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Good question! None of the bands I've worked with had drummers that used metronomes while playing live - but most are good timekeepers anyway.Except one where we used backing tracks, but he was at the back and had an uncanny sense of timing, so didn't need more than the count-in. If a recording is going on, then usually the drummer will use one. It's the ...


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IMHO i think both will be helpful to learn sense of rhythm. But there are differences of course. Good thing about metronome is you can change it, double or half the speed of it. So you have more options there. Also it's easier to hear you playing , if you don't have the whole recording sounding in the background. And you can hear a metronome with ...


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One obvious potential problem is tapping the beat with your foot interfering with various pedaling needs.


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Riding on and syncing to a pulse and rhythmic feel or ”groove” produced by others is of course an important skill. But you can’t rely on that only, you have to be able to produce the pulse and provide it to others reliably. Playing to records only is not a good practicing method, because you may develop habits of listening to specific subtle sound cues, and ...


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Since you only ask about metronome or recordings - they both have their place, along with other options... A metronome is useful, if not (very) boring. It can easily be changed tempo-wise, half, double, and everything in between. Also extremely useful to use in more advanced ways - set up and take each click as the & between the beats, for example. It ...


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Yes, definitely. There might be a "click track" or some sequenced backing that the live drummer plays along with. Just about every pro drummer in the pop world does this at some point. (If you look online for an old edition of BBC "RockSchool" with Omar Hakim, he did a very impressive demonstration of changing the feel by playing slightly ahead of or behind ...


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Mechanical metronomes tend to slow down as the spring runs down and the amplitude of the pendulum swing reduces. This is likely to be more significant at a slow tempo simply because the pendulum is getting fewer "pushes" per minute to keep it going. The clockwork mechanism is usually quite simple and easy to clean, but if you are tempted to try oiling it, ...


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I've watched people who tap their foot while playing; I've stood next to people in choirs who do it. I don't remember one person who did not experience problems keeping time that way. It's an extra movement to co-ordinate, and co-ordination can suffer. When these people reached a more complicated section, their foot-tapping slowed down to accommodate it. ...


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Attach the clip to the head of the guitar, play each string and the tuner will tell what note it's sounding. Fat to thin, aim for E A D G B and E, but be careful you're in the right octave for each string. The 'C' option may make the difference, as it's not transpositional, so switch to that over the others.


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I think but am not certain that some metronomes, or metronome apps for phones/tablets, can be set to have multiple pattern sounds, such as heavy down beat, light beats 2,3,4 (in 4/4 time), and different sound for beat divisions. If you can find one of those, just "reassign" the heavy down beat to your measure bar, set the "light beats" to the downbeat in ...


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I don't know of any such thing, but you could program a simple drum pattern to change the sound every so often. You could do this with the free version of just about any DAW or "drum machine" software.


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I had a similar confusion when experimenting in Reason today. Thus I did some research on what is defined as a beat in respect to BPM. Turns out, just stating a BPM value is ambiguous and should include a definition of what note value the BPM refers to as well. In sheet music you would see that as e.g. half note = 100 like in the example @Raven Cheuk posted. ...


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A big thing with drummers now is the distinction between micro-time and macro-time. When practicing, you can set your metronome to work on one aspect or the other. (I've never heard anyone but drummers talk about this, using this specific terminology, but I imagine this concept would be useful for all musicians regardless of their instrument.) Setting the ...


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