32

Well, every mic you toss into the mix also adds more ambience, a bit of feedback from PA and monitors, and will pick up sounds that aren't really supposed to be heard at all, like breathing. Now, this isn't necessarily bad – in particular in the studio, I rather like the compact room sensation caused by many mics picking up bleed from different sources. ...


23

As others have noted, the properties of the signal from the microphone and from the piezo pickup will be different. The microphone picks up the same kind of air vibrations your ear does. The piezo pickup picks up the vibration of the saddle. The pickup has the advantage of being less susceptible to (but not immune to) feedback, and it moves with the guitar. ...


21

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


19

In these pictures it's likely that one mic is for the PA and the other mic is for recording. Either they didn't have mic splitters or they didn't trust them! This was a very common way of doing things in the 70s. The Grateful Dead are known to use two mics as a noise cancelling technique. The output of the two mics is combined with equal levels but opposite ...


16

It's not a microphone; it's directional antenna for wireless microphone systems. See http://www.shure.com/americas/products/accessories/wireless-systems/wireless-systems-antennas for details.


14

There are two (popular) types of microphones: dynamic microphones and electret/condensor mics. Dynamic microphones They work like a speaker in reverse. Sound moves a diaphragm/coil assembly. The coil moves over a magnet and a current gets induces. Hence we have voltage. Almost indestructible. YOu can literally pound nails with a Sure SM58 (fun abuse video ...


13

Never understood why any mic needs to be live when not in use. Every mic I use on a gig will be equipped with an on/off switch, and it's expected to be used. My own vox mic is only ever on when I sing. (I don't want the audience hearing my asides!) As a former soundman, I would always pull a mic down if it wasn't being used - it saves any possibility of ...


11

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


10

The sound from a microphone inside the guitar (or piezo pickups as in the case with Clapton) is different from the sound outside of the guitar. The signal from internal microphones or pickups will be more consistent, since it is not affected by movements of the guitar. Likely the signals are mixed to get the best of both worlds.


10

I think your question is sort of backwards. The cheapest condenser mics are very inexpensive. Electret condenser designs are used for small and cheap headset mics, phone mics, and PC/laptop mics. I think what you really want to ask is why the most expensive dynamic mics are still less than $1000 (excluding ribbon mics), while so many condenser designs are ...


9

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


9

XLR is designed to carry a "balanced" signal. Pin 1 is ground, Pin 2 is "in phase" or "+" and Pin 3 is "out of phase" or "-". See for example http://www.clarkwire.com/pinoutxlrbalanced.htm The reason is the following: The microphone signals are very low so they are vulnerable to noise that gets injected into the cable especially if the run is long. Noise ...


8

Guitar-and-vocal studio and live micing has been studied heavily, yet while there are a lot of recommendations, perhaps the foremost among them is "experiment". Now, that advice is generally aimed at the professional recording engineer or home studio enthusiast, with a locker full of microphones to choose from. Someone looking to buy their first mike, like ...


7

Adding to Meaningful Username's answer, the different sources (piezo pickup vs microphone) emphasise different parts of the guitar's sound. Not only is it used to help the sound be more consistent etc. but the different sounds themselves make for much more versatility when mixing. In general (this can vary wildly) a microphone will give a more "natural" ...


7

The short answer is no, and don't do that. :-) Your mixer contains a very important component, which is the mic preamp. The compressor wants to use line-level signal as input and output. Even if you injected phantom power between the compressor and the mic, then you're still trying to make the compressor work with mic-level signal. Nothing should come ...


7

The proximity of a mic to a singer will have a profound difference in the sound captured. Good vocalists use this phenomenon a lot - you'll see someone holding a mic at various distances from the mouth - to vary volume and to an extent tone. Add that to the almost infinite variation of tone and volume naturally, and there's a heck of a range. On a personal ...


7

Simple answer: because microphones are analog and USB is digital. The only way you can make a "USB microphone" is to build an analog-to-digital converter into it. Of course you can buy the electronic components to do that with garbage sound quality for a few dollars, and for some applications (e.g. headsets with microphones) that is fine, because audio ...


7

A USB microphone is essentially a microphone, preamp, and audio interface in one. They're convenient when you're recording or streaming with a single microphone that can be placed within a short distance of the computer (the specification for USB has a maximum cable length of 5 meters). But they become almost unusable outside of that situation. A live sound ...


6

Should I buy an audio interface to support my AT2020USB mic? Is it necessary to buy it... If you keep the existing microphone, than no. The primary purpose of an audio interface is to convert an analog signal into a digital one. Because your microphone is a USB mic (and USB cables carry a digital signal) there is already an analog-to-digital converter ...


6

3.5mm mic jacks might (sometimes supported by a jumper or different sound card setting) provide "plugin power". It can power electret condenser capsules with the typical single-FET preamplifier and works, for example, for the surprisingly good stereo clip microphones that were available for Minidisc players. Regular phantom power, however, is 40V to 48V ...


6

In principle, I agree with him. If you don't need a channel, mute it. In practise though, I would disagree here. It sounds very much like he's heard that principle but hasn't yet got the experience to know when to ignore it. This sounds like one of those instances. When you don't have a soundman out front and one of the players has to set up the mix, ...


5

High budget solution The only very effective way to amplify an accordion is with multiple microphones attached to the accordion itself. On this picture you can see three, but I've usually seen people using four microphones (two on each side): Remember that the sound of an accordion does not come from one central spot; each note comes from a different place ...


5

Are the mikes on the amps feeding a PA which feeds the audience ears, or are the amps making the sound for the audience themselves ? If they're going through a PA one way is to turn the volume of the amps down a bit (so they don't saturate the room & bleed onto each other), face them away from each other or use acoustic shields to isolate them (or just ...


5

The problem you are looking at is that the 1/4" jack input is set for Line Level, and the Mic is producing the lower Mic level. The Impedance transformer is merely adjusting the impedance levels to match, not boosting the mic signal. To have the same volume control when putting the mic through the line level input, you will have to pre-amp the mic signal ...


5

Electronic drums really don't need any mics. Because they are electronic, you can record straight from the audio output (headphone jack if there are no other outputs). If you have it connected to an amplifier, you can record it the same way you would record an amplifier, by either micing up the speaker or by taking any line level output to record. If you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible