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First off, I would seriously consider having it done by a professional. Violin bow rehairing can cost about $50 with cello and bass bows costing a bit more. Given that it is quite a skilfull operation, that might be a consideration worth your while because there is always a risk of damaging your bow. I would suggest, however, that if the $50 rehairing fee ...


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I have a Yamaha Bass which has always been tight at the largest fitting, and I have struggled before with it, but now I cannot separate it. It DID come with grease and I used it liberally thinking it would help and was necessary. I have run under very hot water and also tried the freezing suggestion mentioned above. Frustrated. I have tried so hard not to ...


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As posted in this article: Here's what you'll need: Horse hair (like this $7 pack on Amazon) needle-nose pliers scissors super glue gauge (like this one) thin wire wire cutters hair clips or slides comb Here's how to do it: Remove the old hair by cutting it with your scissors. Leave a few inches at each end. Using ...


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This seems like two questions in one. The intonation on a classical guitar is always going to be somewhat approximate as the saddle can be considered 'one size fits all' or 'set and forget' at best; you can't alter the individual string lengths on a classical guitar. Polishing will change the diameter of the bass strings slightly (assuming you only polish ...


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The only problem would seem to be the minor swelling of the wood from the additional humidity. The following precautions would be appropriate: de–tune each instrument by turning the tuning pegs out 1 full turn. Loosen the tension on the bows similarly. wrap each instrument in a baby blanket upon introducing the instruments to their new environment open the ...


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Unless the guitars are individually built guitars and not "shop" produced, then they likely follow standard, traditional construction. I have personally never run across building instructions that take into account different string tensions in regards to the face and bracing, although I am not a classical guitar maker, and things may have changed or be ...


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Best approach is the conservative one. Find a luthier and have them evaluate the instrument. Using high-tension strings on older instruments can possibly cause irreparable damage.


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Don't adjust your pedal technique. The noise could come from the pedal pivot, or the cup connecting the pedal to the pushrod, or one of the pushrod guides, or the pushrod-action joint, all of which are best left to a professional technician to both troubleshoot and correct. The noise could even come from the sole of your shoe on the pedal, or a creaky ...


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A small amount of mechanical noise is common, and usually easily rectifiable. Probably not worth invoking the warranty on a new piano, though it might be worth contacting the retailer and mentioning it, just to cover yourself. I wouldn't advise trying to lubricate or adjust any moving parts yourself, unless you know what you're doing (and, with respect, ...


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Well, tell the luthier all the points you have posted here and ask him to make an overall check of the violin, in case there are matters you are not aware of. That should make sure that he does look for more than what you know yourself. Regarding the bridge and fingerboard, it could be an idea to replace both, but the luthier could make an evaluation on ...


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