-string change, a common lute is tuned a whole fourth higher on the ...


2

Guitar abhors a key with flats. g minor is the relative key with a Bb and Eb in its key signature. You have an open B string and open E string, not Bb and Eb. a minor on the other hands has no flats and just a G#, you also have an open A string, this key is a much more guitaristic key. As a general rule of thumb, you want your keys to be either E, A or D ...


1

Usually the motivation for transcribing is either because the instrument can't do the entire range of the piece without transcribing, or the singer can't do the entire range (if it's a song). Sometimes, for certain instruments, a transcribed version may be easier to play as well. Trying to do the fingering in the original key may be horrid.


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