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23

There might be many different reasons for different bands. So I will be able to point just some possibilities. Studio recording and live performance are different ways to present the songs. Recordings are being listened to in a different way than live songs. Different techniques might be appropriate for each of them. In particular, at the end of the song the ...


18

What @user13423 wrote is right, but I think maybe it doesn't really answer what you're really asking. So allow me to elaborate. There are two fundamental relationships to music: that of being audience, and that of being performer. All performing musicians are putting on a show. Performance is the making of an illusion, of casting a glamour on the ...


16

I think this is a pretty common problem. There are lots of guitarist that have plenty of technical chops as well as theory knowledge, but are unable to create actually musical solos. A big part of the problem is thinking too small-scale: noodling around in a loop may indeed end up with a short snippet that sounds pretty cool, but often no way to go any ...


16

I have to say that I don't know much about heavy metal, but this sounds like what I imagine to be death metal. I did a bit of searching on that premise, and I found one site that classifies (I think) this band as "Epic/Medieval Black Metal." I do know a bit about medieval music, although I'm no expert, and this sounds almost nothing like medieval ...


16

There are two different ways this can be done: a) The band plays at a quieter and quieter dynamic level, until none of the players can be heard anymore (over the crowd etc. noise). There are a couple of problems with this: Playing quieter almost inevitably also changes other aspects of one's playing.What and how exactly depends on the instrument and the ...


15

(Just in case of any confusion, this answer was originally in response to a duplicate question about pinch harmonics used by Billy Gibbons of ZZTop - thanks for the merge, Dr Mayhem!) These are probably pinch harmonics. In which case, they are not produced by a particular amp or effects setting, but are produced by the picking hand while playing (although ...


15

Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. I want to preface this answer by saying that metal is not an 'easy' genre to play well. As danmcb mentions, many many metal musicians are highly competent... and even formidable in their technical prowess. It is a bit of a misconception that metal is an 'easy genre to play' considering a good portion of casual ...


14

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


14

I agree with the comments that this sounds vanishingly little like actual medieval music. However, it does have some elements that can be loosely associated with medieval music -- church music in particular -- combined with modern movie-soundtrack conceptions of how best to accompany medieval battle scenes. Unison vocals accompanied (in unison) by ...


13

In my experience, here's what jazz performance auditions usually consist of: play a standard 12 bar blues (usually in F, and it would help if you know this form--shown here in the key of C) play another song (sometimes of your choosing, sometimes of their choosing) For jazz bass, "playing" these songs could include any of the following: playing the melody ...


13

I have seen bands do fade-outs live, and I have played in bands that did fade-outs live. So it does happen. Exhibit A: Why does it not happen more often? It's hard to do convincingly, for one thing. The musicians will need to play softer and softer until they are essentially playing silently. Most electric instruments ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


11

You are not doing anything wrong, being creative, improvising and composing ideas can be very difficult. It one of the things that takes musicians the longest amount of time to get good at. When I come across someone who is struggling with creativity I like to pass on a 3 word phrase that is associated with the late great Clark Terry, one of the finest and I ...


11

They don't fade out in the studio. They keep playing in the studio. The engineer just slides the fader. Thus "fade out". A sound man can do that to a band, if the band has no acoustic drums and go thru D/I instead of amplifiers. Most bands hate playing like that, but sometimes that's what you can do. But no band wants to be controlled by the ...


10

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


9

A seven string guitar might have longer scale length to accommodate lower tunings. A six stringed guitar can usually be made to handle B tuning, but there might be intonation issues, especially with Gibson measure, which is 24.75". If one wants to go lower, a longer scale is preferred. That can be another benefit with a seven string guitar. Seven string ...


9

"Technicality" tends to be related to skills in execution. Focusing on technicalities detracts from expressiveness. For the listener, noticing random aberrations also detracts from expressiveness which are, in a manner, deliberate aberrations from a mechanical execution. "Technicality" does not distract a listener. But when it occupies the attention of ...


9

It's trivially easy to play a fade-out 'live', particularly if everything is going through a mixing desk. We don't do it, because the audience need an ending so they know when to applaud. Audiences LIKE to applaud a song. They feel cheated if they're not given an opportunity. When a well-known song ends on a fade, backing tracks made for cabaret singers ...


8

Seems that you are new to the whole synthesis thing and you are looking for specific sounds found in other songs, so I recommend you to start with a software synthesizer that has a big and good library and macro support/dynamics. The library will let you choose from an array of well-organized pre-programmed sounds, and the macros will let you tweak those ...


8

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


8

In general, your technique isn't going to be fundamentally different than if you are alternate picking, and general good picking technique will apply: Keep your right hand and arm relaxed Hold the pick loosely Move your hand in parallel with the strings (i.e. don't scoop) Monitor your pick strokes to ensure that there is no wasted motion Monitor the tone of ...


8

I have my main gigging 7-string guitar tuned to A-D-A-D-G-B-E, which gives me the benefits of a normal Drop-D tuned 6 string, with a duplicated AD AD at the bottom end, which allows for some very full octave barre chords. Where this really comes into its own is three areas: Covering some of the bass range - when the bass is doing something else, I can step ...


8

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


8

I'm glad you asked this question. There's definitely a lot to know about the world of guitars, and just by immersing yourself and asking questions just like this one, you will learn it over time. First of all, an acoustic guitar and electric guitar do the same thing. They make guitar sounds. You can play any genre on either, but most typically you will hear ...


8

Back in the days of yore, you'd hear about a new synth because you read the music mags, or you heard an artist who explained in some NME article what gear they had. Armed with this limited information, you'd drag yourself to the biggest music shop you could get to & see what they had to play with in the store. You'd twiddle some dials & try to get an ...


8

That tempo is, arguably, too fast to count (is a bit above 10 notes per second). But you don't need to literally count (out loud or otherwise) to hear whether you played 2, 3, 4, or more notes... you need to train your ear on what groupings of 2, 3, 4, or more notes sound like. You need to become familiar with these rhythms at a slower tempo, a tempo where ...


7

You have summed it up pretty well. Normally a 7 string guitar will have an extra low B string under the low E. This can be useful for rock and metal because you can add extra low metal tonalities to your power chords without having to tune your whole guitar lower. I'm primarily a jazz player and I have always wanted an extra high A string for better soloing ...


7

Break up the rhythm into simple parts, and practice them individually. Ramp up the tempo so you can eventually play each independent part at a high speed (faster than what you will eventually play with parts combined). Combine parts and keep the tempo down. If, at any point, you're struggling with a certain part, go back to step 2. Playing all parts, ...


7

Ever heard the old joke about the farmer being asked how to get to a nearby famous landmark? There are a hundred versions of it, but there's one commonality... His reply is always, "Well, you don't want to start from here…" The thing about GAS* is that it's the wrong place to start. You have a Strat - live with it for now. When you get 'good' you'll know ...


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