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A good exercise for this is to consider the chord formed when the note is put over all 12 possible chord roots. With C as an example, C as the root makes any kind of C chord. D♭ as the root means maj7 chords, and maybe m(maj7) chords. D means m7 and 7 chords, E♭ means 6 chords, 13th chords. You see where this is going, and the possibilities are limited only ...


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I would suggest that the question relies on a false (actually "incomplete") assumption. Notes and chords (in most music) are not isolated entities. There is a context (rhythm, melody, harmony) which affects the relation between a melody note and possible chords. This is a big topic and one learns it gradually by study, listening, playing, and composing. (I ...


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Finding or generating chords that have a given note is not rocket science and is IMO a basic skill you should have. But here's a "tool" that's "online" and is not an external resource. You can save or print out an offline version. I generated the list with a Python script (code included at the end) and the music21 library. There may be errors. Sharps only ...


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you're searching the root tone of your song? It doesn't make much sense to identify the key from a single starting point, as it can be actually the root tone, the 3rd, 5th (up-beat) or any an approach-note. You'll be more successful by identifying the final chord (here the the final tone is usually the root tone) or the chord of the first measure (but also ...


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If you're talking about left hand notes in between playing the chords, there are a couple of things you can try: 1) Arpeggiate the chords as you play them--play the notes of the chords in various order in a faster rhythm than the melody rather than playing them all at once. 2) As long as you stay in the same key, going up or down the scale stepwise from ...


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A song is in a certain key. There is a scale of that key. If the key is C major, the scale is C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. We can form chords from those notes. The most common ones are triads - the ones fingered 1, 3, 5. That's C major - C, E, G. D minor - D, F, A. E minor - E, G, B etc. For 'in-between' notes stick to the notes of the basic scale. ...


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This seems to be a question about chord-scale theory. This theory states that each chord has a scale that it belongs to. If the song is relevively simple, all of the chords will belong to the same key, mealing that if you play any notes from that scale, the melody will sound "good". Looking deeper, if we assign each note in a scale a number or degree we can ...


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