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10

There's no specific passage. Gould suggests that Gibbons introduced the idea of modulation (as we'd call it in tonal terminology; Gibbons had no word for it). In a mode, you don't "change keys" as such: you just finish one piece, and then start chanting another in a different key, ahem, mode. That's why, in the middle of a piece of Gregorian chant, you ...


8

Our three major modes are Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian. The Roman numerals for these are: Ionian I ii iii IV V vi vii° Lydian I II iii ♯iv° V vi vii Mixolydian I ii iii° IV v vi ♭VII You'll notice that both Ionian and Lydian have a major V chord, meaning that the standard cadence of V–I is possible in these two major modes. (Whether it's ...


7

All modal jazz means is that the harmony is deliberately static so that the players can stretch out against it as well as with it in a more elastic fashion. It's not really something you could even say was "invented". While "Kind of Blue", put it on the map, there are boat loads of tunes preceding that album that are modal in at least sections. "Dark Eyes" ...


6

Wow, those two columns seem pretty pointless, seeing as they are completely the same everywhere except when they’re blank. It seems like it must be referring to the fact that it’s the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th scale degrees that provide the different colors of the modes, while the 1st, 4th and 5th are more stable, foundational tones. For example, the major and ...


6

Gould's statement is (at a minimum) hyperbole, since there is no single composer or even a single historical period which one can justifiably call “the end of modality” or “the beginning of tonality”. The practices which we lump together as “common-practice tonality” emerged from a very long historical process of change that arguably begins in the 14th ...


5

You're confusing keys with the modes of a key. And you're confusing what is 'easy' to do with what is interesting to do. 'Easy' can be bland. Yes, if you're in C major (or one of its modes) it's easy to slip into G major or F major (or one of their modes). But those are 'easy' modulations, not interesting ones. And if it's a song, a shift of a 5th up ...


4

There is not just one modal style. Do you mean Medieval modal, modal folk, modal jazz, modal rock? I'll address two. In terms of standards, the clausula vera is the standard cadence in Medieval modal music. I think it is worth noting that even in this early style the mode could be chromatically altered to form a cadence. Your outline of cadences in the ...


3

This is just the A minor blues scale with an added major seventh.


3

To try to simplify with an answer- Each mode has a parent key. Let's take C Dorian as a first example. Its parent key is Bb. All the notes found in C Dorian are also in Bb major. So it should come as no surprise that all the chords that fitted with something in Bb, as long as it doesn't modulate, will fit over notes from a song in C Dorian. Let's take G ...


3

If it's just that isolated V chord that is borrowed, then no, I don't see any way to determine whether that chord is borrowed from Ionian or Lydian. (It won't be borrowed from Locrian, because the Locrian V is built a half step lower. In D Locrian, V is built on A♭, whereas it is built on A♮ in D Ionian and D Lydian.) Now, if there are other elements in ...


3

The circle of fifths is showing us what keys are most closely related. Keys that are adjacent have all but one note in common. This means that modulating from one key to an adjacent one will have a smooth transition more easily than less closely related keys, if "properly" executed. This can be boring, as Laurence suggested, but can also provide just what ...


2

Let's think through this in C major: G A D G E F B E C D G C I ii V I These chords are all major with the exception of the D triad, which is minor. But when we make that D triad major, it starts to sound like the dominant of G major (which is also D major). Thus now we're looking at: G A D G ...


2

There is not really a right answer when it comes to choosing which mode of which scale should be played on the chords of a chart. The most fundamental answer is to let your ears be your guide. Yet, some choices may be better than others. Beyond simply looking at the chords above the staff, it is often useful to acknowledge the melody. Consider the ...


2

I am incredibly happy to stumble upon your post, as I have been working out my own theory of modal harmony using similar principles to the ones you described in your original post. I must object with senior basstickler who described modal harmony as being more "bland" when placed alongside tonal harmony. As long as I can remember I've been attracted to ...


2

Dorian is a minor mode, and the v will be minor too. This is similar to the natural minor. The melodic and harmonic minors usually take the dominant as V, making the leading note a semitone under the tonic - far more convincing. That's what's happened here. No particular borrowing, just making things sound more tuneful.


2

It's important to realize that not every scale that can theoretically be played over a dominant seventh chord is also a good choice in a specific musical context. In the case of the given progression the following scales are used in practice: G7 G mixolydian C7 C mixolydian D7#9 D half-whole, D altered, D (minor) blues Eb7#9 Eb half-whole, Eb ...


2

Common scales that "fit" the 7th chord include: Myxolydian (b7) Major pentatonic (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) Bebop (b7, natural 7) Lydian dominant (#4, b7) Whole tone Diminished (half, then whole steps) Diminished whole tone (b2, b3, b4, b5, b6, b7 - most common on "#9b13" chords) If you haven't seen this video from the "Jazz Tutorials" channel, I would strongly ...


2

The functionality will remain the same, as ♭II7 can be resolved to I the same way your Gm chord would be. However, you will lose the modality of the progression, because ♭II7 doesn't imply that mixolydian sound you have going when using the Gm. Also, Tim pointed out that the Gm might want to resolve to C7, then to F, but I think that that would depend on how ...


2

No. G Phrygian uses all the notes from the parent scale of Eb. E Phrygian uses the notes from the parent scale C. They are not the same set of notes. I suspect you meant: 'If I play the Eb scale, and start on G (the 3rd, therefore G Phrygian), if others are playing the Ionian of Eb, are we all using the same notes?' Then, since Eb is the parent, then - yes! ...


1

Jazz musicians in the 50s and 60s were forever searching for new sounds. Trane was known to make use of Slominsky's book. Given that these modes are simply major scales starting from not the tonic, it is pretty unlikely that musicians in that period would not have started making use of them. Bartok was undoubtably a great, but to credit him with more than ...


1

I think that your motivation for seeing this as a modal technique is that you are focused on the character of dominant 7th chords, and using that character as a compositional device. But that isn't enough to make this a modal approach. A dominant 7th chord isn't a mode, and you could associate a number of modes with such a chord, which is to say that you ...


1

I would say that a circle of fifths progression in modal music is just as practical, or impractical, as in tonal music. The effect of motion is similar, and runs the same risk of getting boring if carried too far.


1

You flatten all the 7ths but avoid settling on the subdominant chord too much. But really, why set out to write in Mixolydian? Write a tune, maybe it will turn out to be Mixolydian. Think 'Oh listen, that's Mixolydian. Interesting...' then carry on. Maybe it will stay in Mixolydian, maybe not. Quite likely it will 'mix' a lot of modes. A basic blues ...


1

Michael Curtis astutely points out that C mixolydian doesn't have a proper V7 chord, because the fifth degree chord is Gmin7, not G7. Hence, including either G7 or D♭7 in your progression will represent a deviation from the modal sound you seek. However, that doesn't mean the song won't still sound modal. Many jazz standards that are considered modal ...


1

...I-IV-V-I chord prog, in C mixolidian: C-F-Gm-C... You're mixing up symbols and tonalities. If C mixolydian, then the V - the triad on the dominant/^5 scale degree is a minor chord, so lower case v. C-F--Gm-C C mixo: I-IV-v--I If we speak properly of a dominant chord then the chord must have a leading tone the ^7 scale degree one half-step ...


1

Yes, Db7 acts as a dominant of C. We call it a 'tritone substitution' partly because its root is a tritone from the 'real' dominant - G, but mostly because it shares the tritone interval - F and B (Cb) - with the G7 chord. But you want to be Mixolidian. That's fine, but Mixolydian doesn't have a dominant 7th chord containing a tritone. It doesn't even ...


1

Tritone substitution relies on the juxtaposition of the 3rd and b7 of two chords. So, in key C, the dominant G7 will have Db7 as its tts. G7 is G B D F, whereas Db7 is Db F Ab Cb. So, the F changes place (3rd>7th), and the same sounding B/Cb goes the other way. With your suggestion, there's only one common note between Gm and Db7. That's the F. So it's not ...


1

Both of these points are correct, but based on different ideas. In your first example (from your guitar teacher) you are naming chords which work with the modes from the same root note, e.g. C Ionian works with C Major or C Major7. This works because each note contained in the chord is also contained in the mode. There are also more chord extensions which ...


1

This reply finally arrived from the author of the book today (12/3/2017): Sorry for the delay. I had a look at Jazzology today. First, let me explain how we wrote this book. Nor [my co-author] provided the outline and charts, and I wrote the text. So this chart was conceived by him, and I just signed off on it. To me, it seems that he's saying ...


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