10

[are there] any guidelines as far as recording a mechanical instrument versus using a midi controller or synth? No, only pros and cons. It all depends on what you want the finished product to sound like, and what instruments and equipment you have available to you. Are there any benefits to recording a real instrument [eg piano]? Assuming you have an ...


8

The real instrument will sound more real, but as you note, there are many challenges to recording acoustic instruments or anything with a microphone that are completely bypassed when using a virtual instrument plugin. With a plugin, you don't have to have an audio interface, microphone or cables. You don't have to have an actual acoustic instrument, which ...


6

Hardware instruments (e.g. digital pianos) have a limit on the number of simultaneous notes that they can produce - this part of their spec is called "polyphony". As Todd explained, once you exceed the limit, notes start getting cut off. Some instruments try to do this in a clever way, cutting off the least noticeable notes; others are a bit more basic, just ...


6

You're probably running out of voices of polyphony. You haven't clarified what virtual instrument or synthesizer is the sound source, but most of them have some sort of voice limit, ranging from 1 to 128 voices. If you keep the damper pedal down, then voices can get used up very quickly. For most instruments, when the voices are used up and another note is ...


6

You needn't calculate or estimate or do fancy math. Others have measured piano string decay rates, and they're messy: Measurements have been made on a high‐quality spinet piano to determine the initial amplitude and decay characteristics of the principal harmonic components of notes covering the entire scale. Decay rates of individual components varied ...


5

I can't speak to the logistics of connecting your particular keyboard. But one piece of software that is useful for this (and has been around forever) is Scala. Depending on the abilities of your equipment, it can export tuning files in various formats or use MIDI pitch bends to allow real-time performance on an instrument that doesn't natively support ...


4

For most instruments (apart from piano), if you have access to the real instrument and a real player, and cost isn't a factor, and realism is seen as a plus point, then you'd probably go for the real instrument. It's very hard to achieve a performance with most synthesizers (including plugins) where all the articulations sound at they would on a real ...


2

No, a MIDI keyboard on its own makes no sound. Usually these are called MIDI “controllers”. These days, MIDI controllers are generally designed to work well with computers and specifically certain software packages. For example, the Arturia KeyLab controllers work especially well with the Arturia software synthesizer apps, and will also integrate with other ...


2

Your best bet is to use a VST host and VST plugins. VST plugins are pieces of software that either generate or modify sounds; software synthesizers and effects, so to speak. As the name "plugin" implies, they aren't standalone, but operate inside some other piece of software, the "host" - often a "Digital Audio Workstation" (DAW) like Reaper, which is ...


2

The MIDI keyboard doesn't actually make any sound. It needs somewhere a MIDI sound generator to convert MIDI into sounds. (You can generally choose which instrument you want to play with the keyboard from the ones available on your sound module.) The sound module you use might be a separate piece of hardware (a box with a MIDI in connector and an analogue ...


2

I don't know about your first question, but as for 2 and 3, yes. As long as each device supports MIDI in and MIDI out, they should be able to chain together appropriately. Double check with each device though, as some devices will process MIDI in instead of forwarding it. But Ableton is really, REALLY good with MIDI. So as long as your daisy-chained ...


2

Cubase has its Micro Tuner in the MIDI Effects section. I'm not clear if different tunings can be set in different octaves. From the description I suspect not, but I'll check when I get to my 'big' computer where Cubase lives! https://steinberg.help/cubase_plugin_reference/v9/en/_shared/topics/plug_ref/micro_tuner_r.html


1

They are different. Non-weighted keyboards are based on springs, so the feel is very different from the keys of a piano. Weighted keyboards have counterweights or resistance on the spring to mimic the feel of a real piano. Semi-weighted is somewhere in the middle, they have counterweights or resistances that counter the springy feel of the keyboard, but ...


1

It depends on your software and there might be some tricky configuration, but the short answer is yes. For example, you can definitely do this in Apple Mainstage and Ableton Live.


1

Any electric keyboard sold today will have MIDI. It will be capable of being used as a MIDI controller with something ELSE making the sound. 20 years ago the 'something' might well have been a stand-alone 'sound module'. Now it's probably going to be a computer. If the keyboard is sold as a 'MIDI controller', that's very likely ALL it does. As you talk ...


1

I think miking up a piano for the first time in your life, in a non-tuned room, is going to be several levels of hell harder than getting something acceptable out of a sample player. Piano recording is a whole study in itself & really no two engineers agree on exactly which is the 'best' way. Conversely, pretty much any half decent piano 'rompler' will ...


1

In Linux, sequencer ports can be shared, but raw MIDI ports are exclusive. As a workaround, load the snd-virmidi module to create a virtual raw MIDI port, tell that program to use it, and connect the corresponding sequencer port to the actual hardware output (with aconnect). That virtual port can then also be used by arecordmidi.


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