New answers tagged

0

It's going to affect just about everything. But to what extent, is another question. String windings that are full of dirt and dust will not sound as bright as clean ones. Rusty single strand strings (the higher part) won't vibrate as well as un-rusty ones. The felt on hammers will be affected by ingrained dirt. The moving parts (hundreds of them) won't ...


0

Not much, unless it's so extreme that it's actually impeding mechanical action. I certainly don't think you can blame dirt for a heavy bass-end action. Perhaps for ONE sticking note.


1

Saddle position to obtain correct intonation depends on several variables - gauge and tension of the string, and action. Strings that are heavier, tighter, and higher typically need a saddle that's farther back to get the intonation correct. String style can impact intonation as well - wound strings typically need different setup than plain wound strings, ...


0

It will probably work, but a rubber band or piece of string round the neck at 12th/14th fret will do just as well.


1

Intonation will only ever be exactly right when the saddle on the bridge has been adjusted for the particular string in question. Put a different gauge string there instead, and the intonation will be out. Change by .001" and you'd prbably shrug shoulders and live with it. Whilst frets (generally!) are all parallel to the nut, the line across the saddles ...


0

I've had this same problem in the past on one of my bridge saddles. My method of stopping it from happening repeatedly was to use Loctite thread dressing. I put a drop of Loctite on a disposable piece of paper, then removed the offending screw from the bridge saddle and dipped it into the drop of Loctite. With the threads of the screw still wet with Loctite, ...


1

Unless the strings or the tuning pins are damaged and need replacing, a piano can always be tuned perfectly. But the real question is: how well and how long will that piano hold the tuning? A good quality piano which is tuned regularly becomes "well conditioned" and will hold the tuning well and for a long time. On the other hand, even a good piano, if ...


1

This was answered on the Woodworking stack: getting slurry out of wood grains It's liquified sanding dust. Fine-grit paper creates tiny particles which mixed with the finish and dried into the grain.


2

Simple answer: tune it during the conditions which occur for the largest part of the year. No matter what you do, changes in temperature and humidity will change the tuning, but by and large when the conditions revert to those in place when tuned the piano will go back into tune. You are certainly correct that the ideal situation is to keep the piano ...


1

If an acoustic piano is required to play with other instruments tuned to concert pitch then it will be better to tune the piano to 440 Hz. If the piano is not going to play with other musical instruments ( other than voice ) then it can be acceptable to tune it to 432 Hz assuming the piano tuner has a 432Hz tuning fork. Next time I get my piano tuned I may ...


13

When playing period music, on period instruments, they are tuned to the standard of that time, if at all possible. Partly to be authentic, mostly to be kind to the instruments. Understandably. Given that your piano is old, thus the strings probably are too, any Hz lower than 440 will be kinder. There's no good reason to use 432Hz, though. If it was mine, I'...


23

It might extend string life, and it might make the piano sound rather dull since the strings may be designed for the tension at which A is 440 Hz or even higher. Whether it's better is a matter of opinion. The fact that Verdi used 432 Hz (if that is in fact true; this is the first I've heard of it) has very little bearing on the tuning of a piano unless it ...


Top 50 recent answers are included