7

A USB microphone is essentially a microphone, preamp, and audio interface in one. They're convenient when you're recording or streaming with a single microphone that can be placed within a short distance of the computer (the specification for USB has a maximum cable length of 5 meters). But they become almost unusable outside of that situation. A live sound ...


7

Simple answer: because microphones are analog and USB is digital. The only way you can make a "USB microphone" is to build an analog-to-digital converter into it. Of course you can buy the electronic components to do that with garbage sound quality for a few dollars, and for some applications (e.g. headsets with microphones) that is fine, because audio ...


4

The -10dB shown in the second image of the polar pattern is a rather generous 'average' of some sort. This pattern is typical for a super-cardioid mic & it will display similar characteristics at all frequencies, but in the absence of specific frequency maps in the second image, you must assume they're using averaging - in this case to make the product ...


3

This is common among inline preamps; if it consumes phantom 48V to power itself, it won't pass any of that power "upstream" to the mic or other equipment. You shouldn't need a new phantom power source between the preamp and audio interface as long as the interface is powering the preamp well enough. But you will either need a phantom power injector between ...


3

It won't blow it up, because the +48V is the same voltage source, via some resistors of typically a few kilohms. So all you are really doing is decreasing the value of the resistors. They aren't critical and the mic should work fine. But it's really not a good idea, because you are also shorting the inputs of the two mic amps together, and they just are not ...


2

A Y-splitter will work. Or it seems easy to post-process in GarageBand, as described here:


2

This is such an older outdated post.. So I thought I would update it.. You can in fact plug a USB condenser microphone into a mixer or an interface.. You need a standard USB brick charger (like you use for any cell phone or tablet) to power the USB microphone.. Then on the microphones headphone output you use a Mic out jack to Line In jack or Mic in jack on ...


2

The Behringer has a TRS input on channel 1 (Balanced input). The wiring is in the manual, but is as follows; The same input on channel 1 can also be a mono input (unbalanced) Your Blink 500 does NOT have balanced output on the receiver; it has a 3.5mm stereo output. The best solution is to find a 3.5mm 1/8" TRS to Dual 6.35mm 1/4" TS Mono Stereo ...


2

If you want the real simple solution; record into your phone, but put the phone further away from yourself so it isn't biased on where it's pointing. More complex: Use the condenser mic you have, and hook it to your computer. Record the sound there. Also record the sound (and video) on your phone. Transfer that file to the computer. Use music software to ...


1

The other answer is wrong - polyphonic MIDI generation from audio is actually very, very good these days, due to recent advancements in the field of machine learning. See this demo from the Magenta team to see what I'm talking about, and even this is simplistic compared to the best we have today - when there's no noise in the audio, I honestly have not ...


1

Polyphonic MIDI generation from audio, as far as I know, isn't yet at the stage that it could produce reliable, accurate output from anything but the simplest piano piece. You could get hold of an acoustic piano that has a MIDI output, such as a Yamaha Disklavier or MIDI grand. You could also look into Slient Piano systems, some of which I think have MIDI. ...


1

I had a similar problem, and realized that my connection to the recording device (my computer) was bad. I was using an amplifier/mixer connected directly to the PC's built-in audio interface (i.e. not using USB), and couldn't figure out where the noise was coming from. By using a real "pro-sumer" audio interface (with its own built-in phantom power ...


1

You need to read the manual for the wireless microphone to find out what the connections should be, in order to get the correct adaptor to suit the mixer. TRS simply describes a plug/socket with three terminals. Unfortunately, these plugs get used in several incompatible ways, including: Stereo audio: left/right/ground Balanced audio: positive/negative/...


1

No, for a few reasons. 1) USB isn't as transient and XLR isn't. What happens each time USB is upgraded?... buy new mics? The only major change to XLR was the introduction of 1986 phantom power in 1986 - gave mikes power without batteries ... the power supplied along cable.) 2) High-end mics are expensive, and sometimes older (pre-digital), better mics are ...


1

I think what would be a much better solution is a preamp with EQ designed for piezo pickups. The lack of low end is inherent in piezo pickups especially when they are not connected to a preamp with the right input impedance. I would look at pedals from Fishman and LR Baggs and any related brands to find a piezo preamp with EQ and ideally an XLR output. Then ...


1

There's plenty of condenser mics under $400. But you're half right - there does seem to be a ceiling on the price of dynamic mics whereas for condensers the sky's the limit! Leaving aside the special case of over-priced vintage Neumanns - it's hard to believe there's really a 'lost art' of microphone design that modern technology couldn't reproduce - ...


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