14

The simplest difference to grasp is 'intended use'. In one sentence, professional vs consumer. High impedance mics are cheap & cheerful, designed to plug straight into computer headset sockets. The computer's circuitry is equally cheap & cheerful. They go hand in hand. You can't plug a low impedance mic directly into a cheap computer headset/mic ...


3

All XLR. Mic to Hayden input. Hayden output to desk. Switch the phantom on before connecting anything. Of course, a bit late to mention it now, but you could have got the 802 with proper phantom for less than the 502 + Hayden + extra cable ;)


3

This would probably work with just a simple XLR → ¼"TS cable. An impedance transformer would give you higher signal level, but isn't really needed. Nevertheless, if you can afford it I would recommend you actually use a proper microphone preamp. Standalone preamps are sold mostly for studio applications; typically the main feature is that they use a ...


3

Ooh, this sounds like fun. The guitar pedal is expecting a hi-Z (high impedance) input, like what comes out of a guitar. So what you need is one of these: https://www.amazon.com/Hosa-MIT-176-XLR3F-Impedance-Transformer/dp/B000068O69/ Which is the same thing you'd use to plug a microphone directly into a guitar amp (something every band has done at least once)...


3

The mic should only be a TS - it's mono. Simplest would probably be to take all the barrels off & actually check everything is managing to physically connect to the right connections. A continuity meter could be useful if you have one. If they don't match, grab a soldering iron & start swapping plugs. Make sure you get an accurate pin-out diagram of ...


3

The microphones of most smart phones or portable PCs are able to reliably record frequencies between 100Hz and 10kHz. Although a piano can produce bass frequencies well below 100Hz, a useful tuning software does not need to consider them as it can derive enough information from the overtones with higher frequencies. So it depends on the piano tuning app you ...


2

I agree that a DI is your best bet. I'm assuming the wireless receiver plugs into power with a small external transformer ("wall wart"). If this is the case, then I suggest a passive, transformer-coupled DI like a Radial JDI or Whirlwind IMP-2. Those types of DIs have good common-mode rejection so if the noise is coming from nearby EMF that might ...


2

In my experience, consumer sound cards are generally quite useless for anything but line-level signals or the electret-condensers that are usually what you find in headsets. Dynamic mics have lower impedance but also lower signal level, and bringing up the recording gain means the low-quality mic preamps in the sound card bring up the noise so much that you ...


2

If the contour of the contoured washer (usually called a "saddle washer") mates snugly with the barrel of the microphone (as it seems to), I would assume they are meant to contact directly, without the O-ring. The most likely place then for the O-ring is between the saddle washer and stand where it will keep the mic from tilting, even without ...


2

I guess between 'contoured washer' and mic body. Shoud be a matching one the other side.


2

I'll try to present a personal armchair-psychological view on this, not talking about auditory systems, nerves, biological physics and other stuff of which I know practically nothing. But I know what it feels like to be me, so that should count for something. why are the flawed acoustics of a venue far less acceptable on a recording than in person This is ...


1

You say "each component works well individually". Let's assume that your 3.5mm TRS-cable has been tested and that there is no problem with the adapters as such. In that case there are still several opportunities for problems: a) the conventions for ground and microphone input that your adapters use differ from the conventions your laptop uses. ...


1

Feed the audio from all the sources into a mixer. Use the mixer's routing capabilities to send your chosen selection of them to the streaming input and (maybe a different selection) to your headphones. Behringer, among others, offes a range of cheap mixers that will do this.


1

Almost all lav mics work the same way. They require what is known as pip for plug-in-power, that is a voltage feed of around 5V. The P4 does not have any input giving this kind of power. You can get an adapter for this, I use Rode VXLR+ myself (NOTE: the + in the name, the version without + does not output pip). You use that connector or similar on an XLR ...


1

Yes. It doesn't take much computer power by today's standards to record a few tracks of audio. And the Focusrite is a competent interface. You could probably get just as good a result with a mic half the price though. Above a certain price level mics might sound different, but not really 'better'. Have you got a really nice-sounding room to record in? ...


1

Try the simple adapter. When I started gigging, PA amps had Lo-Z and Hi-Z mic jacks. But inputs on today's gear are very forgiving, a high input impedance with plenty of gain is typical and accepts most sources. The only Hi-Z input you're likely to see will be for a VERY high impedance source like a guitar pickup. For the price of a simple adapter... ...


1

No. Your Xonar expects a different type of mic. I'm afraid that JTS mic looks absolutely horrible! The cheapest mic worth buying might be a USB mic for about twice that price. Some are designed to flatter a vocalist when used hand-held and close, others are more suitable for recording 'the whole room'.


1

If mic volume is an issue, I recommend a gain booster such as FetHead or Cloudlifter. Both run on phantom power, and, if needed, FetHead has a version that will supply phantom power to the mic. Note that different mics will have different levels. For example, a condenser mic with phantom power may have a stronger signal than a dynamic mic. A condenser mic ...


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