Skip to main content
24 votes

With modern electronic technology is temperament unnecessary?

In principle, the answer is yes, with software instruments it is feasible to (re-)set the tuning so that you can realize music with modulation that stays in just intonation across these changes. The ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 17.8k
22 votes
Accepted

modulating from G major to G# major

Any readers may thank you more if the new key becomes Ab. Ab has only 4 flats in it, whereas G# has 8 sharps. The simplest, which always works, pretty well whichever key you're changing into, is to ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
19 votes
Accepted

Chopin Polonaise in Ab major, op 53 change in key

You're exactly right! It's technically a motion to ♭VI, which would be F♭ major. But in order to make it easier to read, he spells it in E major (♯V). F♭ isn't in A♭ major, but it is in A♭ minor; ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
17 votes

With modern electronic technology is temperament unnecessary?

You cannot even realize "just temperament" reliably when you are working with continuous-tone instruments like singers and trombones. Take a look at even something as old as J.S. Bach's mass in B ...
user31386's user avatar
  • 171
16 votes

Can the same song be written in a minor key and major key with the progression written differently?

The scale/chords are good clues to the key of a song, but at least as important is the tonal center. That's not as easy to define but generally it's where the song comes back to a place of less ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 57.2k
13 votes

With modern electronic technology is temperament unnecessary?

It's a bit more complicated than may appear at first glance. Within a single key, if Just Intonation makes the I,IV, and V chords all (4,5,6) ratios, the ii chord will be off. The other question is ...
ttw's user avatar
  • 25.7k
13 votes

"Punning chord"

Great question; this is a particularly clever part of music theory! Here's a nice little example in F major; it's just a I--V7--I progression with a little cadential six-four thrown in there just ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
13 votes
Accepted

What's the exact difference between modulation, key change and tonicisation?

I think your intuition is mostly correct when it comes to modulation. I would make only one small adjustment: most scholarship tends to view a change in tonic as different from a change in mode. In ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
13 votes
Accepted

What is the musical term for a song that uses a higher key for its last chorus?

Actually none of these are examples of singing in a higher octave, they are examples of “modulation”, a changing of key, usually to a key that is a semitone to a few semitones higher than the original....
John Belzaguy's user avatar
12 votes

Why isn't there a closely related key to C minor that has D as tonic?

Closely related keys are keys with key signatures within one accidental of each other. Find the number of accidentals in the given key signature, then find the keys that have that same number (and ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
12 votes
Accepted

How can I explain/understand a flattened 2nd in a minor melody

Those flattened 2nd scale degrees could point to tonicization of or temporary modulation to the subdominant (e.g. if ^1-^♭2-^1-^4 is harmonized as i-VI/iv-V/iv-iv). But those flattened 2nd scale ...
Dekkadeci's user avatar
  • 14.2k
12 votes

If there is a double sharp on a note, does that mean the piece has modulated?

Let's restate your question generally as: "does an accidental mean the piece has modulated?" An accidental in a passage does not necessarily mean the music has modulated. Sometimes chromatic ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
11 votes

With modern electronic technology is temperament unnecessary?

"just intonation better than equal temperament" Judgement call there. When instruments are slightly off perfect ratios, there can be very appealing beating and chorus effects. Piano strings are ...
Phil Freihofner's user avatar
10 votes

When did the half-step/whole-step modulation in the middle of a song become popular?

Although I already provided a lengthy answer for this question which got accepted, I've never quite been satisfied with how it addressed the origin of the technique. I merely quote a passage from a ...
Caleb Hines's user avatar
  • 20.8k
10 votes
Accepted

How to modulate very smoothly and stealthily from major to minor?

Within a minimalist sort of setting, one approach I might take would be to boil things down to just the root or root and fifth. If you have a long enough period of time where you don't have a third ...
Basstickler's user avatar
  • 7,429
10 votes
Accepted

What type of modulation goes from D♭ to A?

By definition, a modulation must reach a cadence in the new key. Since there is no cadence on B♭♭ here, it's technically incorrect to call this a modulation. Instead, he's simply using a B♭♭ chord ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
9 votes

modulating from G major to G# major

Just jumping up the key up a semitone without a chord progression to lead into the modulation is a very common musical trope! Simply change the key signature in-between two major sections of a song, ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 3,133
9 votes

If parallel keys aren't closely related, then why are they so easy to get to?

Closely related keys are keys that have at most one accidental difference. So the set of notes inside the key are almost identical (or identical in the case of relative major/minor keys). You can get ...
Dom's user avatar
  • 47.7k
9 votes

Why does G-Major work well within a C-Minor progression?

The G major chord is the "usual" dominant in the key of C minor. The harmonic point is the half-step approach to the note C from B. It is extremely common. As a side note, often, when a ...
ttw's user avatar
  • 25.7k
9 votes

Theories on what key to modulate to

There are two broad categories. Modulation to closely related keys - 'keeping it in the family'. And modulation to more distant keys for contrast. The first kind include modulation to the dominant, ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.7k
8 votes

What intervals are common for sudden key changes?

It depends on what genre you're looking at, but here are a few other quick ways: Down a minor third. This is often done by way of a "common tone modulation," where a pitch (or two) are held over into ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
8 votes

What does Schoenberg mean by "intermediary region"?

From what I can tell, Schoenberg's term here is ambiguous and, honestly, unimportant. Imagine we're in C major. Now, imagine we modulate to E major. There's occasionally a gray area between the "...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Can I use the German sixth chord to modulate to another key?

All of these answers are correct, but I thought it would be helpful to the OP (and hopefully future readers) to give some clear examples. The above example is just a clear use of a German augmented ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Can you tonicize to a chord that's not on the original key?

Can you tonicize to a chord that's not on the original key? Absolutely. This is not only "allowed", but commonplace, especially by the time Chopin was composing. One of the compositional ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.1k
8 votes

Explain to a pop pianist: GECE to GC#A#C# alberti bass transition in K.545 2nd movt

This is a case where it's probably helpful to think of the passage melodically rather than harmonically. Consider each note in the Alberti bass as a separate voice in a melodic line. In that case, ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.1k
7 votes

Can I use the German sixth chord to modulate to another key?

Hippie answer: You can do whatever you want. Constructive answer: Yes, this is a good way to modulate up a half step.
MattPutnam's user avatar
  • 22.4k
7 votes
Accepted

If parallel keys aren't closely related, then why are they so easy to get to?

The issue here is to define "closely related" and "easy to get to". Here is my take on those phrases: Closely related: Two keys are closely related when they share similar key signatures. For ...
nivlac's user avatar
  • 318
7 votes

If parallel keys aren't closely related, then why are they so easy to get to?

Well, "easy to get to" isn't exactly a very precise term musically. For a good example, note that from A major, B♭ major is almost as unrelated as it gets. However, lots of songs will just shift up a ...
user45266's user avatar
  • 12.7k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible