42

STOP PLAYING You should not feel any electricity when playing guitar. There could be many reasons, including electrical equipment malfunction or incorrect electric installation in your room. There were accidents of electric shock from music equipment, including fatal ones. Frequent causes are malfunction of the amplifier or ground mismatch between two ...


31

It might extend string life, and it might make the piano sound rather dull since the strings may be designed for the tension at which A is 440 Hz or even higher. Whether it's better is a matter of opinion. The fact that Verdi used 432 Hz (if that is in fact true; this is the first I've heard of it) has very little bearing on the tuning of a piano unless it ...


28

As a bowmaker, I would like to temper these answers a bit. Yes, if you leave a bow under tension too long, it will lose its camber (bend) faster. So that's true: one should get in the habit of loosening the bow. But- one, all bows lose camber eventually, even if they are loosened religiously, unless they meet some other untimely end beforehand, because ...


25

I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to de-...


21

Why do guitarists re-fret their guitars? We re-fret guitars because you can get fret wear from playing. The most common type is when the upper frets of the guitar, usually around 17-20, will wear down because of playing and once the frets are worn down then the strings will begin to rattle more and the guitar will sound less clear. There are materials that ...


21

I'd add to Dr. Mayhem's list: You never know when something will interrupt your plans. You might be 20 mins into a planned 1-hour break, and then the doorbell rings, you welcome a friend, ... next thing you know you're going out for lunch and completely forgetting the tensioned bow. By making a habit of loosening the bow every time you get up, you'll ...


19

While I've read several different sources recommending not removing all the strings at once, I've never read a good reason why not, and I've always restrung by removing all the strings first. The main reason is exactly as you say: to be able to clean and condition everything under the strings. I clean the fretboard and body area, oil the fretboard, and even ...


18

The reason people in tutorials often cut the guitar strings is because they are often professionals whose goal is to change a set of strings as fast as possible. They aren't concerned with re-using the strings. But in your case, yes, you can definitely re-use the strings. Just unwind them completely instead of cutting them.


17

Buying a used piano can be daunting task and large investment. You should make sure you know what you are buying before you buy it. I think that you are taking a very smart approach by inspecting it yourself and then having a professional look at it. When inspecting a piano I would search for the following things. On first glance I would inspect the ...


17

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


17

There is no protection on earth that will protect 100% against a baggage handler having a bad day :) Some things to look at; Buy the guitar a seat. If my guitar was incredibly valuable, this would be the cheapest solution versus purchasing insurance on it, and it would never be out of sight. You'll get two inflight meals, as well... :p Insurance. Make sure ...


17

This could be a lethal problem. It's just not safe to continue. Firstly, check the socket you usually use. Socket testers are very cheap, and worth having. When I was gigging several times a week, the first thing I would do is check the stage electrics. Several times, we had to use sockets which were not the convenient ones on stage - they were faulty - ...


16

I think the main reason why people dissuade from taking off all strings is historical: on violin-family instruments as well as many archtop guitars, the bridge is not fixed on the instrument at all. It just stands freely on the top surface – normally held in place by the strings. But if you take the strings off, the bridge will fall, and you need to be ...


16

When playing period music, on period instruments, they are tuned to the standard of that time, if at all possible. Partly to be authentic, mostly to be kind to the instruments. Understandably. Given that your piano is old, thus the strings probably are too, any Hz lower than 440 will be kinder. There's no good reason to use 432Hz, though. If it was mine, I'...


15

I am a Registered Piano Technician with the Piano Technicians Guild. Pianos go out of tune during a move due to humidity differences and/or the different shape of the floor. The floor can slightly twist the piano which knocks it out. Now, let's be reasonable here. Was this piano tuned every four months? Are you going to keep tuning it every four months? ...


15

If the piano's passed an inspection that meticulous, then it doesn't need a tuning. "Once a year" is general advice to correct for seasonal variations of humidity. In climates with a significant winter and summer, other advice is to tune a few weeks after you've started to run the furnace, and then again after you've started to run the air conditioner. ...


14

The sustain (damper) pedal on a studio piano pushes a rod which connects to the lever which connects to the dampers. This is adjustable with a screw, to allow the dampers to rest on the strings (apart from the top octave or so) with the correct pressure, when the pedal is at rest. It sounds like the dampers are not pressing enough. It won't be a feature, and ...


14

I would always loosen it off for that one hour break, for two reasons: Over time, tension will eventually damage the bow. Keeping tension on when you don't need to will just shorten the lifespan of the bow. Maybe not by much, but: It is so easy to slacken and then re-tension the bow, that you might as well just get used to doing it.


13

If you play a steel string guitar enough, the steel strings eventually wear down the frets to a point where the intonation is out of balance because the frets lose their crown (which provides a precise point of contact for the string when fretting). And certain frets will wear more than others which makes it impossible to maintain a low action across all ...


13

Short answer: no. As a non-drying vegetable oil, it will eventually become rancid and not be fun. Same as safflower, peanut, sunflower, coconut, palm, etc. A better choice is a "drying oil" such as linseed oil, walnut oil, or a non-organic mineral oil or tung oil. Some folks have had good results using a citrus oil (orange, lemon) to clean, and then an ...


13

Yes, holes need to be added for the strings. Pegs for violin family instruments are usually sold as "blanks" that are ready for shaping and setting. Because of the wear and use of the pegs, the peg hole sizes in the peg box will vary, requiring each peg to be individually shaped to correctly fit the hole. This is usually done by a trained professional using ...


12

Twelve string guitars have basic tuning the same as a 6 string (EADGBE) but the pairs are arranged a little differently: For the thickest 4 pairs (EADG) the thinner string of each pair should be an octave higher than the thicker string For the thinnest two pairs (BE) each string of the pair should be tuned in unison. There is a handy tuner online at get-...


11

There's tuning, and then there's intonation. The frets of a guitar are laid on the fretboard according to a very precise mathematical calculation, based on the full length of the string from nut to saddle. On an electric, the curve of the neck, the height of each string (or all strings), and the distance from each bridge saddle to the nut can be precisely ...


11

No, there is absolutely no risk. You may have seen such amplifiers being stacked on stage during festivals/concerts, and those burdens can get heavier than what you weigh. Just make sure you're not hurting your ears by being too close to your amp when it's turned up to eleven.


11

Basic troubleshooting demands isolation and substitution. You need to do some homework before anyone can render a meaningful answer. Here is your assignment: 1) substitute the guitar with another electric, do you get the same result? 2) if not, substitute the guitar cable, do you get the same result? Now if you don't get the same result in the first test, ...


11

Dirt, oil, and moisture accelerate the wear on your instrument’s strings and finish. Wet hands will make your strings wear out faster and may damage the finish of your neck. Moisture will also soften your calluses and skin, so you may end up with the same kinds of soreness and skin damage that beginners get. It’s a good idea to play only with clean, dry ...


11

I'm assuming you mean the individual pole pieces have rust on the top of them, as Stratocasters don't tend to have pickup covers (which can be easier to clean and polish) First off, remember that removing rust isn't necessary to having the guitar sound good, and in fact that vintage aged look can be very desirable. Second, most ways to clean them result in ...


11

Do not try to force the peg out using the string, the ball presses against the peg to lock it in place and you can damage your peg slot by forcing it. Here's how we do it at the shop: Loosen all the strings, enough to get your hand in the sound hole. If your hand is small enough, reach in the sound hole and locate the end of the pin that is broken. Grab it ...


11

It's hard to tell from the photographs* whether the entire neck has 'simply' sheared off, or whether there's some body collapse to go with it. Either way, it needs a professional. Price up the cost of a repair against cost of a new instrument. If this is the same damage as was already repaired, I'd have a serious word with whoever repaired it. Choice of; do ...


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