18

The wood type in any stringed instrument matters a great deal, especially on acoustic instruments. Some parts of the violin contribute more to the overall tone quality than others, but all the parts make a difference. A stringed instrument is a case study in engineering trade-offs. After all, how does a violin produce its sound? To begin with, note that ...


12

Producing a sharp angle for the string over the fretwire makes for a clear, clean sound. So just behind the fretwire will be a good place. It also means not having to press down on the fingerboard so hard - keep the same pressure on and move a finger around on a fret - lower, wider frets will show better, and you'll find more pressure is needed for a clear ...


11

To make it safe against buzz, the string has to run across the zero fret with a bit of pressure. This makes the strings move across the fret with some stickiness so they follow the tuning machine more hesitatingly. In effect, you get some of the downsides from most tremolo bars with regard to tuning stability. In addition, frets get indentations from ...


10

Check the neck for bowing, twisting, and any other defect. Also check the action on the neck. Check play every fret on each string and be sure that they all ring purely and that they don't squeak out. Check if the frets are worn down, which could cause squeaking. Check the intonation (play a harmonic on the 12th fret, then play the same string with the ...


9

There is no specific combination of wood types that make a guitar more or less appropriate for rock/metal music. Essentially all combinations can and have been used to good effect by various artists in these genres. Other features besides the type wood are likely to have a more significant effect on the the behaviour of the guitar; at most you could ...


9

The lines illustrate the bracing... Special made wooden braces glued on the top and bottom of the guitar, inside the body of the guitar. Without bracing, the construction would not be strong enough for the tension of the strings and various forces/impacts from everyday useage. The bracing has an effect on how the top and bottom of the guitar vibrate in ...


9

The majority of sound from an acoustic guitar is produced by the sound board (or 'top'). The soundhole allows the sound waves generated at the inside face of the soundboard to escape the body. With all else being equal, a guitar with only a sound hole in the side will be quieter from the front but probably louder to the player. Any difference in tone ...


8

The proper place to fret a string is close to the fret wire. Your finger should be right behind the fret. You should not have to apply a lot of force to depress the string. A lot of beginners make the mistake of thinking that you can place the finger anywhere between the frets with the same result since the fret defines where the string stops but this is ...


7

If we separate out the effects you could see, The body/neck wood could absorb energy from the strings, causing the sound to decay faster (and with preference for certain frequencies) The body/neck wood could then retransmit energy back into the strings, again possibly with preference for certain frequencies due to resonances in the wood The body/neck could ...


6

This answer is specifically about acoustic guitar sound board grading as as that's what your question refers to, there are other grading systems for other instrument building woods. Different wood grades do not affect the tone. Soundboards are graded on aesthetic properties: straightness of grain, grain spacing, angle of quartering, degree of figuring, ...


6

You seem to have done a little research on what the particular model Fender Guitar in question should sell for. And from your question, it appears that you have some concerns about why this one seems to have been on the market for some time. While the other answers offer good general advice about assessing the condition of a particular guitar, my answer ...


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


6

In Europe, stringed instruments (harps, guitars, violins) have used strings made from animal gut for millenia. The lower strings of a guitar were sometimes made with gut wrapped around a silk core. Here are the icky details.


5

There are a few things you might not be able to check easily when you go to see it: Whether the truss rod works. Even if the action and setup seem perfect, do you know that the neck's truss rod will respond properly when you change to heavier strings, or decide that you want to play with a higher or lower action? Whether the guitar picks up electrical hum....


5

The optimal string height for a mountain dulcimer won't be radically different than for any other fretted instrument. It is at least partly a matter of personal preference. In general: The string height will need to be high enough that you can play a note on any fret without buzz If you tend to play hard, you will need to increase the string height. If you ...


5

Schemtics are tricky, there's 3 things you can do: This link contains many blue prints of a Gibson Les Paul. There are no measurements on each axis. However, on each PDF there is a scale. Use the scale as a reference point, print out the diagrams and use a ruler to get exact sizing. Easy! This photo contains scaling for the cavity and POT's however the ...


5

Take it in and let a pro do it. How did this happen? Was it a surprise when you found it or did you knock it over and cause the split? I have a home made Les Paul (I made it) that I knocked over twice. The first time the head stock split but did not open, as a result the wood grain fit perfectly together like a jigsaw puzzle. My dad (a Luthier) and I ...


4

It makes no difference to the sound or playability of an electric guitar whether you have rosewood or maple for the fingerboard. Did you know that the human eye has a blind spot that your brain fills in for you? Your hearing can be influenced by a number of factors. People lose high frequencies as they age. Volume changes what we hear and fatigue can set ...


4

My name is Bruce Rubin of Rubinsguitars.com The soundboard grading system is based on cosmetic appearance and closeness of the grain. When a well-crafted soundboard is produced by a skilled maker, He will balance that specific top to resonate based on the characteristics of that specific piece of wood. My experience has shown me cosmetic appearance has ...


4

Electric guitar sound is affected, among other things, by the way the wood absorbs the vibrations of the strings. The sustain and the brightness of the sound comes, in part, from the wood used. Availability, workability and visual properties are also important. The most popular rock guitars are Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul. Strat bodies are ...


4

All the notes would play flat (lower in pitch). The 12th fret (for example) should normally be halfway along the string, so that it sounds an octave higher than the open string. If the bridge saddle is further from the 12th fret than the nut is, the 12th fret would play a pitch lower than the octave above the open string.


4

It looks like it's being held together by the tension of the strings, which isn't too bad a scenario. It could stay like that for years! However, if you need it fixing, an obvious is take it to a luthier. I've repaired several breaks like this, and yes, the split needs to be opened up to get the adhesive (generally epoxy resin two pack) into the gap, to ...


4

A damp (not wet) rag should not cause any issues with most guitars - but, it's not going to do too much, in my opinion. Most of the dirt on a fingerboard is from oil off the users fingers, so you need a (gentle) solvent to clean that off. Personally, I use Lemon Oil for that (or, in a pinch, Olive Oil)


3

The situation is similar to a speaker cabinet with a separate hole in the baffle. Speakers move air by moving backwards and forwards. There is a 'push' of air as the cone moves forwards, and also a 'push backwards' as it moves back. The air in a normal enclosed cab goes nowhere, but in a ported cab has a chance to 'push' through the port (separate hole). ...


3

The wood used in a electric guitar will add body to the pure vibrating string sound. My luthier once told me that the wood you use is like a landscape and the pickups are like windows through which you observe it. If the landscape has some beautiful sections, but your window can only let you see the ugly portions of it, you have a problem. The strings are ...


3

I de-fretted my jazz bass fingerboard using a soldering iron to heat the frets, helping the wood to release them. I'd tape on either side of the fret to protect the fingerboard itself, and then gently rock the fret back and forth until it freed from the rosewood and pulled out. The operation was very successful and my fingerboard is not damaged in any way. ...


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