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This assumes that your band will sound the same every time, and throughout the entire performance. In practice, on every gig I start out with a slightly different setup, and I keep having to adjust the mix throughout a performance. These are subtle changes, but sometimes 2 dB is the difference between having a guitar nicely embedded in the mix or not ...


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What exactly are the bad frequencies? I can sweep across the audio spectrum and a lot of frequencies can sound "bad", so what exactly should I be cutting specifically and to what degree of decibels? There's no general answer to this: it depends on the instrument, the recording system and the room. You want to avoid resonances, where one frequency sounds ...


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If you know the key of the song, you can use one of those frequency/keyboard graphs to find the fundamental frequencies for your track. Most people use their ears to do this but its nice to cheat sometimes. For example, my song is in the key of A major and I know A is 440hz. Based on that I know where the A frequencies exist within the frequency range like: ...


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The best way to use an equaliser is not to NEED to use it. Yes, some instruments share a frequency range, playing them together can sound muddy. So DON'T play that pair of instruments together. It's called good orchestration, and it's been part of the composer's art for a thousand years. You say "the general approach is cut out the "bad frequencies" and ...


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The use of EQ is twofold: to try to give each instrument/part it's own space in the spectrum. First up - think about what the objective is of a good mix? You want to hear each part that contributes to the musical arrangement, clearly and in it's own space. Of course, you can't do any better than the raw material that you have recorded here! So already part ...


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There is no one way to use an EQ, but there are a few common techniques that people use to EQ, and they can be applied on most sources. First a few general tips: Make small changes. EQs are not magic, and they will not instantly improve your recording. They are best for making small tweaks. Be careful with boosting. It's oftentimes better to attenuate ...


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This is the 'holy grail' of the beginner sound engineer - how to make a mix that's portable. The only way to really do it is practise. Headsets of any kind are notoriously forgiving compared to speakers, so concentrate on getting it right on many sets of speakers. Mix, play it on 10 different systems, see if you can figure the 'global average' of what's ...


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