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I dislike most claims of absolutes in music. Virtually anything you can do in or with music can have some sort of justification in it's use. Then even if you can find no theoretical justification for it, you can still use it and possibly make great music with it. There simply is no rules, there are some common practices though. People must understand for ...


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The chart you show is only telling half the story. Intervals are more than just a certain number of semitones between two notes. But that's all the chart tells. Intervals also need the names of the two notes - or where they're written on the staff. True, each interval will have at least a couple of names - we could even stretch that top one to augmented ...


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In a non-tempered tuning, the intervals C-G# and C-Ab are not identical. (Voices, and strings, and some other instruments will often produce different sounds for these intervals.) With the interval C-G#, the spelling is that of a fifth and the # indicates that the fifth is augmented (perfect intervals only have augmented and diminished versions). The ...


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C to G♯ is an augmented fifth. Mostly you'll have C to A♭, though, and it will be a minor sixth. In other words, the spelling matters. The fact that it would be an augmented or diminished interval if it were spelled differently isn't particularly relevant. What matters is whether it's an augmented or diminished interval when it's spelled correctly.


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This is a little hard to answer, because Hindemith was (somewhat famously) idiosyncratic, inconsistent, and unclear with his own theories and analyses. But I’ll answer the best I can. Throughout this answer, I’ll reference three texts in addition to Hindemith’s own Craft of Musical Composition (Unterweising im Tonsatz): The Music of Paul Hindemith by David ...


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But in descending motion from the tonic, is it okay for the 7th scale degree to resolve to the 6th (i.e. 8-7-6)? Not all motion is resolution. It's perfectly fine to have an 8-7-6 melody in which the 7the degree moves to the 6th, but you wouldn't normally say that the 7th degree resolves to the 6th. Either the motion from 7 to 6 is not a resolution or the ...


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I think the basic theory idea you are looking for is that each tone of a diatonic scale (exluding TI and MI) can be chromatically altered, raised a half step, to become a temporary leading tone to the diatonic tone above. And importantly, only that one altered tone is needed to create the secondary dominants. These alterations can be inserted into ordinary ...


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I think you want to distinguish progressions that exemplify tendency tone movements from other kinds of harmonic movement and also whether the tones are real chord tones rather than embellishing tones. Tendency tones like the following are mostly about tonic/dominant progressions... ...^7 the leading tone moves up to the tonic, because the progression is I ...


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Melody trumps everything else. Even in the walled garden of hymn-tune style SATB writing, a strong melodic line excuses a multitude of sins. In the wider musical world, leading notes regularly go just about anywhere of course.


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The rule of resolving the leading tone upwards concerns the progression V-I and V7-I, vii-I, vii dim7-I (dominant-tonic). Exception: in the middle voices the leading tone may go downwards to the 5th in purpose to have a full chord. (s. example of link user 45266.) There are other cases where we have other harmonic progressions like iii-IV, V-IV, V7/vi-vi ...


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In particular situations, this 8–7–6 line in either of the outer voices is acceptable. When harmonizing a melody with I–iii–IV, this 8–7–6 melody line is very common; see "Puff the Magic Dragon." Part of the reason this works is that the 7 here isn't really a leading tone in the same sense that it is when 7 is harmonized with V. The iii chord doesn'...


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I'd say not particularly. As a bass player, I may play several completely different basslines under the same melody/chords. Where would that leave you? The melody of most songs has a greater affinity to the underlying chords at any point - usually there will be at least a couple of melody notes which are found in the chord at the time. This helps a lot, as ...


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Eh... no. Specifically: no, I would not consider that to be a violation of the rule. I don't know about what your learning resources are going to say about this, but back when I learned this stuff, that walkdown from tonic to fifth was a specifically listed exception to the leading tone "rule" in voice-leading. In general, though, leading tone ...


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I think it really depends on how you define "simple" in terms of this inner-voice chromatic line. It sounds as if you're equating simplicity with smoothness—that is, how much a line moves. Since the line consistently moves the smallest interval in common Western music, the half step, the line therefore must be simple. But I would argue the opposite:...


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There is a free app called TE Tuner, available in the Apple and Google play store. This app has a function called Analysis which displays pitch, and another function called Sound - which will display the key of whatever ‘sound’ it hears. HTH Catz


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"Red" measures The primary observation is that there is a two-beat pattern moving down in whole steps. So, following your lead from C#7, the chord two beats later would be B7, and then, again two beats later, A7. From there, a variety of options exist. Following the C#7, we have a delayed Gx, a Dx, which clearly sounds like a "leading" ...


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Generally, (at least in my opinion), an ornamented melody should be harmonized like the unornamented version. The point is to emphasize the ornamented quality. The rhythmic structure of that harmony may change; if the melody moves more quickly with ornaments (as with division technique), the movement in the harmony may proceed in slower notes. Sixteenth ...


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