New answers tagged

1

If the action isn't so high that the string is being stretched to too sharp, it's most likely the bridge or its saddles are too close to the nut. It may not be an adjustable bridge, in which case there's little you can do. Sounds like it needs moving 2 or 3 mm back, which may well be impossible.


1

Most of the fabric used for cases (that I see in the US) is Nylon or Nylon based fabric. For a slip cover that goes over a hard case such as you find on Flute and sometimes Clarinet cases, you should be able to hand wash the slip cover with washing soap. For soft covered hard cases, such as covered plywood or covered Styrofoam, you can't really wash them ...


2

For regular cleaning I would just use mild soap and water. Anything more powerful could damage metall or pads of the instrument. Since mould actually cries for something else, e.g. vinegar, I would dispose that soft case.


0

It appears you've lost the nut on your output jack, so you'll need to find a replacement nut. Talk to the repair tech at your music shop, he has probably got a few extras. You might ask for a matching lock washer and flat washer to go with the nut. Once that has been accomplished you may reassemble by following these steps. First put the lock washer on the ...


2

Really hard to tell from those photos, but is this bit threaded? If so, you've lost the nut that goes on the outside. Any guitar shop should be able to find you one. After comments: I've never had a socket come loose twice. Tighten it properly, it'll never happen again. Bit of superglue on the thread might help too, if you struggle to reach in properly - ...


0

I agree The 12 string Must be tuned 2 notes lower, i have proved the strain on my 12 strings when toned to concert E. The sound is also improved as is the action. using heavy strings and tuning down also does not help the guitar as the tension is too high resulting in eventual neck bend and high action as well as bridge lift. on gibson B 45 s with tailpiece ...


1

Yes, my Alvarez Yairi does not have a truss rod, and I've used Savarez 520J high tension strings for decades without a problem. My teacher, Irvin Kauffman, recommended these strings and played for the Pittsburgh Symphony.


1

Yes, most properly-built classical guitars should handle standard high-tension strings without problem.


2

It is generally safe to use a lightly dampened rag on your fingerboard. Getting the fingerboard wet can cause problems, specifically in your fret slots where any swelling or softening of the wood may cause loose or popped frets. On a lacquered fingerboard if water gets into any chips or cracks in the lacquer it can cause lifting of the lacquer or ...


4

A damp (not wet) rag should not cause any issues with most guitars - but, it's not going to do too much, in my opinion. Most of the dirt on a fingerboard is from oil off the users fingers, so you need a (gentle) solvent to clean that off. Personally, I use Lemon Oil for that (or, in a pinch, Olive Oil)


3

I took a look at the case you are considering shipping it in which does not look substantial enough by itself to adequately protect your instrument. However, you might consider building or having built a simple wooden shipping crate that would be large enough to contain the instrument and its case together to protect your precious cargo. Pack with bubble ...


5

As Tetsujin said, rough handling is always a possibility, and I would worry about that more than about the temperature and pressure difference. So my preferred solution would be really to have it as a carry-on. I once flew with an ukulele without a problem. This was a low-cost airline of the kind which sells seats within Europe for 19 Euros, and makes its ...


9

It's always going to be a gamble. I've had a case marked fragile arrive squashed, with obvious tractor tyre marks over it. For many years after that all my cases were marked "Fragile - please throw under-arm" I'd say if the violin is worth more than a seat, buy it a seat, otherwise pack it well, check your insurance, & hope. There's always the ...


1

Personally, seeing the wires wouldn't particularly concern me - other pics I can find online of similar models (1,2) seem to also show a cheeky bit of wire peeping out. I was thinking about using a pointy blunt object to push the wires in I wouldn't do that. If it's something that you find particularly offputting in terms of presentation, you might want ...


2

This is absolutely not a problem, unless you object to the cosmetic appearance. Some pickups have that extra loop there to add extra relief to lower the risk of snapping the wires when removing/replacing pickups. If you pop the back off or remove strings and pop the pickup out, you may be able to reroute the wires if you want to. Or you could get some ...


2

Leave it alone - you'll probably break something. They're meant to be like that. Basically, that's where the coil wires are tagged onto the thicker wires needed to carry the signal off to the volume & tone pots. The short loops you can see are where the thicker wires are dropped through the pickup base to provide a stronger structure, strain relief when ...


0

A few things come to mind. Easy remedies on installing strings and concerns of breakage: First, agreeing with the above comment to 'grease' the nut groove near the scroll with a pencil (lubricating it). Also, make sure that the groove is wide enough (often not) and that it will not pinch the string just as one that is not properly lubricated. When using a ...


2

Hmmm. To do a proper fret level you need a leveling beam. First you adjust the truss rod until the neck is perfectly flat, and then you sand down the whole neck with the leveling beam (you can use a regular level, they're usually pretty straight). You mark each fret with a magic marker, and then sand until the marker is off the top of every fret. Then ...


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