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Musical pulse is a fundamentally physical experience. So, incorporate as much of your body as possible -- even putting down your instrument if it helps you move more. Tap your feet, stomp your feet, march, walk, sway, drum on a table, clap, swing your arms, bob your head, dance, vocalize -- all along to the metronome (or drum machine, or music, or whatever). ...


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You're not a bad musician, you're a visual musician. According to Neuro-linguistic Programming, there are three kinds of people: auditive, visual and kinesthetic (representational systems). This means every person has their main sense focused on sounds, images or physical sensations (touch, smell, pressure etc). If you work with your eyes, go for it. Also, ...


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A lot of useful tips here, like putting the metronome behind you or tapping your foot, but I’d like to add a practice tip that might cost you no time at all, depending on your lifestyle and whether you’re in 2020 lockdown :( Whenever you’re listening to music, say you’re waiting, traveling, eating, walking, driving (I don’t know your age) or whatever, tap ...


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Depending on what instrument you play, here's another tip: First, without your instrument, make sure you are able to tap along with the metronome with your foot. Then, whenever you play, you always keep said foot tapping (whether you are using the metronome or not, or playing with a drummer/band/orchestra, just always). Now, at the very beginning (but only ...


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Some great answers here. One other suggestion I haven’t seen mentioned is rather than counting numbers to stay in time, with or without a metronome, recite a rhythmic phrase instead. It can just be gibberish, or maybe something lyrical, but either way it should help you feel and internalize the timing better than mechanically saying/thinking “1 and 2 and 3 ...


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If you are able to walk and co-ordinated enough to walk steadily, then you already have an internal metronome. I suggest you start simply by playing a song or a beat through headphones while you go for a walk. If you can keep in step, then you know you have the ability to keep time. Warning: Because you will be concentrating, walk where there is no danger of ...


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I use a metronome to set the really slow pace when I'm working through a new exercise and I need to regulate the evenness of my finger movements until I begin to acquire the flow of the exercise. I utilize both the sound and the visual by placing the metronome just to the side of the sheet music where I can see it in the corner of my eye and still read the ...


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Set a moderate tempo. Playing very fast ...and very slow tempos is hard. Set the metronome behind you or behind something so you don't see it. I find it extremely hard to play in time with or without a metronome The issue doesn't really seem to be about looking at the metronome, but about counting and rhythm. Count the beats out loud while playing. This ...


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A lot of folk find playing along to a metronome isn't easy. Especially one that just ticks. If it pings as well, it's easier to keep in time with. I find a drum track - on a drum machine or off the computer - is a much better bet. But maybe that's because I play with drummers (and play drums!). That will give a more live feel to any rhythm, as well as give a ...


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Ideally you want to feel the beat rather than see it, so yeah watching it is not a great habit. Some people would say the goal is to INTERNALISE the beat. How long have you been practicing with a metronome? If it's less than 10,000 hours what you need to do is practice more ;) Place the metronome behind you, practice, practice, practice, and remember that it'...


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