8

Audio cables - don't believe the hype! I'd say the difference between a $2 cable & a $25 cable would be completely & utterly undetectable. Your laptop's DACs will lose more than the cable ever will, in terms of 'pure quality'.


5

The -10dB shown in the second image of the polar pattern is a rather generous 'average' of some sort. This pattern is typical for a super-cardioid mic & it will display similar characteristics at all frequencies, but in the absence of specific frequency maps in the second image, you must assume they're using averaging - in this case to make the product ...


4

The sweet spot or pickup pattern of the mic doesn’t change, but different vocalists have different projection patterns, so you might want to line the sweet spot of the mic up with a different part of the singers body. Lower placement makes the mic more chesty, higher sounds more nasal. Distance also makes a difference. Farther away has less bass and less ...


4

This is a common myth/misunderstanding… There is absolutely no issue whatsoever plugging a modern mic of any type [probably anything newer than 1970] into a circuit with phantom power, so long as the mic & XLR > XLR cables are correctly wired. Any mic which doesn't need phantom will essentially just 'ignore it'. Some high quality references covering ...


3

This would probably work with just a simple XLR → ¼"TS cable. An impedance transformer would give you higher signal level, but isn't really needed. Nevertheless, if you can afford it I would recommend you actually use a proper microphone preamp. Standalone preamps are sold mostly for studio applications; typically the main feature is that they use a ...


3

Ooh, this sounds like fun. The guitar pedal is expecting a hi-Z (high impedance) input, like what comes out of a guitar. So what you need is one of these: https://www.amazon.com/Hosa-MIT-176-XLR3F-Impedance-Transformer/dp/B000068O69/ Which is the same thing you'd use to plug a microphone directly into a guitar amp (something every band has done at least once)...


2

The Behringer has a TRS input on channel 1 (Balanced input). The wiring is in the manual, but is as follows; The same input on channel 1 can also be a mono input (unbalanced) Your Blink 500 does NOT have balanced output on the receiver; it has a 3.5mm stereo output. The best solution is to find a 3.5mm 1/8" TRS to Dual 6.35mm 1/4" TS Mono Stereo ...


2

If you want the real simple solution; record into your phone, but put the phone further away from yourself so it isn't biased on where it's pointing. More complex: Use the condenser mic you have, and hook it to your computer. Record the sound there. Also record the sound (and video) on your phone. Transfer that file to the computer. Use music software to ...


2

In my experience, consumer sound cards are generally quite useless for anything but line-level signals or the electret-condensers that are usually what you find in headsets. Dynamic mics have lower impedance but also lower signal level, and bringing up the recording gain means the low-quality mic preamps in the sound card bring up the noise so much that you ...


2

For one thing the mask will dampen the acoustic field considerably, it acts as a barrier (its primary job). So the effect would be similar to trying to sing or talk with your hand over your mouth, or through a closed window. The sound just won't be as strong. I would suspect that the effect would be frequency dependent meaning that different frequencies ...


2

I agree that a DI is your best bet. I'm assuming the wireless receiver plugs into power with a small external transformer ("wall wart"). If this is the case, then I suggest a passive, transformer-coupled DI like a Radial JDI or Whirlwind IMP-2. Those types of DIs have good common-mode rejection so if the noise is coming from nearby EMF that might ...


1

Almost all lav mics work the same way. They require what is known as pip for plug-in-power, that is a voltage feed of around 5V. The P4 does not have any input giving this kind of power. You can get an adapter for this, I use Rode VXLR+ myself (NOTE: the + in the name, the version without + does not output pip). You use that connector or similar on an XLR ...


1

Yes. It doesn't take much computer power by today's standards to record a few tracks of audio. And the Focusrite is a competent interface. You could probably get just as good a result with a mic half the price though. Above a certain price level mics might sound different, but not really 'better'. Have you got a really nice-sounding room to record in? ...


1

Try the simple adapter. When I started gigging, PA amps had Lo-Z and Hi-Z mic jacks. But inputs on today's gear are very forgiving, a high input impedance with plenty of gain is typical and accepts most sources. The only Hi-Z input you're likely to see will be for a VERY high impedance source like a guitar pickup. For the price of a simple adapter... ...


1

No. Your Xonar expects a different type of mic. I'm afraid that JTS mic looks absolutely horrible! The cheapest mic worth buying might be a USB mic for about twice that price. Some are designed to flatter a vocalist when used hand-held and close, others are more suitable for recording 'the whole room'.


1

Cables can effect sound, but the issue is length. Long cables can essentially be a low-pass filter, dropping the highs. I'm told the effect starts to be noticable at 25', but here, Dylan Talks Tone demonstrates the effect with a 500' cable. At 2 meters, just over 6 feet, it should be fine.


1

There is no reason for that not to work, the best is always to try ;). This microphone is fitted with 3.5mm Jack which you can normally fit straight in the microphone input of your computer. If your computer is fitted with a combined jack (4-rings, manage loudspeakers and a microphone through one jack) then you will need an adaptator. This mic seems to be ...


1

I have to pres the +48V power button on for the condenser mics, and the manual says never to give phantom power to a dynamic mic As elaborated by Tesujin, there is no reason for this concern. The only problem with phantom on a dynamic mic is that a live-disconnect (or cable fault) will create a very loud pop sound – but that's pretty much the case for ...


1

I had a similar problem, and realized that my connection to the recording device (my computer) was bad. I was using an amplifier/mixer connected directly to the PC's built-in audio interface (i.e. not using USB), and couldn't figure out where the noise was coming from. By using a real "pro-sumer" audio interface (with its own built-in phantom power ...


1

You need to read the manual for the wireless microphone to find out what the connections should be, in order to get the correct adaptor to suit the mixer. TRS simply describes a plug/socket with three terminals. Unfortunately, these plugs get used in several incompatible ways, including: Stereo audio: left/right/ground Balanced audio: positive/negative/...


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