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20

The difference is all about what is the tonic and how a tone become perceived as the tonic. In C major C is the tonic. In E Phrygian E is the tonic. Unless you're talking about Gregorian chant (no chords) I think the most practical way of understanding the tonic is through harmony. Let's look at the group of tones D E F and melodically target E... ...at ...


19

By very definition, the modes are created by taking the Ionian scale/mode and starting at a different point, not by rearranging those intervals at will. According to wikipedia: Modern Western modes use the same set of notes as the major scale, in the same order, but starting from one of its seven degrees in turn as a tonic, and so present a different ...


13

Try this - play D E F G A and back again. Then play a C major chord (CEG). Does the chord sound like it would fit under the tune? Possibly not. But you've used 5 of the 7 notes that constitute the C major key! What you heard first was a snippet of tune that probably came from D Dorian - a mode from the parent key C. But it sounded minor, and C is major! It ...


13

mode = set of notes + tonic Modes sound different, because each scale degree's distance to the tonic i.e. home note is different. The home note is in a different location relative to the other notes of the scale. The tonic is your zero-point, your viewpoint, where you place your camera: depending on where it is, everything around you is in a relatively ...


11

Stand in your kitchen and look around you. Now stand on your head in your kitchen, so that you are upside down. Do things look the same? (Or if you're not so good at gymnastics, lie on your back and try the same experiment!) The things in the room are all in the same positions relative to each other; nothing has moved. But the world looks very different ...


9

No, merely starting a phrase on a different note doesn't put you into a different mode. Consistently ENDING phrases on a different note or chord might though! You're in D Dorian rather than C Ionian (equivalent to C major) when D becomes established as the home note. Here's an example.


9

For example in the background there is playing C major chord and I am playing melody on my guitar. One phrase starts from C note, 3 seconds later, another phrase I play starts from F note. Does it really mean that each phrase is based on different mode? No. Modes are not a classification system for melody snippets based on starting or ending notes. ...


9

(at the bottom of this answer, there are youtube example videos with sound) Definition of modes Different modes produce different harmonic feelings. These differences are caused by the notes of the scale having different distances to the home note than in the "normal" major or minor scales you've used to hearing. Because of these differences, the set of ...


9

You can play pretty much anything, depending on context and what has been established both melodically and harmonically. All modes derived from the mayor scale are commonly used: Lydian easily fits any mayor chord Locrian can be played over V (VII m7b5 as diatonic substitution of V7) Phrygian can easily fit any minor chord (using that b2 as leading tone ...


9

Other answers have pointed out that generally 'the modes' refer to the different points at which you can start on the diatonic scale. As to why that particular repeating sequence ("WWHWWWH...") is important, it's because that sequence of intervals creates frequencies that have particular ratios between them that sound harmonious. Not all permutations of ...


8

There have been similar questions on here already. Yes, it does involve using exactly the same notes, but they're focussed differently. Playing in E Phrygian will involve E F G A B C D, but 'home' will be E. Not the C in C Ionian. Playing in the latter, C will feel like it's the root, or home. E Phrygian may well start on that E note, and return to it ...


8

There's a little ambiguity in what constitutes the "very first modes." There were ancient scale systems in many ancient cultures, which had structures we might call modes in India, China, etc. But I'm assuming the question is asking where the "Western music" modes come from. And the scale for them really comes from Ancient Greece. To expand a bit on ...


8

Instead of looking at it as a flat root note, you can think of it as a major seventh, which is present in the harmonic minor scale. In your first example, that would be E F♯ G A B C D♯ E You can see that notes of both the B major and E minor chords are present. With a sharp 6th, it can also be a melodic minor scale: E F♯ G A B C♯ D♯ E Both scales do miss ...


7

As you say, a scale is purely a set of notes in ascending/descending order. Any set of notes. Every note in semitones (chromatic scale). Notes in specific spacing (major, minor scale). Notes a tone apart (whole tone scale). The list goes on - and on. I doubt if you could come up with a set of notes that hasn't been used as a 'scale' already, but it's an ...


7

There is a lot of question wrapped into one here. The key signature is indicated at the beginning of a piece on the sheet music. For example a song written in they key of C will have no accidentals, one written in A will have (F#, C#, G#) all indicated at the beginning. This does not mean that the song must stay in that key throughout. It is very ...


7

I think your example of toponyms makes the best case. If the adjective really refers to the place or culture, then it's capitalized. If the word has taken on a meaning with no real connection to the place, don't capitalize. Mosaics are an important part of Byzantine art. The path to tenure is byzantine and slow. From my understanding of music history no ...


7

If you want to focus on scales made from steps in the chromatic scale, 12TET tuning, then there are dozens, at least 72 that I can think of (actually twice this if my memory is correct). In the Carnatic style of music from India one builds scales using only notes from the 12TET chromatic scale with a few restrictions. The larger set of Carnatic scales can ...


6

If you are following the standard mode-chord mapping you should use Dorian over the ii Mixolydian over the V7 Ionian over I as your question alludes to. However this is not a useful approach to true improve. If you want to play "out" I find the blues (more specifically the minor blues) can be forced onto almost anything. You have the b5, b3, and b7. ...


6

Ah, once again the mode question, which if I might rephrase, is "if the notes are all the same, why does it sound terrible?" There's an academic answer for this, and it's correct. But in practice I have found that guitar players--a group that typically is not strong in theory--don't get much practical benefit from that explanation. I know because I've tried ...


6

There are infinitely many modes... because there are infinitely many scales to base them on. Most of these scales don't have any notion of whole and half steps at all. But when we're talking about “the modes”, what's generally meant is specifically modes of the diatonic scale, and that constrains you that the half-steps must be seperated by either two or ...


6

I've looked at a few books, only in the text, not lists, and found a few things. One problem is that mode names often occur in lists where every label is capitalized. Likewise, mode names are not consistent through history. The terms protus, deuterus, tritus, and tetradus are not capitalized in the "Cambridge History of Western Music Theory." In the same ...


6

You are playing B naturals in your C chords, making them Cmaj7 chords. The Am scale contains the notes of a D minor scale but with a B natural instead of B flat. That is why it sounds better than the D minor scale. Learn about modes. Modes are in a nutshell a way to extract 7 different scales from one by starting and ending on different notes (D to D, E to ...


6

Preface The TL;DR version is: scroll down to the "Therefore ..." at the end. But if you want the exhaustive (exhausting?) details ... From the Department of Taking Things too Far There is general agreement that the primary pitches are D, E, F, G, A, C. So, here's a detailed look at the other pitches that occur in the song. album version, part I B: ...


5

The modes have different root tones and also different "tenor tones" this means like music in a major key (ionic) has the 5th as dominant all modes have different recitation tones (fifth or sixth). This makes a melody quite different regarding the finalis (final tone) which usually is the root tone and its leading tone. It was Glarean who added to the ...


5

The modes of the middle age church are derived from the antic Greek modes and these are developed from tetrachords, and yes it is something with history ... Early Greek treatises describe three interrelated concepts that are related to the later, medieval idea of "mode": (1) scales (or "systems"), (2) tonos—pl. tonoi—(the more usual term used in medieval ...


5

In order to narrow down the possibilities, let's focus on heptatonic scales with only whole and half tone steps. As a second restriction, let's agree that we don't want two consecutive half steps in our scales. These restrictions might seem arbitrary, but they are quite reasonable from a melodic and harmonic standpoint (for western ears, at least). Apart ...


5

why is this pattern so crucial? It isn't, really - it just happens to subjectively work pretty well, with most of its starting points (apart from, arguably, the Locrian) yielding modes that have interesting harmonic and melodic possibilities. After all, a scale can be composed of any allegedly random set of intervals. Well, it depends what you're trying ...


4

True, the seven modes of one key all contain the same notes as the parent key (Ionian). But it's the key centres that differ. In the Ionian mode (major key)in C, the actual note C is the root, home if you like. When a piece is in that key, the note where everything feels like it's at rest best is that C. All the other notes bear some relationship to that ...


4

I would add to Tim's answer the following to address your comment on it being cultural. Any string of intervals might work but typically notes repeat after an octave and most cultures (but NOT ALL) tend to keep the scale structure within the octave. There are some very noteworthy exceptions. For example a scale (or melodic pattern) commonly used in ...


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