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18

What @user13423 wrote is right, but I think maybe it doesn't really answer what you're really asking. So allow me to elaborate. There are two fundamental relationships to music: that of being audience, and that of being performer. All performing musicians are putting on a show. Performance is the making of an illusion, of casting a glamour on the ...


15

For goodness' sake, get thee to a voice instructor! Rock/blues stars who appear to be screaming and shredding their vocal cords have taken many lessons in how to produce that sound structure without actually stressing their throat. (or their career is less than a couple years long :-( ).


14

(Just in case of any confusion, this answer was originally in response to a duplicate question about pinch harmonics used by Billy Gibbons of ZZTop - thanks for the merge, Dr Mayhem!) These are probably pinch harmonics. In which case, they are not produced by a particular amp or effects setting, but are produced by the picking hand while playing (although ...


14

Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. I want to preface this answer by saying that metal is not an 'easy' genre to play well. As danmcb mentions, many many metal musicians are highly competent... and even formidable in their technical prowess. It is a bit of a misconception that metal is an 'easy genre to play' considering a good portion of casual ...


13

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


13

In my experience, here's what jazz performance auditions usually consist of: play a standard 12 bar blues (usually in F, and it would help if you know this form--shown here in the key of C) play another song (sometimes of your choosing, sometimes of their choosing) For jazz bass, "playing" these songs could include any of the following: playing the melody ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


10

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


9

A seven string guitar might have longer scale length to accommodate lower tunings. A six stringed guitar can usually be made to handle B tuning, but there might be intonation issues, especially with Gibson measure, which is 24.75". If one wants to go lower, a longer scale is preferred. That can be another benefit with a seven string guitar. Seven string ...


9

"Technicality" tends to be related to skills in execution. Focusing on technicalities detracts from expressiveness. For the listener, noticing random aberrations also detracts from expressiveness which are, in a manner, deliberate aberrations from a mechanical execution. "Technicality" does not distract a listener. But when it occupies the attention of ...


8

Seems that you are new to the whole synthesis thing and you are looking for specific sounds found in other songs, so I recommend you to start with a software synthesizer that has a big and good library and macro support/dynamics. The library will let you choose from an array of well-organized pre-programmed sounds, and the macros will let you tweak those ...


8

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


8

In general, your technique isn't going to be fundamentally different than if you are alternate picking, and general good picking technique will apply: Keep your right hand and arm relaxed Hold the pick loosely Move your hand in parallel with the strings (i.e. don't scoop) Monitor your pick strokes to ensure that there is no wasted motion Monitor the tone of ...


8

I have my main gigging 7-string guitar tuned to A-D-A-D-G-B-E, which gives me the benefits of a normal Drop-D tuned 6 string, with a duplicated AD AD at the bottom end, which allows for some very full octave barre chords. Where this really comes into its own is three areas: Covering some of the bass range - when the bass is doing something else, I can step ...


8

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


7

You have summed it up pretty well. Normally a 7 string guitar will have an extra low B string under the low E. This can be useful for rock and metal because you can add extra low metal tonalities to your power chords without having to tune your whole guitar lower. I'm primarily a jazz player and I have always wanted an extra high A string for better soloing ...


7

Break up the rhythm into simple parts, and practice them individually. Ramp up the tempo so you can eventually play each independent part at a high speed (faster than what you will eventually play with parts combined). Combine parts and keep the tempo down. If, at any point, you're struggling with a certain part, go back to step 2. Playing all parts, ...


7

Ever heard the old joke about the farmer being asked how to get to a nearby famous landmark? There are a hundred versions of it, but there's one commonality... His reply is always, "Well, you don't want to start from here…" The thing about GAS* is that it's the wrong place to start. You have a Strat - live with it for now. When you get 'good' you'll know ...


7

I'm glad you asked this question. There's definitely a lot to know about the world of guitars, and just by immersing yourself and asking questions just like this one, you will learn it over time. First of all, an acoustic guitar and electric guitar do the same thing. They make guitar sounds. You can play any genre on either, but most typically you will hear ...


6

I think you will be hard-pressed to find someone willing to endorse screaming as a viable means of sustainable vocal production. Screaming is hurtful to the vocal folds. The reason why your voice gives out is because your vocal folds are inflamed from the screaming and cannot continue to resonate properly enough to sustain vocal production. This is why ...


6

When you think "evil" and "bass guitar" the brand that immediately comes to mind is BC Rich: These guys practically invented the ultra-spiky death metal instrument look. If you want to look the part, get a BC Rich. If you don't go this route, look at some of the more out-there Ibanezes; their basses are usually the more conservative Gibson- or Fender-esque ...


6

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


5

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


5

There are a few examples of screaming in Western classical music, but only as a coloristic effect; I am not aware of any compositions where it is used on a sustained basis the way it is in heavy metal. Some of these are when the music imitates styles such as blues or rock. Some examples: There are some primal screams in the first movement of Orff's ...


5

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


5

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


5

A seven string guitar is not needed. There are bariton guitars that are specifically made for lower tunings. Detuning a normal six string guitar is also very common. Since detuning usually means putting thicker strings on the guitar, one thing to look out for is the nut. The slots might need to be widened to accommodate the thicker strings. Another issue ...


5

Wow - that song has a ton of words! And as you said, there is not really a chorus that repeats over and over. This one would be a challenge for anyone and it will take some persistent practice. Storing these lyrics into long term memory will best be accomplished by spacing the learning process over a longer period of time rather than cramming it in in a ...


5

Normal bass is a full octave below a guitar. So if you're playing drop G on a 7 or 8 string, you're pretty close to the bottom of a standard 4 string bass. A 5 string bass will have a low B. So the simplest answer is that they're already there. However, that really only accounts for the pitch of the instrument. There are two other things to account for: ...


5

The tritone steps from the major scale's 7th degree up to the 4th degree note in the next octave, a common interval. If there was a dominant seventh chord i.e. V7 backing that melody interval, the jump would be from the chord's third to its seventh note, outlining the chord nicely. There's actually a vi minor, but the melody line still outlines a dominant ...


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