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1

Endings are almost always clausulas and formulas, they will always be redundant, trivial and common practice. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clausula_(music) But if you are looking of more dissonance try out the tritonus substitution of the V7-I (G7-C): Db7 - C maj7 or instead of the blues ending C7 once you play G7,+5,b9 - C7,9,13


2

Yes, you probably could. When I was a student at London's Royal Academy of Music my pastoral tutor was a lady called Margaret Hubicki. I didn't know it at the time, but she invented the 'Colour-staff' system of notation, aimed at helping people with dyslexia read music. Seems similar to what you're asking for. If they could do it, I expect you can too. ...


1

The answer is no; the style of scat singing in unison along with an instrumental solo, or doubling it at an octave (like George Benson) does not have a specific, concise name (as far as I can tell).


5

In the case where an instrumentalist doubles their own improvisation with voice, there is not a specific term. Slam Stewart made his name doubling his bass in this way, having gotten the idea from Ray Perry, who did the same in his violin solos (recording not readily available). In general, it's considered something of a novelty. Some musicians famously ...


0

There is no such thing as "the right way of making music". Everytime someone tries to impose a rule about music composition, this rule is broken or will be broken. It's just a matter of time. Trust your ears. Songwriting is but a work of Decision Making. You listen, you like it/deslike it, then you keep it or change it. If you liked, you bet ...


4

I’m having trouble hearing these resolutions unless it’s a resolution into the tonic For the most part this IS what tendency tones do, they resolve to the tones of the tonic chord. The tones involving the half steps are the real strong tendencies. TI up to DO and FA down to MI. Those movements imply a dominant chord moving to the tonic. You can fill in the ...


0

It might help to read up on basic music theory and harmony theory. From a guitar perspective most books will go through what are called chord scales. Every note on the major scale can be harmonized by one of three chords, the I, IV, and V or V7. There are other chords but from a functional point of view they are just extensions or subs for the three ...


1

I guess you want to adjust the song to your voice range, while preserving the original key. So what you really want to do is compose a new melody for the song. There are several approaches, depending on what elements of the original melody you want to preserve You propose to shift the melody by a fixed number of semitones. This won't work, unless you shift ...


1

This a rather complicated question with a broad scope. The question is really how to compose a melody that fits against a given one. It's not as easy as (for example) singing or playing a fixed interval from the given melody. That could be done, but it tends to sound the group is singing with a thick texture rather than like an interesting embellishment on ...


3

It really doesn't work like that. You can change the key by a number of semitones, and sing the same intervals successively, but that's not what you are asking. You seem to be asking about harmony. Which isn't another voice so many semitones away, singing parallel. The intervals change constantly. Do that and you will sound out of tune with people singing in ...


0

...make chords and melody work together... Chords with melody. That is a simple definition of homophonic texture. My opinion seems to differ from many people on this forum, but in homophonic style harmony is the foundational element. The harmony is often an abstract structural thing, but it's still the foundation. A writer may start with a melody, but ...


0

Another thing you can do is transcribe music in the genre which you are trying to compose. This will demonstrate what other composers have done and what a melody sounds like over chords. If a note doesn't sound right over a chord than change it. Trust your ears to guide you, but listen and learn from other composers.


0

To answer the first question - let your melodies go in whatever direction they want. It doesn't need to fit neatly into accenting on the 1st and 3rd beat(in a standard 4/4 time signature). Being different and original is what makes it special and unique. Just as long as it sounds good to you. In your second question, often when played fluently, the ...


1

The solution to your problem is quite simple. The reason is: When you play the clashing tones you are concentrated on this clashing sound and you try to avoid this clash like you describe it, but then you aren‘t satisfied anymore about the arpeggios and the chord sound. Good music is living from consonances and dissonances. Don‘t care about the rules of ...


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