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20

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


16

The usual strum pattern for this is downstrums are on the beat. Thus your hand goes in a downwards position on 1, 2, 3 and 4. This also means that the upstrums will come on the & so will occur on 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. Since you're not strumming 8 times in the bar, play the strings on 1 2 & (3) & 4. Obviously that means a ghost strum, ...


13

My experience is strictly from playing the piano, but despite the difference in the specific motion required, the approach to building speed is the same. The short answer to your question is, "Don't do it". It's tempting to use the metronome to push yourself faster, but this strategy doesn't work largely for the same reason that this strategy doesn't work ...


11

I think I can understand what your teacher was trying to say. He wanted to make you feel the music. Music needs to breathe. If a computer and a human play the same song, it will sound different; the human version will be more natural; the computer version will be more mathematically correct. Your teacher might be worried that if you kept practicing with a ...


9

If you can't hear the click because it falls right underneath your strokes, that's called "burying the click", and it's generally a good thing. If your stroke is consistently just before the click, that's referred to as playing "ahead of the beat"; If your stroke is just after the click, it's called playing "behind the beat". Both are valid techniques to ...


9

When you first start to record yourself against a strict tempo, that's when you discover the unforgiving world of click tracks.... it's a pain we all have to go through. Things to make life easier... Use some kind of 'drum machine' - anything that can give some 'feel' to the track you are about to lay down, even if it sounds nothing like a drummer, that ...


8

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


8

It depends on what you're trying to accomplish. If I'm trying to work on accuracy in sixteenth notes, I set the metronome to a sixteenth note (or eighth notes). If I'm trying to work on the bigger flow of the piece, I set it to quarter notes. Sometimes I turn the metronome off (or to a very slow setting) and work on the "big" beat (i.e. each measure). ...


8

In general, setting the metronome to sixteenth notes for a typical piece will only be useful when you are trying to figure out an intricate rhythm in ultra-slow motion. Once you move from the "figure-out" to the "actually practise in style" phase, you'll very likely want to use the "denominator of the time signature", like 4 in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 beats or 2 in 2/...


7

While it is possible that your metronome banning teacher was just a bad teacher (Such a thing is clearly possible), because as a rule metronomes are good, I often save metronome work for intermediate and advanced students. This is primarily because in the beginning it can be frustrating to achieve music on an instrument. Metronome work can compound that ...


6

You can use a metronome in different ways to study complex rhythmic figures. You can set the beat to correspond to a quarter note and work on subdividing the beats evenly. Or you can double the tempo so it corresponds to eighth notes and subdivide the sixteenths. Or you can double that so it corresponds to sixteenth notes, and work on counting beats for the ...


6

Playing with a metronome can be a challenge but can help tremendously with achieving proper timing when playing a musical piece as well as refining your ability to maintain the overall tempo throughout the song. I find that the digital metronomes that allow you to choose from a large number of different beats where you can have the accent beat where it ...


5

this is a really nice one, I would proceed as follows: would you mind adding the title and maybe the Op.Nr?


5

It's so awkward to describe this stuff with words. Here's how this pattern, as it's usually played, should be written: X:1 L:1/8 M:C K:C %%score T1 T2 A B V:T1 clef=treble-8 % 1 [V:T1] vB2 vB(uB B)uB vB2 The difference between what OP describes and what is generally meant by this pattern is that in the pattern, the second "up" is on the 2nd part ...


4

There is another excellent use of the metronome in learning technically challenging passages that I can recommend. To wit: Play the passage at whatever speed, however slow, that you are absolutely sure you can play it correctly. Raise the metronome one tick and play it again. If you play it correctly, raise it again. If you don't, take it back down one. ...


4

I would say that metronome work is most useful at the "middle" stage of learning a piece. You will probably want to start learning a difficult piece without the metronome, not worrying about being out of rhythm too much. Once you know the notes, try working up slowly with the metronome. Some pieces (or parts of pieces), especially those of the Romantic ...


4

Both have their uses. As stated in just about every answer so far, a drum machine is far less boring, and gets you ready for playing in a band with a real live drummer. However, it's a poor relation when it comes to using a metronome for its intended use - keeping time. I'll expand. Most will use a metronome to click on all of the beats in a bar - let's say ...


4

I managed to figure it out while asking the question. The reason is that 8 beats happens more and more quickly. At 100 bpm, 8 beats takes 4800 milliseconds, yet at 150bpm, it only takes 3200ms. I came up with a schedule of how to program a beat-only metronome so the increases are as close to 1 bpm every 4800ms as possible: At 100bpm, increase 1 bpm every 8 ...


4

It sounds as if you need to learn a little more theory -- a musical phrase can have a mixture of note lengths, and an unchanging tempo. A metronome provides you with a regular pulse. You are not necessarily expected to play a note on each tick, and often you'll also want to play notes in-between ticks. As a simple example, if you set the metronome to tick ...


4

A metronome can do several things. If a piece has a metronome marking, it can give you some idea of a composer's (or often an editor's) idea of how fast it should go. Also, it can give you an idea of whether your tempos through a piece are consistent. Especially when you are beginning to work on a piece, you can find that you are playing easier sections ...


4

It helps if you just listen to the metronome, tapping along with your foot and saying some four-syllable word on each beat (e.g. "caterpillar"). Each syllable then represents one 16th note, so you get a feeling for how 16th notes sound at the given tempo. As soon as you can hear the 16th notes in your head, you should also be able to play them. I would ...


4

Play an easier piece. Think of playing with a metronome as a skill to be learned. You'll be frustrated if you try to use a metronome and learn something else at the same time, so start with music that's so simple that it requires almost no conscious attention to play. If you have a lesson book, try the metronome with one of the early lessons. Playing the ...


4

Wow, that's a good one! Triplets on triplets! It's sort of compound compound time. 6/8 is 1 2 3 4 5 6, taking three counts from each of the two main emphasised beats in each bar. So 1** 2** becomes 1 2 3 4 5 6. but this subdivides again, with some of the counts becoming triplets for themselves. What I'd do is re-divide each bar into a sort of 12/8 feel. so ...


4

x bpm = x beats per minute = x/60 beats per second So the time between two beats (period in seconds) is: p = 60/x You see that at 60 bpm:p = 60/60 = 1 second. At 120bpm, p = 60/120 = 0.5 second. I also started programming a metronome (in GTK+ on Linux, but should work on Windows too if you install GTK+ separately), and things can get tricky in the timing....


4

Sweep picking is an interesting one to practice. Everyone has a sweet spot with sweep picking when they are starting, where the metronome is slow enough that they can hit each note properly but fast enough that their picking hand is moving smoothly in a controlled motion. Find this sweet spot (for me, it was eighth notes around 110BPM when I started) and ...


3

Two additional points beyond BobRodes's answer For using the metronome as a gauge for progress with specific agility/speed exercises: e.g. taking a given exercise and increasing the metronome rate each day for a period of time. Focusing on listening to the click is a basic step towards being able to listen to other performers when in an ensemble situation.


3

I have adopted Babu's suggestions. And I now make use of the metronome for two things: Checking that my playing has an even time. Discovering the tempo I'm playing at. Mostly, I'm just trying to make sure that I'm following (or working towards following) the tempo indication on the sheet music. The best increases in speed that I've made have been by ...


3

From the manual it seems like you need to be recording in order to use the metronome. You could try this part, but it's step 4 of the recording process: Press the [PAGE ►], [3], or [4] button to navigate to Pages 3 and 4 of the Record screen, and then turn Knobs 1 to 3 to set the tempo, time signature, and metronome for recording. If that doesn't work ...


3

I cannot speak specifically to percussion, but when I have worked with both wind players and pianists, when the student "loses" the metronome click, that is typically a bad thing. This is because they are so caught up in what they are playing that they are not concentrating on their time, and they are actually ignoring the metronome so much that they do not ...


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