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Why can't drums produce melody?

Instruments don't just produce one frequency at a time. When you play a single note on a melodic instruments (like piano, wind instruments, string instruments, etc.), you produce many different ...
jdjazz's user avatar
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51 votes

Why can't drums produce melody?

The drums CAN play melodies, but the number of pitches and notes you have available are limited by the number of drums you have (not counting creative applications of "bending" the drum head to ...
Tekkerue's user avatar
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23 votes
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Does the starting note for a song have to be the starting note of its scale?

Does a scale always have to start off with the note it is named after? A scale is a collection of notes with one of those notes designated as the 'home note'. When you're playing that scale in a ...
Нет войне's user avatar
21 votes

Why can't drums produce melody?

No-one's mentioned pans - aka steel drums They certainly are used to play melodies. The main problem is that melodies usually contain long and short duration notes, and drums generally can only ...
Tim's user avatar
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20 votes
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What do you call it when someone sings a melody and simultaneously plays the exact same melody?

It's called doubling. The term is correctly used in the OP: in the intro to "Crosstown Traffic", Jimi doubles the vocal melody on guitar (or the guitar melody on voice). For example: When ...
Aaron's user avatar
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18 votes
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Would the melodic leap of the opening phrase of Mozart's K545 be considered dissonant?

There are at least two explanations for why this leap is acceptable: First is the idea of "gap fill," also sometimes called "registral return" or the "post-skip reversal." In short, when there is a ...
Richard's user avatar
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17 votes

If we play a melody backward will its characteristics be the same?

In general (as already noted), yes. Not always. Other transformations have been used. Besides playing backwards, a melody may be "inverted" about an axis. The simplest is the axis around the first ...
ttw's user avatar
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17 votes
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D major with no C tone

Great question! For the task "figure out what key this melody is in," there's no one simple, foolproof way. Instead, we can add up a lot of clues to come to some degree of certainty. First, ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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16 votes
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Can two songs share the same melodic notes but still have distinct melodies?

As has been described, it's not especially difficult to recompose a melody to make it unrecognizable as having been copied from some other song. I did this for the question How to write music if you ...
Aaron's user avatar
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15 votes
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what are the characteristics that define a "good" melody?

It does depend on the style of music, but generally speaking I think there are good rules of thumb which will yield good results in most styles. Keep it easy to sing and easy to remember. You want ...
ibonyun's user avatar
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15 votes

If we play a melody backward will its characteristics be the same?

It's impossible to generalize on such a topic, but I would venture that yes, in some cases, in certain portions, some of the aesthetic value of a melody will somehow remain if the melody is reversed. ...
MMazzon's user avatar
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15 votes

How do I know what patterns to play under a melody?

This is where your musicianship skills become useful. (Or where you realise you need some!) Write down the melody and show it to us as notation. Then we know what we're talking about. Hint: You'll ...
Laurence's user avatar
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13 votes

Sources of musical tension

The pause is one that comes straight to mind - the rhythm stops, and everything hangs for some moments. Rubato has a similar effect, as do rallentando and accelerando. Crescendo and decrescendo can ...
Tim's user avatar
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13 votes

Should melody avoid nonchord tones since they are disonant?

The WHOLE point in melodies is to produce tension and release. How do you expect to produce any tension when the notes are all consonant - as in they all fit nicely? By using notes that ARE dissonant, ...
Tim's user avatar
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12 votes

Eartraining: What to learn after mastering interval recognition?

(This could be closed as opinion-based, but I also think there's only one answer...) Learn scale-degree functions. Each scale degree has its own particular function, and therefore its own particular ...
Richard's user avatar
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12 votes
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E# in Brothers in Arms by Dire Straits

There is no E# in the G# minor scale, but there is one in the D# minor scale. If you look at the chord that is being played, you'll see it's just a D# minor chord. So I think the best way of viewing ...
Ramillies's user avatar
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12 votes

If we play a melody backward will its characteristics be the same?

Yes, and no! There are times in melodies where certain note sequences are what make the melody what it is. Reversing it will change that effect. Take for example the penultimate bar of a tune, the ...
Tim's user avatar
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12 votes

Does lack of sleep impact on matching pitch and singing well?

I think it's a given that fatigue will affect ANY skill, mental or physical. So yes, it's normal. Having said that, one definition of a professional is someone who performs competently even on a bad ...
Laurence's user avatar
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11 votes

Why is the tune of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star used everywhere?

The melody is from a French song, Ah! vous dirai-je, maman The first known publishing of the melody dates from 1761, who knows how much further back it goes. Mozart wrote some variations based on ...
Some_Guy's user avatar
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11 votes

What do you call this alternating melodic pattern?

If the entire figure repeated exactly, then it would be an ostinato, the term that endorph used. But the extract in the OP does not show such a repeat. What we have is a pedal (in the repeating lower ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 5,192
11 votes

Why can't drums produce melody?

In contrast to the question, the timpani are a drum set that can play melodies (although they are almost always given accompaniment parts only). Indeed, they are tuned to pitches (one pitch per drum) ...
Dekkadeci's user avatar
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11 votes

Writing a melody that forms second harmonies with a chord progression

As a beginner, or as an extremely experienced player/writer, you're allowed to do just what the heck you like. There are 'rules' - more like guidelines, or things that are known to work/not work well. ...
Tim's user avatar
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11 votes

If we play a melody backward will its characteristics be the same?

This is basically one of the four tenets of contrapuntal harmony. Prime, Inversion, Retrograde and Retrograde-Inversion as it is made perfect in the Well-Tempered Clavier and in the Art of Fugue.. ...
Neil Meyer's user avatar
11 votes

Should melody avoid nonchord tones since they are disonant?

No. Dissonance is good. It allows us to resolve to consonance. Or not. An unresolved dissonance can sound interesting. 'Theory' describes what you've done. It doesn't tell you WHAT to do. (Well, ...
Laurence's user avatar
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10 votes

Are modes in jazz primarily a melody thing?

The simple/traditional approach is for the chords to match the scales you're improvising over. You wouldn't improvise with C Lydian in your right hand and simultaneously play a CMaj11 chord--the F in ...
jdjazz's user avatar
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10 votes

How to convert what I'm singing to notes

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
10 votes
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Standard or fundamental melodic patterns

I am wondering if there are similar guides/platitudes/clichés/etc. for melodies. Yes. They may not be interesting to see when written out as abstractions. But patterns like... ^3 ^2 ^1 ^1 ^5 ^6 ^5 ^...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
10 votes

Can this Arabic scale be described in Western terms?

There are two instruments in this recording. In the left channel is a Greek bouzouki, which is a fretted instrument, tuned in typical Western fashion (12 tempered semitones). In the right channel ...
MMazzon's user avatar
  • 6,339
10 votes
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What is the terminology for these two techniques on piano?

Ievan Polkka There are two things happening here: In the preceding section, the left hand is playing pairs of notes simultaneously. However, beginning at 2:03, the left hand plays broken chords. ...
Aaron's user avatar
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