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34

Yes, one possible way is to clarify a "5+3" meter throughout. Depending on the music, this could be preferable to just writing 8/4 if the meter is clearly a 5+3 layout. As one example of how this could be done, consider something like: Notice that, in the second full measure, a dotted barline shows the distinction between the 5/4 and 3/4 portions of the ...


18

They are not very much alike, and cannot often (if ever!) be used interchangeably. So, the question itself is under false premises. 3/4 is 3 beats of one crotchet each. Counted 1&2&3& 1&2&3& etc. 6/8 is 6 beats of one quaver each. Counted as 123456 123456 etc. 3/4 therefore is simple - it could be 1 2 3 1 2 3. 6/8 is compound, as ...


16

This very much depends on what tradition you're working in, what information you're trying to convey, and who will be reading it. As many other answers have noted, the "feel" of the two meters is often thought to be different. This is because 6/8, in traditions that rely on sheet music written in the western style, is nearly universally interpreted as two ...


15

One way which is possible is to show two time signatures, as here from Tchaikovsky's second String Quartet via Popflock: This warns the user that bars of each length are to be expected. You haven't tagged the question MuseScore, but MuseScore does allow bars of varying length without having to put a time signature in every time. Right-click the bar, select ...


13

As a possible alterative to Richard's answer, you can write the total in the time signature and the division above the staff like this: This may be easier, depending on the capabilities of your notation software. However, it does imply that the divisions are the fundamental beats. In this case that is four beats to the bar, with beats 1, 2, and 4 being ...


6

Does it need classification? Why does everything have to be pigeon-holed? 5/4 (and 5/8 for that matter) is generally split into a more manageable 2 and 3, or 3 and 2. Not very often is it counted as a simple 5 with no sub pulse. That may be because humans are happier with basic counts of 2s and 3s. After all, most of our (Western) music falls into that ...


6

Most of the mixed-meter scores I've seen use non-dotted measure lines as well (and no "+" sign between the paired meter notations.) . It's just treated as "we will always be switching meter every bar" . See for example West Side Story "America" where it goes into 6/8-3/4 swap time.


5

If you have a strong enough 4/4 mindset you can impose it on this piece I suppose! But I really think you ARE imposing it. Maybe MY knowledge of how it's notated is affecting my perception. But I think the slurs, to mention just one element, work against your hypothesis. I think the music is intended to depict a relaxed stroll around the exhibition, ...


5

We may miss some details depending on the particular musical example, but in general these indications are telling you two things: the meter and the tempo. In 4 quarter = 126 This is saying that the meter is "in 4"; in other words, you should conceptualize each measure as having four beats. Furthermore, the quarter note will appear at a tempo of 126 ...


5

I should just rename myself "Mr.Dolmetsch Quoter" in music, there are three kinds of meter: simple in simple meter, each beat is normally subdivided into two parts, and the note receiving the beat is always a standard note value (i.e. a crotchet (quarter note), etc.) compound in compound meter, each beat is normally subdivided into ...


4

It's a convention that 6/8 is different from 3/4. Historically, time signatures represented tempo as well as note arrangement. A 3/4 time signature represents 3 beats in a measure using a quarter-note as a single beat. A 6/8 time signature represents 2 beats in a measure divided into triplets (else one could use 2/4). To hear the difference, try a waltz (...


4

Almost all uses of the time signatures 3/8, 6/8, 9/8, etc. are due to a flaw in the notation for time signatures: there is no way to indicate that a dotted note has the beat. If 3/4 were written 3/♩ then 6/8 would be written 2/♩. and they could both be interpreted in the same way: 3/♩ would mean that the measure is divided into 3 beats and each of those ...


4

What we hear and how we're interpreting a theme is not only depending of the measure and the rhythm, also from the slurs and the intervals of a motive. That is: the motive is a combination of rhythm and melody and the whole is more then the sum of it's elements. In yours example our brain or our mind is misguiding us. It is quite obvious that the motive ...


3

If you study the timings of human players, you will notice that they almost never play mechanically exactly what the theoretical written values would be. Timings, pitches, dynamics, everything. Musical notation is a means of written communication about musical ideas from humans to humans. It's meant to be subjectively interpreted by a performer. Exact ...


3

When I imagine the tune in my head I always mistakenly drop the third beat of the first bar. That results in 10 beats rather than 11. 10 is divisible by 2 and the tune without that third note fits into nice two note groups. Of course that is a mistake on my part, but it gives me the impression that the music is in 2/4. My memory is that I was surprised when ...


3

The rhythm of this melody does not strongly indicate a time signature, so if the rhythm was played robotically on a snare drum, it might be hard to find the downbeat. On the other hand, the melodic contour is very strong - it starts low, goes up, and comes back down, and this exact melody is repeated. When you combine the melodic contour with the strong/...


3

If you really want to go full math-rock, you could always put notes on the beats given by floor( sqrt(2) * n), for n = 1, 2, 3, ... This will generate notes on beats 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, ... X: 1 K: Cmaj M: L: 1/4 A A z A A z A A A z A A z A A A z A A z A Mathematically, it can be proven that this pattern will never ...


2

There is no short list of most popular meters, but what there is is all the existing music and lyrics in the genre that you want to write for. If you’re not already someone who sings, learn to sing. Pay attention to the meter and prosody of the songs that you love. You will probably find that meter is not actually consistent through the verses of many songs....


2

I'm not sure if you've found your way with lyrical/poetic meter yet, but if you haven't, I suggest practicing syllabic verse poetry, and then after you've gotten the hang of that, accentual syllabic verse poetry. Writing syllabic verse poetry will train you to gain the ability to write lines of lyrics that have exactly the desired amount of syllables. The ...


1

Regardless of how the notes in 5/4 are grouped, I believe 5/4 is a simple meter because its quarter notes are divided into 8th-note duplets. A quintuple-meter respective compound meter is 15/8, with 5 dotted-quarter-note beats made of 8th-note triplets.


1

Benrg's answer is really the correct one here, but I'd like to add a little historical perspective on why this convention exists. 3/4 meter generally represents 3 beats to a measure, where a quarter note is the primary beat. 6/8 generally represents 2 beats to a measure, where a dotted quarter is the primary beat. To understand why this happened, it's ...


1

In my experience working with dancers, they usually count quarter notes, so it would be more like 8/4 than 8/8. But the choreographer determines the counting themselves - they aren't referring to the score, so they will choose whichever pulse they feel regardless of what is notated. Lastly, the reason that they count in groups of eight is because most ...


1

McGlynn's piece is indeed a fine specimen of additive rhythm, that is, rhythmic organization where the basic beat is fixed but the groupings are or variable length, as is traditional in some African and Eastern European music. Irregularly alternating groups of 2 and 3 form the most common type of additive rhythm, for subtle perceptual reasons (a group of 1 ...


1

'Meter' is the time-signature. Maybe constant, maybe different every bar. 'Rhythm' is the notes. Maybe there will be repeated patterns, maybe not. It's still rhythm. 'Meter' is the framework we hang rhythm on to. I'm impressed by how complicated an explanation of this can be made!


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