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37

I don't know that there is any evidence that the tritone was ever formally banned by the Catholic Church, although that story does get passed around a lot. An actual Church document that discusses this and puts the claim in context is needed. I see no mention of tritones or intervals of any type in Musicam Sacram of 1967. The Sacrosanctum Concilium of 1963, ...


22

The Locrian mode does not need any reason to exist, it simply does. It would seem stranger that we would give names to all of the other note collections built from the degrees of the Major scale, yet leave the seventh degree out. The confusion here seems to be one about functional harmony. The idea of a tonic is part of functional harmony, but the idea of a ...


14

Tritones have been used since Gregorian Chant days. There are several common patterns that outline a tritone and a few instances where a direct tritone is used. The term "Devil's Interval" seems to refer to the difficulty of resolving the interval rather than in forbidding its use. One amusing (if true) use was the direct F to B (I think downward) interval ...


14

My understanding is before 1970, no Jazz players thought about modes. This is incorrect, see this question: How does modal jazz use chord progressions? A: Modes became of interest over time as a way to organize what pitches to use over certain chords and sounds. This is a naturally arising phenomenon when there are many sounds to consider and memorize what ...


13

mode = set of notes + tonic Modes sound different, because each scale degree's distance to the tonic i.e. home note is different. The home note is in a different location relative to the other notes of the scale. The tonic is your zero-point, your viewpoint, where you place your camera: depending on where it is, everything around you is in a relatively ...


13

Try this - play D E F G A and back again. Then play a C major chord (CEG). Does the chord sound like it would fit under the tune? Possibly not. But you've used 5 of the 7 notes that constitute the C major key! What you heard first was a snippet of tune that probably came from D Dorian - a mode from the parent key C. But it sounded minor, and C is major! It ...


11

It certainly isn't banned now! And the whole historical mythology of banning the 'Devil's interval' though a nice idea, is rather dubious. As well as being the engine of a dominant 7th chord, resolving to a major 3rd (or its inversion, a major 6th) it's almost achieved consonance status when used as a b5 by jazz players.


11

Stand in your kitchen and look around you. Now stand on your head in your kitchen, so that you are upside down. Do things look the same? (Or if you're not so good at gymnastics, lie on your back and try the same experiment!) The things in the room are all in the same positions relative to each other; nothing has moved. But the world looks very different ...


10

The simple/traditional approach is for the chords to match the scales you're improvising over. You wouldn't improvise with C Lydian in your right hand and simultaneously play a CMaj11 chord--the F in your left hand would clash with the F♯ in your right hand. Similarly, if you improvise over the V7 chord using the G altered scale, you wouldn't simultaneously ...


10

No, merely starting a phrase on a different note doesn't put you into a different mode. Consistently ENDING phrases on a different note or chord might though! You're in D Dorian rather than C Ionian (equivalent to C major) when D becomes established as the home note. Here's an example.


9

If there are no diminished keys, then why does Locrian mode exist? There are no keys that relate directly to any modes other than the Ionian and Aeolian modes. The Major/Minor system (to which keys relate) isn't intended to be a comprehensive encapsulation of all possibilities of musical tonality. A diminished chord can't work as a tonic due to its ...


9

(at the bottom of this answer, there are youtube example videos with sound) Definition of modes Different modes produce different harmonic feelings. These differences are caused by the notes of the scale having different distances to the home note than in the "normal" major or minor scales you've used to hearing. Because of these differences, the set of ...


9

For example in the background there is playing C major chord and I am playing melody on my guitar. One phrase starts from C note, 3 seconds later, another phrase I play starts from F note. Does it really mean that each phrase is based on different mode? No. Modes are not a classification system for melody snippets based on starting or ending notes. ...


8

A key and its scale are very related, so it's easy to get confused. A key is defined by two things: The "main" note. You'll hear it called the "center of gravity" or "tonal center" or "home" note. It's the note to which a melody wants to resolve. The proper name for this note is the tonic. The relationship of the tonic to the other notes. There are many ...


8

how can i know the scale ? For example, how to differentiate between C major scale, A minor scale, C ionian scale, E phrygian scale?? All of them are on white keys on piano.!! You need to learn to feel what note is the tonic or 'home note' - the note that the piece of music "pulls towards" or comes "home" to. This sense of coming home can come from various ...


8

You can play pretty much anything, depending on context and what has been established both melodically and harmonically. All modes derived from the mayor scale are commonly used: Lydian easily fits any mayor chord Locrian can be played over V (VII m7b5 as diatonic substitution of V7) Phrygian can easily fit any minor chord (using that b2 as leading tone ...


8

The difference is all about what is the tonic and how a tone become perceived as the tonic. In C major C is the tonic. In E Phrygian E is the tonic. Unless you're talking about Gregorian chant (no chords) I think the most practical way of understanding the tonic is through harmony. Let's look at the group of tones D E F and melodically target E... ...at ...


7

The question mixes up key with scale. In a very basic sense a key is defined by a tonic and a chord either major or minor triad built on the tonic, and a dominant tone a perfect fifth above the tonic and a major triad built on the dominant. This is what makes a key. Simply selecting a set of chords by permuting the a diatonic scale doesn't produce a key. ...


7

As you say, a scale is purely a set of notes in ascending/descending order. Any set of notes. Every note in semitones (chromatic scale). Notes in specific spacing (major, minor scale). Notes a tone apart (whole tone scale). The list goes on - and on. I doubt if you could come up with a set of notes that hasn't been used as a 'scale' already, but it's an ...


6

Historically, the modes were methods of classifying chants. There were few if any chants having the note patterns that fit the Ionian or Aeolian or Locrian modes. Later (1400s or so) Locran wasn't used as the natural fifth above the final note (B) was diminished. Actually, in the earliest known chant descriptions, the note B was mutable (B soft written "B" ...


5

I think he's got the right answer but the wrong reason. There's no problem hearing a tonic as 'home' in any of the modes. But tonal harmony is all about dominant-tonic relationships, about there being a chord that has a strong tendency TOWARDS the tonic. You need a major dominant chord, containing the leading note a semitone below the tonic, and all the ...


5

Do different modes have the same cadence structure? No In major and minor keys, the perfect cadence is V to I Correct. For minor keys some write the Roman numerals V i with lower case for the minor tonic. Keep in mind that the dominant triad must be major for a major/minor key perfect cadence. Will this structure remain the same in a different mode? ...


5

The notes in that intro are E, G, Bb, and A. There aren't enough notes here to form a standard scale or mode, but you could notice that E-G-Bb form a diminished triad and postulate an E Locrian mode. Given that F# makes an appearance later I might be inclined to consider E Locrian 2 (also called E Aeolian b5), which is the 6th mode of the G Melodic Minor ...


5

Yes, you're correct! (One might say that it's actually relative to major instead of Ionian, but that's being pretty fussy.) The only thing to watch out for is the accidentals that are "hidden" in some of the Roman numerals. Imagine you're in D and you want to add in the II chord that's borrowed from Lydian. There's no accidental with that II Roman numeral, ...


5

There are some things in music where there are standards and standard usages. Much of standard notation is, well, standard; things like the MIDI protocol and file formats are standardised; a concert pitch of A4=440 is an agreed-on standard (albeit not the only one). However, when it comes to what notes and tonalities to choose, There is (thankfully!) no ...


5

This is a technique that will result in scales with no avoid notes. A few more are m6: melodic minor m7(b5): locrian ♮2 dim7: diminished scale (whole-half) Note that the latter scale has eight notes instead of the usual seven (this is a consequence of the chord having a diminished seventh). It should be clear that this technique for finding chord scales ...


5

Thinking of D Dorian as having the "same notes" as C major is true in absolute terms. But most people hear music relatively to the tonal centre of gravity of the piece. The notes D, E, F, G, A, B, C have completely different relationships to a D tonic than they do to a C tonic, so D Dorian shouldn't sound like C major at all. One practical step to take ...


5

Think of modes as an entirely different scale with a different sound. Personally, I don't like the word "mode", just think "different scale". They like to say mode because it just means a given scale has been circularly shifted left, but that's a bit too technical for most people. But because you've changed the order of the intervals of the notes, that's ...


5

If you are following the standard mode-chord mapping you should use Dorian over the ii Mixolydian over the V7 Ionian over I as your question alludes to. However this is not a useful approach to true improve. If you want to play "out" I find the blues (more specifically the minor blues) can be forced onto almost anything. You have the b5, b3, and b7. ...


5

There have been similar questions on here already. Yes, it does involve using exactly the same notes, but they're focussed differently. Playing in E Phrygian will involve E F G A B C D, but 'home' will be E. Not the C in C Ionian. Playing in the latter, C will feel like it's the root, or home. E Phrygian may well start on that E note, and return to it ...


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