New answers tagged

9

Do not touch a microphone/stand or any grounded equipment or go anywhere wet - you may die. Incidentally I had a similar sensation with my last mobile phone (a Huwawei). When it was plugged into the charger it would create a weird 'electric' feeling if I rubbed my fingers over the casing. I had it for the duration of my contract and I didn't die but I ...


17

This could be a lethal problem. It's just not safe to continue. Firstly, check the socket you usually use. Socket testers are very cheap, and worth having. When I was gigging several times a week, the first thing I would do is check the stage electrics. Several times, we had to use sockets which were not the convenient ones on stage - they were faulty - ...


3

If you have a guitar made from solid woods, and you keep it inside a hardshell case, and you have no humidity control systems inside the case, and you put the guitar in its case in an environment that is outside of about 40% - 60% relative humidity, you can notice a change in guitar geometry in as quickly as a week or two, depending on the action of the ...


38

STOP PLAYING You should not feel any electricity when playing guitar. There could be many reasons, including electrical equipment malfunction or incorrect electric installation in your room. There were accidents of electric shock from music equipment, including fatal ones. Frequent causes are malfunction of the amplifier or ground mismatch between two ...


3

As long as you don't leave the guitar under the sun, or near radiators in the winter, or in front of air conditioners in the summer, the guitar will be just fine. Even delicate instruments such as violins have survived intact for centuries, going through countless Russian winters and Italian Summers, in places that had less ability to control temperature and ...


0

Changing strings on a floating trem bridge requires never changing gauge, and changing stings fully one by one, not taking them all off. It's pretty limiting if you want to deviate then you will have to go through all these steps: blocking the trem changing strings one by one adjusting trem counter pressure


1

I've had issues like these too, the problem is u really need to use slide oil. That's the only way to solve this problem. Most harmonica comes with slide oil inside it, after using it for some time (depends on the quality of slide oil), the slide oil will run out and you'll have to apply slide oil again. That's what slide oil is for.


1

The fret wear shown in the pictures is relatively normal. On my acoustic guitars, most of my fret wear occurs under the two plain steel strings due to bare steel against softer nickel frets. On the pictured guitar the G string is plain steel and the worst of the fret wear appears under the G string. The wear pattern is consistent with a propensity to do ...


2

I don’t really get which is which when you talk about soft and hard parts. I would rather say there is a velvet side like the interior of the case, and a satin side, on which the rosin sticks less. My violin case blanket is attached to the case like the one below, so the user uses it as the case maker intended. It is made so that the velvet side (dark blue) ...


2

I have a large soft duster which I use to clean the rosin off the violin and the strings. I fold this up into a long rectangle and place it over the violin strings. I then take the violin blanket, which came with the case, and place that soft side down over the duster. The point of these measures is to protect the top of the violin, the bridge, strings and ...


-1

I can't count the number of times I've said this: you must get a teacher. Online learning will never work as well, because of issues like this. There's no "feedback" to tell you if your hand positions are correct, your bow angles are correct, your bow pressure and speed are correct, and, yes, your bow tension is proper. You shouldn't even be able to ...


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