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12

I believe there are fundamentally 2 main reasons I can think of: historically, the tempo was not strict as it has been considered in the last 2-3 centuries, and it was usually decided based on the time signature; so, for instance, 3/8 was considerably faster than 3/4, and that's usually true even for today's music: if the fraction has a larger denominator, ...


11

I would argue that it's a question of levels. In other words, the confusion is caused due to the different hierarchical levels of the meter (the eighth-note level and the measure level). You're correct that the 2+2+3 pattern, when we focus on that eighth-note level of a 7/8 measure, doesn't necessarily suggest any "normal accents [that] reoccur ...


10

What you're hearing I would consider as added beats rather than missing ones. The general term for how beats are grouped is meter. Meter is the pattern of strong and weak pulses that underlie the music -- the places where you might clap along. All genres of Western music tend to have a regular meter throughout the piece; however, in more contemporary music (&...


8

Three against two is really easy for any experienced musician. If you were going to write seven against five, most people would have trouble playing it accurately.


8

I've found this pdf with an analog notation 3/2 like yours with 6 beamed white notes. They say that these notes have the double value (quarter notes, not eighth) and they must be played almost legato: The example on the far right is notated with white notes. It says “On la note aussi de cette façon6 ". In fact, Couperin notices three of the four ...


8

In Couperin's time, a dot after a note-head didn't always mean to extend the duration by exactly 50%. Here, each dot means to extend the duration by just the right amount so as to make the durations in the top line match the bass.


7

The 8 in 6/8 is not a beat. The groupings of three are the beats. I learned recently that time signatures can be fractional in the top number. For example, 2.5/4 meter. "Can" in this context just means "a moderately well-informed musician is likely to know what it means", it's not standard. Traditionally, this "two beats then a ...


5

Because there are three primary beats in each bar, it would be considered triple meter and very possibly would be written as an additive meter (5+5+5/8) to avoid ambiguity. "Odd meter" would still apply at the subdivision level, because groups of 5 are interpreted as 3+2 or 2+3.


4

Perhaps the most fruitful path of inquiry would pertain to what we call hypermeter, which is a pattern of strong/weak metrical pulses that occurs above the level of the notated meter. For instance, an entire measure is "beat one," the next measure is "beat two," etc. Bill Rothstein discusses this extensively in his Phrase Rhythm in Tonal ...


4

One name for this is white notation, although that term is typically associated with mensural notation. To distinguish this from that, one may call it French baroque white notation. See for example http://www.sibelius.com/cgi-bin/helpcenter/chat/chat.pl?com=thread&start=692692&groupid=3&&guest=1: No, this will be French Baroque "white ...


4

I have no disagreements with Aaron, Perricone, or you. As you pointed out, however, Perricone didn't explain what he meant by 'summative'. Your 'math' seems correct. I'll offer another way to look at it, mathematically. (This is not any standard methodology; just my interpretation of Perricone's work.) / (strong stress) can be thought of as 'play this ...


4

I haven't read the work of the theorist in question, but the description of "measured rhythm" in the Wikipedia article reminds me of something entirely different, which leads me to the conclusion that because 7/8 is a meter, it is necessarily metrical. The "something entirely different" is the opening of Time Piece, composed by Paul ...


4

Hemiola turns out to be fairly strictly defined (see Sources and Definitions, below). The key distinction from other 3:2 relationships is that it is a metrical event, as opposed to a rhythmic one. That is, hemiola temporarily redefines the meter of a piece by affecting the beat level or without changing the primary subdivision pulse. Thus, the following ...


4

The other important information that the "denominator" of a time signature conveys is the beat in relation to other sections of the music. The meter of a piece does not have to remain constant, and as an example, it is possible to go from 4/4 to 3/8. In that case, the new time signature uses the eighth note as its beat for a triple meter, and the ...


4

After all, if it's only going to make a small difference in how I read and no difference in how I play the song or count, then what's the point of the bottom number? The point is, you have to write SOMETHING there, or otherwise the top number doesn't mean ANYTHING. It's about culture, conventions, tradition and language. Not natural science, laboratory ...


3

Needs a little bit of looking at, more for which notes are played than where they all fit between each other, but any player from grade VI upwards would manage that, and pros wouldn't even get a small weapon out.


3

In general, I think it's just called "skipping a beat". Here I think you have a slightly different case of "adding a beat". The way I hear it, the song is mostly 4/4 with a few interjected 5/4 measures, or you could consider it to be interjections of a 1/4 measure (whenever he sings "Modern"). David Bennett has a few videos that ...


3

It’s 6/8 or less likely 6/4 for a pop song. There actually are accents on 1 and 4. The accent on 1 is implied in some measures. An accent is not necessarily simply a louder note. In this excerpt, the chord changes happen on beat one. The listener senses that right away and begins to hear that as the most important beat. The accent on beat 4 is the highest ...


3

How would you describe the difference between "Rhythmic Stress" and "Metric Stress"? As you say, metric stress is the basic beat pattern for the given time signature. It's not strictly accurate to link this to the quarter-note, though. For example, in 3/16 time, the metric stress of strong-weak-weak goes with the sixteenth note. What sort ...


3

The simplest solution given by the Wikipedia Irrational Meters entry. You would just write it as two half-notes, which, given the 2/3 time signature, would be understood as two thirds-of-a-whole-note. for example, one beat in ​4⁄5 is written as a normal quarter note, four quarter notes complete the bar, but the whole bar lasts only ​4⁄5 of a reference whole ...


3

Yes, beats in fractional meters can be grouped in integers, but in integers based on subdivisions of the beat. For example, a bar of (2.5)/4 could be treated as a bar of 5/8, then grouped as 2+3 or 3+2 according to an eighth-note pulse. In the below excerpt from Percy Grainger's "Lord Melbourne (War Song)" (Lincolnshire Posy, fifth movement), I ...


3

Agreed with the other answers. I'd just opine that since how beats are grouped depends on the particular music involved, and that any note value or combination of note values can be considered the beat, and since any fractional meter is simply the equivalent of some integral meter (if we exclude irrational fractional meters, which are silly anyway), then ...


3

I read Wikipedia's definition this way: Additive rhythm is "metrical", because the same accent pattern occurs in each measure. So 7/8 considered as (3+3+2)/8 would be "metrical"; whereas a 7/8 with different stresses in different measures would be "measured". X: 1 T: Metrical 7/8 = (2+2+3) M: 7/8 K: C major L: 1/8 !>!BB !>!...


3

When counting with the system you're using, the beat is always the whole number. X/2 time: minim = 1 2 3 ...; crotchet = 1 & 2 & ...; quaver = 1 e & a 2 e & a .... X/4 time: crotchet = 1 2 3 ...; quavers = 1 & 2 & ...; semiquavers = 1 e & a 2 e & a .... X/8 time: quaver = 1 2 3 ...; semiquaver = 1 & 2 & ...; ...


2

Charles Rosen's "The Romantic Generation" has two or three chapters on Chopin. He does discuss Chopin's style in detail.


2

I think you will find lots of information by reading about poetry and meter. Scansion is the "scanning" of a line of text to determine its meter. That is probably an important thing for you to look into. The basic idea is poetry (lyrics) can be written to fit into regular metrical patterns like iambic which is short/long or weak/strong. There are ...


2

An old question, but the existing answer don't seem to get directly to the point. The matter is entirely about how the beat is subdivided. Simple meters subdivide beats by two. Compound meters divide beats by three. When the top number is multiple of 3 (greater than 3 itself) so 6, 9, 12, etc. then the meter is compound not simple. Divide that top number ...


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