11

This is only for comfort. The part where you hold the trombone is not very ergonomical so we search for as comfortable position as possible, with control of the instrument. Try various hand positions yourself to see which works best for you. Ideally you should not lift you left shoulder at all (do check in a mirror, lifting left shoulder will with time lead ...


6

What makes this complicated is that different brands of mouthpiece makers use different labeling methods for these characteristics. Generally speaking though, you can make the following deductions: Tip Opening: This is the distance from the tip of the reed to the tip of the mouthpiece (when a reed is in place). The wider the tip opening (or higher the ...


4

The best choice will be that you take your instrument with you to the shop when you once will change the mouthpiece. With lower instruments the size of the mouthpiece may always be a problem but for trumpet mouthpieces, a "standard" crystallized for once. Nowadays a cone ratio of 1:20 is chosen for the cone for TRUMPET MOUTHPIECES. This is the case since ...


4

You don't need to fuss over choosing a mouthpiece at your stage. Use the standard one that came with the clarinet. If you've broken it, just go for ebonite with a medium tip. You shouldn't have to spend as much as half of your £80. Choice of reed strength will make much more difference.


2

You can't. Apart from anything else, this presupposes that there is an ideal mouthpiece for each instrument. When you come around to doing subjective tests (unless you discard the whole project in avour of something more workable) I suggest you ask players to choose the worst mouthpiece from a batch, not the best. I suspect this will produce slightly more ...


2

I've got a silver guardala studio mouthpiece on my tenor, and I've started using alto reeds on that. It's a very slim mouthpiece.


2

I just asked a trombonist; the answer was, that it is a convenient place to press against, so the instrument does not tilt, since it requires less effort than more forceful grip.


2

I dunno why you use a patch but that's more or less beside the point. My teeth are uneven as well; my correction was to let the mouthpiece "settle" into my embouchure. The most comfortable position was with the mouthpiece offset in my mouth by a millimeter or so -- which means I (or you) have to take care to keep the pressure on the reed side even across ...


2

You need to have your teacher (you DO have one, right?) watch your playing. It's pretty much guaranteed that your embouchure is out of whack, allowing air to escape (and saliva with it). I'll note in passing that reeds are notoriously inconsistent, so the brand is irrelevant here. The strength could be a problem: if you're using a stiffer reed than you ...


2

Yes, mouthpiece fitting - for Bb trumpets at any rate - is standard. (Doubtless someone will find an exception :-) Not for trombones though, there are two sizes.


1

As has been said already, the taper on a trumpet m/p is an industry standard - so it's compatible with every trumpet m/p receiver. Some more esoteric trumpets have a one-piece mouthpiece/mouthpipe combination - but they are well out of the student price range. Nearly all student model trumpets ship with a mouthpiece which is the equivalent of a Bach 7c. ...


1

I am surprised that the clarinet ligature fits on the alto saxophone mouthpiece (I play both.) What do you mean by "fit"? The ligature should fit snugly on the mouthpiece under the "u" part of the reed. It should secure the reed just where the reed and mouthpiece naturally meet. If the ligature is too high, the reed will not vibrate properly.


1

I played clarinet for a year and bass clarinet from Grades 6-12 in school concert bands, and I never had bite marks on any of my mouthpieces. I therefore can't really answer your first question, but I can answer your second--get a new mouthpiece and finish learning how to relax your embouchure fast. I typically tighten my lips when playing clarinets of any ...


1

My research indicates that there are two standard sizes: "The diameter of the bore is defined by the instrument (or better: its type), because the mouthpiece must have the same bore as the rest of the instrument. This is for example 15,2 mm (equals 0.598 inch) for a German style A- or B flat clarinet and it is 14,9 mm (equals 0.587 inch) for an A or B flat ...


1

Metal mouthpieces are slimmer than hard rubber/plastic mouthpieces across the board (for reasons that have to do with tone), so it's not necessarily one specific metal mouthpiece that this would work for.


1

I've been using an alto reed on my vintage otto link metal piece. It has to be slightly off center to correct seal and sounds a tad bit airy. It saves a lot of cash though, and I don't take in much mouthpiece when playing jazz so it's never been an issue. I'm tried it out of being lazy but it's proven to work pretty well.


1

You can just use the wrong reeds. They're not nearly as finicky as some people would have you believe. It's actually pretty common to use one size larger reeds than normal (e.g., tenor sax reeds on alto, or very commonly, Bb clarinet reeds on Eb with a barrel modification so it fits), so going the other way isn't unthinkable.


1

I have a metal selmer mouthpiece for tenor that came with a C Melody horn and the tenor reeds protrude from the side, causing a metal ligature to bend or not completely hug the reed. So I can see his attempt. Gonna go home and try that!


1

It is hard to say what you have, although I suspect it may be a JinBao. Especially if your horn is from eBay as a discount model or from one of the JinBao distributors like Mack Brass, Wessex, esp. Concerning the size: Many manufacturers use the Bach numbering system, of which this is one. "1 1/2" is a general bass trombone size that means roughly 28.2mm ...


1

Honestly, it's the combination of being a collector's item, and they were made very well, and it's quite likely that it's been refaced by a master refacer at that price which is worth a lot too. If you don't care about the collector's item part, you can get just as good a mouthpiece from a modern link copy, but if you want it just as good, expect to pay what ...


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