Hot answers tagged

33

Middle C, the C written below the treble clef and above the bass clef, has MIDI note 60. Conventionally, this note is referred to as C4. However, Yamaha refers to MIDI note 60 (middle C) as C3. Another major music equipment company, Roland, refers to this note as C4, as is conventional. Therefore, the first note in your first diagram is B4 in “Roland pitch”...


24

Yes, MIDI is primarily a communications protocol. But it also includes specifications for the General MIDI sound set. 128 sounds. Here they are, with their Program Change numbers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_MIDI#Piano It wasn't ALL that long ago that sound files were unmanageably large for sending over the internet. So a lot of music was ...


15

The MIDI specification says: If an instrument receives two or more Note On messages with the same key number and MIDI channel, it must make a determination of how to handle the additional Note Ons. It is up to the receiver as to whether the same voice or another voice will be sounded, or if the messages will be ignored. The transmitter, however, must send a ...


14

General Midi specifies a mapping. Roland's GS standard adds to it as does Yamaha's XG standard. Your exact keyboard (and possibly drum preset itself) may vary. see http://pianocheetah.com/midi/drum.html and wikipedia:


14

Yes, it's correct that there is a MIDI standard which relates to your question, but what you are talking about predates MIDI and has more to do with the history of sample-based keyboard instruments. The MIDI 1.0 Specification was published in 1985, but didn't include specific instrument voices like you are talking about, and was only an abstract ...


13

Musescore is free as opposed to many other programs such as Sibelius or Finale. However, it is still very good and can do almost everything that paid programs can do. One of the input files accepted in Musescore is MIDI and it can output PDF among other formats. However, as guidot said, it takes a human to do it right because a MIDI file does not contain ...


13

I've used this before and I know there is a ton of documentation for this program. If you scan the documentation you can find out what the results of each event means. This is directly from the documentation: Track, Time, Note_on_c, Channel, Note, Velocity Send a command to play the specified Note (Middle C is defined as Note number 60; all other notes are ...


12

This has been a raging debate for the past 30 years or so. There has been a healthy competition between the two platforms in an effort to corner a large segment of the market share. In the beginning, Macs targeted the creative artsy types and the platform had features and benefits specifically geared to favor musicians and photographers and graphic ...


11

MIDI is not sound. The MIDI specification does not dictate what any instrument sounds like, it's up to the synthesizer to generate the sound. Free synths sound like crap, but good ones can sound as good as the creators can make them. For example, the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtrack is entirely synthesized, yet most people don't even realize it.


11

As I understand it the fifth is generated by always adding seven to the MIDI note number, and the third is generated by adding four. Correct - even more specifically, the perfect fifth is generated by always adding seven to the MIDI note number, and the major third is generated by adding four. However, I don't think it works like that because adding a ...


10

I think that you probably mean "whinnying" of a horse. With brass instruments, it's typically done with a valved instrument, such as a trumpet or a tuba (or valve trombone if you have one.) The sound is typically produced by pressing the valves halfway down and either shaking the instrument (in the case of a trumpet) or by making a very wide vibrato. ...


10

This is too long for a comment, so I'll make it an answer. Let's say you have a round-robin sample program that plays a different speech sample every time. You play this: NoteOn(1,40,100) // "one" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "two" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "three" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "four" NoteOn(1,40,100) // "five&...


9

Yes, there are electronic drums. There will be a tapping sound when playing. This will likely not disturb your neighbors, but your room mate might find it disturbing. I believe that playing with brushes is problematic, but I'm not updated on the technical advancements of electronic drums.


9

That's pretty common. My synth does that, too. Overlapping notes is a grey area in midi. But most synths do perform an implicit noteoff when a noteon comes along on that channel. If you want it to stay on, put them on seperate channels. That'll usually do the trick. Midi is primarily meant for piano. And you find lots of notation that shows a chord ...


9

(I'm asking about something like this segment: 3/4 ^G,3/4 [^D3^D,3/2] =G,3/2 [c/4C,/4] C/4 [d3/8^A,/8] G; taken straight from A Little Fight Mewsic by Homestuck) You seem to be confused about what MIDI is. I'm not sure where you got that, but the above clip is emphatically not MIDI. MIDI is a binary format, and as such, is not really human readable. Here, ...


8

As per the previous answers, there are electronic kits that are effectively silent, insofar as you only get the sound of a stick striking a rubber pad or, in the cases of some e-kits, mesh heads. However, I'm an acoustic drummer and I've found playing on electronic kits to be problematic: they're invariably fixed to a frame, so you can be limited in where ...


8

MIDI is only a specification for what instrument (patch) to use, what notes to play, how long and loud to play a note and other things like tempo, time signature and text lyrics. The concept is very similar to how an old player piano works. The midi data is like the piano roll, the sound you hear is from the physical sound produced when the hammers strike ...


8

It won't go out the midi port to your keyboard, but the midi sequencer programs that display notation need it if they're going to show the music in standard notation. It's also helpful if you're a composer and want to know what the key is. Without it, a C4 might be the I, or might be the fifth or somewhere else in the key. You could generally guess based ...


8

Firstly, does your USB keyboard have MIDI out (DIN) sockets as well... ...or is it USB only? If it is USB only, then it is possible to get a hardware converter (from USB to traditional 'DIN' MIDI) that should work as long as the USB Midi keyboard is 'class compliant'. an example is http://www.kentonuk.com/products/items/utilities/usb-host.shtml. Once you ...


8

MIDI (SMF) files specify a PPQ (ticks per quarter note) value, which is used as the base for all timestamps. Many programs use a value of 96 or 192 by default. The specification allows much larger values (up to 32767), but many programs do not bother to make this configurable. Another way of getting faster timing would be to use 1/128th notes, but with ...


8

This can be achieved by using tags (see the documentation), for example as follows: \version "2.18.2" myMusic = { \relative c' { c4 d e f | \tag #'printonly { \override NoteHead.style = #'cross f4 f f f | \revert NoteHead.style } \tag #'midionly { r4 r r r | } g a b c | } } \score { \removeWithTag #'...


7

With my MIDI sequencer, you figure that out on your own. You drag rectangles around the hand's notes that are the easiest to pick out, and that'll move them to that other hand's track. So, manually, you: Figure out if the piece is even playable by a human - sometimes it's for a computer to play (a bunch of hugely complex, blisteringly fast arpeggios a ...


7

The file is a list of 128 integers -- each of which is the frequency of the corresponding midi note in miliHertz. The first line gives the frequency for midi note 0, the next for midi note 1 and so on. For A440, 12-tone equal temperament, lines 65-72 (inclusive) would be: --lines 1-64 (midi notes 0-63) snipped >> # next is midi 64 329628 349228 369994 ...


7

MIDI is just a stream of instructions, like: "Tell channel 1 to turn on note 60" "Tell channel 2 to turn off note 72" "Tell channel 3 to set parameter 1 to value 231" There is a set of conventions such as: Channel 1 is piano, 34 is electric bass, etc. Parameter 1 is modulation, 7 is volume, 64 is sustain, etc. This is called General MIDI (Wikipedia). ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible