16

What you are trying to achieve is not a trivial task. If you want a good master it'll take more than some tips. I'll try to do some quick observations on some possibilities. There's nothing specific to Ableton Live, because there's nothing exclusive to Ableton Live in this subject. You want more loudness in your track. As you might know we can't just turn ...


14

Well this is a big question, so let me start with a big answer: http://www.amazon.com/Mixing-Secrets-Small-Studio-Senior/dp/0240815807/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426508544&sr=1-1&keywords=mixing+secrets Now for the smaller answer more approriate to this format. A good mix starts with the arrangement before you even record. If the ...


8

I think the heart of the question is, which is more important: gear or skill? The answer to that question is skill is more important. Skill is the product of training, practice, and experience, and people with the highest skill levels have a great advantage in producing the best results, in any field. You specifically asked about the skills of mixing and ...


7

Matthew has provided a great answer. I want to expand a bit and look at different aspects of your question to help with some misconceptions that might be causing trouble. I would take a professionally produced song with a similar set of instruments that my song uses (or genre) and compare the frequencies through the voxengo span vst... ...Even though the ...


6

A valve and a tube are the same thing -- "tube" was originally more common in American English, while "valve" was more common in England. A "vacuum tube" is any one of a number of types of electronic component based around an arrangement of electrodes inside a sealed glass unit, from which all the air has been removed. The kind of tube used in amplification ...


6

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


6

equal looking frequency spectrum's do not mean that the sound will be perceived similarly. Dynamics, instrument separation, clashing tonal centers, there are a myriad of things responsible for how a mix is perceived that don't get translated to a frequency analyzer. (i use the same plugin too). instead, use your ears to check if the mix is sounding the way ...


6

By copy/pasting the exact same sound to two tracks then panning them hard left & right, you have in fact created a mono sound that just takes up two tracks. In stereo recording, the very definition of centre-panning is that the same sound comes at the same volume from both sides of the stereo field. The only way to perceive the attack as not centre-...


6

In general its a pretty accurate reproduction! Personally, when comparing two tracks, I don't find spectrum analyses particularly useful. It doesn't give you an entire picture, and inevitably leads to conclusions like the ones you made, that "it looks similar but sounds different". Trust your ears and build an experience of what changes in mixing lead to ...


5

I think you’ve got a few things off. First, let’s look at what you’ve got with your three guitars. Your left channel has 100% of 1, 50% of 2, and 0% of 3. Your right channel has 0% of 1, 50% of 2, and 100% of 3. Mid = L+R which means Mid will have 100% of 1, 100% of 2 and 100% of 3. Side = L-R which means side will have 100% of 1, 0% of 2, and -100% of 3....


4

This is a very long topic - there are entire university degrees on it - but key things to look at: input quality - a good mic, sound deadening in your recording room, a decent mixer etc. are essential, as the better your input sound quality the better you can build your track. A decent noise floor helps a lot understanding the frequency spectrum - work out ...


4

The only way to do this is to bounce all your tracks down, one way or another. You can export all your MIDI tracks as MIDI files which will include automated controller data. You can import these MIDI files into logic and the automation will be visible in the hyperdraw - however, for that to work you'll need to have the same AU plugins installed for logic ...


4

Turn your monitor level all the way down until you can't hear anything. Slowly turn it up. The first thing you hear as you turn up the monitors is the loudest thing in the mix.


4

The sentence preceding the use of that term explains exactly what you should do. Give them at least 3dBfs of headroom to work with. As for how to do that, I don't know what DAW you are using but it should keep track of your peaks—or the highest dBfs level that it hit—and remember them until another peak is louder. Look for a number above or around the meter ...


3

After listening to the example mix, I have a few specific comments: there's a very strong likelihood that the monitoring is deficient. It is likely very hyped in the high end, and probably has a big hole in the low mids. It's likely that you mix very loud. Your mixes have a preponderance of very broad-band "large" synths, stacked on top of each other. The ...


3

What device is indicated by 1/4" audio to USB 3.0? Do you have some kind of audio interface? That is almost definitely where your problem lies. Rarely do devices have 1/4" stereo inputs, but your Line 6 has a 1/4" stereo output. You probably have to get a splitter cable that has a male 1/4" stereo (TRS) connector on one end, and then either two male 1/4" ...


3

Of course the only way to actually make a professional sounding recording is to have it made by a team of professionals using high end equipment. But you can get fairly close without all that stuff and you can definitely make recordings that sound great. A great master relies on a great mix, and a great mix relies on great recording. So you really want to ...


3

I too am an amateur "recording engineer" from the standpoint of I record my original songs in my home studio on inexpensive gear to produce what I consider a rough demo - capable of conveying the general idea of the song. When I want a more professionally produced "radio ready" cut, I will go to a professional studio. To simplify the answer to your ...


3

There are thousands of options. Here are some: Books Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio by Mike Senior Recording Secrets for the Small Studio by Mike Senior Behind the Glass by Howard Massey Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics by Arthur Benade Handbook for Sound Engineers by Glen Ballou Here, There and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles ...


3

You can try through several mics and see what difference they make in the presence of the singer. Working with equalizers, however, results in "unnatural" sound. While microphones also influence the frequency response, they do it in a pretty consistent manner. But it sounds like what you are basically trying to do here is putting lipstick on a pig. A ...


3

Are you recording "live" or building up the song track by track (perhaps in the mistaken idea that that's the "professional" way to do it?) Can the violin player hear the singer while playing her part (and is she LISTENING?) When good musicians are playing sensitively, very little "mixing" will be needed. A real stereo recording could be great - put the ...


3

According to Wikipedia, at least two file formats exist that could have ISRCs embedded: MP3 files using IDv3 2.2 tags and broadcast wave files. While technically what Bandcamp says may be wrong, it looks like there is not one universally accepted tagging technology (APE competes with ID3), tags themselves are optional, and even when an MP3 is tagged, not ...


3

Theoretically yes, they should both give the same results. The only time the limiter should be changing the sound in any significant way is when it is reducing the volume of the peaks. Simply turning the volume down and then back up should not change the sound. You can verify that they are the same by trying the following: Mixdown your project to a stereo ...


3

I think the existing answer is good and doesn’t go far enough. First, I would suggest you put zero plugins on your master output track or stereo bus or whatever you want to call it. For two reasons: It will help you make a better mix, since you’ll have to make things work without processing on the stereo bus. It will let your mastering engineer do what ...


2

Along with filtering, EQ, and reverb (in reverse order of priority for the folk genre, probably) there is a pretty good way of creating the kind of separation you're looking for, if you aren't afraid to possibly lose some of the string 'body' if the mix ever gets played through a monaural audio system. First, copy the competing string part to two tracks [...


2

Something is sitting where vocals should be. You have to find out what it is for each part of the song. Try muting every suspect and combinations of them until you find out what is your problem. Now, for each section of the song, you must know why there is a problem. You can see mixing as organizing sound into a 3D room where the 3 axis are Panning (sides), ...


2

Although they could be multiple vocal tracks as per slim's answer, there are also dedicated effects, vocal harmonic processors, that automatically reharmonize sounds including singing. The can come as dedicated effects units, e.g. the DigiTech Vocalist Live 3 , or software modules, e.g. Antares Harmony Engine Evo. Most of the units for vocal processing ...


2

In order to make a vocalist stand out in the mix, you need to do the following: Use a Compressor on the vocal track, with a hard compression ratio. This is realy an essential step in any vocal track. Just be sure to also put a Noise gate to eliminate the parts where the singer is quiet. EQ on the vocal track: using good reference speakers, it is your goal ...


2

Here's what I woud try : 1) Eq - if you can reduce the more piercing tones of the violin (upper midrange?) it'll allow the voice to prod through a bit. This is probably simplest to try if you have parametric eq on your mixer. 2) Panning violins to each side - as Todd Wilcox suggested this can result in the violins still being 'in the mix' but the vocals ...


2

The 3D placement is just playing with EQ, volume and reverb. This wont give you a perfect 3D effect but it will work. In general remember those rules. EQ: The farther the sound the less high frequencies it will have (so maybe use a low pass filter) REVERB: the farther the sound the more wet signal you'll ear, less early reflections and less pre-delay (when ...


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