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26

Brubeck's exploration of 5-beat and other asymmetrical meters was revolutionary for jazz, but it had been going on for decades in classical music, largely inspired in the late 19th century by the identification of such meters in folk music. Prominent along these composers were several Russians. Wikipedia attributes Brubeck's interest to his studies with ...


18

They are not very much alike, and cannot often (if ever!) be used interchangeably. So, the question itself is under false premises. 3/4 is 3 beats of one crotchet each. Counted 1&2&3& 1&2&3& etc. 6/8 is 6 beats of one quaver each. Counted as 123456 123456 etc. 3/4 therefore is simple - it could be 1 2 3 1 2 3. 6/8 is compound, as ...


16

This very much depends on what tradition you're working in, what information you're trying to convey, and who will be reading it. As many other answers have noted, the "feel" of the two meters is often thought to be different. This is because 6/8, in traditions that rely on sheet music written in the western style, is nearly universally interpreted as two ...


14

There are examples of Five-Step Waltzes danced to 5/4 time from the 19th century from about 1846. These are also known as "Valse à Cinq Temps". There are descriptions of some of theses at the Library of Dance. It's quite possible that Huxley might have heard of these.


11

Add to the list of well known 5/4 music Mussorgsky's Promenade from Pictures at an Exhibition. But really I think you need to also consider authentic folk music which can use odd meters or mixed meters. ...The saxophones wailed like melodious cats under the moon Early Duke Ellington would have the saxophones, so this description isn't out of the blue. But, ...


9

1914-1916 was when Holst was writing his Planet Suite. That included Mars, in 5/4 time. So Huxley would maybe have heard that. He was writing about slightly improbable, unusual happenings, so a 5/4 dance would slot right in. In fact, it would be shorter to list periods and composers that didn't use 5/4, dating from ancient Greeks to modern times. It's just ...


8

Tchaikovsky's Sixth Symphony's second movement is in 5/4 time. It has been called a "limping waltz." There are others (folk songs from everywhere), ancient Greek music, several mass movements, some others. It's not unusual. I don't know how one might dance a 5/4 but perhaps rock-rock-1-2-3 (a traditional rock step pair followed by the waltz 1-2-3). This ...


6

Does it need classification? Why does everything have to be pigeon-holed? 5/4 (and 5/8 for that matter) is generally split into a more manageable 2 and 3, or 3 and 2. Not very often is it counted as a simple 5 with no sub pulse. That may be because humans are happier with basic counts of 2s and 3s. After all, most of our (Western) music falls into that ...


5

Perrot and Cellarius' Valse à Cinq Temps (1846) is a five-step waltz composed by balletmaster Jules Perrot for the ballet Catarina in 1846 and published by Henri Cellarius in 1847. At the time that Aldous wrote there were theatrical interpretations of 5 step in swing and brass that were being written about by press critics. ...


5

I should just rename myself "Mr.Dolmetsch Quoter" in music, there are three kinds of meter: simple in simple meter, each beat is normally subdivided into two parts, and the note receiving the beat is always a standard note value (i.e. a crotchet (quarter note), etc.) compound in compound meter, each beat is normally subdivided into ...


4

It's a convention that 6/8 is different from 3/4. Historically, time signatures represented tempo as well as note arrangement. A 3/4 time signature represents 3 beats in a measure using a quarter-note as a single beat. A 6/8 time signature represents 2 beats in a measure divided into triplets (else one could use 2/4). To hear the difference, try a waltz (...


4

Almost all uses of the time signatures 3/8, 6/8, 9/8, etc. are due to a flaw in the notation for time signatures: there is no way to indicate that a dotted note has the beat. If 3/4 were written 3/♩ then 6/8 would be written 2/♩. and they could both be interpreted in the same way: 3/♩ would mean that the measure is divided into 3 beats and each of those ...


4

If you study the timings of human players, you will notice that they almost never play mechanically exactly what the theoretical written values would be. Timings, pitches, dynamics, everything. Musical notation is a means of written communication about musical ideas from humans to humans. It's meant to be subjectively interpreted by a performer. Exact ...


3

Holst's Mars brought War in 5/4 time in the 1910s, pre-dating Brave New World by almost two decades. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_New_World


3

There are a few things going on here. First is hypermeter: composers very frequently organize bars into two-bar groups and those two-bar groupings into four-bar groupings, and sometimes four-bar groupings into 8-bar or even 16-bar groupings. Now, you often don't tap your foot at those long intervals, but if you tried conducting them with a sort of "strong-...


3

Classical forms were followed very closely for quite a while. They thought that if your form was 32 bars and you had an anacrusis, then you should omit the length of the anacrusis from the final measure, or else it wouldn't be a proper 32 bars. You'll find that just about any piece in that time period with a standard form and an anacrusis will drop the ...


3

If you really want to go full math-rock, you could always put notes on the beats given by floor( sqrt(2) * n), for n = 1, 2, 3, ... This will generate notes on beats 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, ... X: 1 K: Cmaj M: L: 1/4 A A z A A z A A A z A A z A A A z A A z A Mathematically, it can be proven that this pattern will never ...


2

There is no short list of most popular meters, but what there is is all the existing music and lyrics in the genre that you want to write for. If you’re not already someone who sings, learn to sing. Pay attention to the meter and prosody of the songs that you love. You will probably find that meter is not actually consistent through the verses of many songs....


2

There is way too much missing to provide a complete answer but I will try and add some guidance from experience. You state that you want random groups of notes to be "meaningful" but can you define a criterion for meaningful (or is that what you want from us). What makes music meaningful in many cultures is rhythm not melody (though both are important). ...


2

Right! If you're on the nursery slopes, treat anything as 'it will be simple, so don't overthink it'. Firstly, listen to more music, with a slightly critical ear. Feel the pulse, count 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4 along with it. Get the rhythm of anything you're listening to, get it moving you - your head nodding, your foot tapping, your hands clapping. All the more ...


2

To me, the context-agnostic definition of syncopation has always been "something unexpected". Usually applied to rhythm, but it has been used in many other music dynamics too. In that sense, the answer depends on both the particularities of the genre-style, and the song itself. In other words, it depends on the expectations that have been established; ...


1

...I never understand what it means that the ____ gets the beat... as if that note gets the beat what do the other notes get? The beat unit gets the beat. So in common time - 4/4 - quarter note gets the beat and there are 4 beats per bar. I think you understand that. The note values smaller than the beat unit are called subdivisions of the beat. In terms ...


1

You need some one-to-one sessions with a teacher. Probably have to be online at present, but Lord knows, there's enough unoccupied musicians available!


1

Dance-form movements which started with an anacrusis were generally notated with an incomplete final bar, if only to facilitate repeat barlines. Because we encounter a lot of this sort of music in our early musical training - the early piano grade exams are full of Bach, Mozart etc. dance movements - we maybe give this convention too much importance. Use ...


1

You can compare the meter in the Beethoven Scherzo with compound meters like 6/4 and 6/8 which have two beats when the tempo is fast and six beats when the tempo is slow. In a similar way Beethoven's Scherzo in 3/4 has one beat instead of three each bar because of the fast tempo. The conductor will only conduct one beat per bar. The Trio is actually ...


1

It seems imperfect bar could be applied to both the inital and final bars involved in an anacrusis. I don't know if that is an outdated term, the Google book is an old, public domain copy of Grove's Dictionary. https://books.google.com/books?id=vOQ-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA131


1

I consider common practice period as a term related to tonality, while your question is more related to rhyth and emphasis. The answer may depend on period, style and ethnic origin of the music. If a piece (or a part of it, bracketed by repeat marks) stats with an anacrusis or upbeat (terms confirmed by Wikipedia), there is a very strong tendency for the ...


1

As noted in a Lars Peter Schultz comment, there are "Ritmo di quattro battute" and "Ritmo di tre battute" indications in the score of the scherzo of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, so yes, Beethoven did intend for the measure to be the beat. "Ritmo di quattro battute" signifies that the measures are grouped in 4-measure phrases, while "Ritmo di tre battute" ...


1

Regardless of how the notes in 5/4 are grouped, I believe 5/4 is a simple meter because its quarter notes are divided into 8th-note duplets. A quintuple-meter respective compound meter is 15/8, with 5 dotted-quarter-note beats made of 8th-note triplets.


1

Benrg's answer is really the correct one here, but I'd like to add a little historical perspective on why this convention exists. 3/4 meter generally represents 3 beats to a measure, where a quarter note is the primary beat. 6/8 generally represents 2 beats to a measure, where a dotted quarter is the primary beat. To understand why this happened, it's ...


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