15

It's good to keep in mind that it takes a lot of practice to learn an instrument. You have to dedicate a lot of time and it will take years to become a good piano player (same for all the instruments). So, if you want to learn how to play multiple instruments, you will have to practice all of them. If you don't have a lot of time, it will be hard to practice ...


10

Break the problem down into the smallest steps possible. The problem is that you need to be keeping two rhythms going at once, one for the guitar and one for your voice. You've already got: The ability to sing the song with good timing and rhythm The ability to play the guitar with good timing and rhythym You need a way to put the two together. Here's a ...


7

Absolutely. JB Arban once said that people have the wrong idea about embouchure - that it's a fixed thing like a statue. He said that embouchure is fluid - you need to do what's right and what sounds good. I am not surprised that you have difficulties with flute after trombone; remember how each instrument works: The flute is like a fickle bottle - you ...


7

It's generally considered that keyboard (piano) is the best instrument to use when trying to understand (unravel!) theory. If you mean a piano accordion, then the keyboard part is similar - except it's not as readily see-able as a piano. You've also other issues, like left hand is doing something entirely different, AND you have to keep the thing moving ...


6

I'm a professional tubist, and I also play trumpet as well - among other noise makers. I can tell you first-hand that playing trumpet or other instruments will generally not affect your ability to play tuba. It is good you are staying within the brass family as it is the least discouraging. When moving through brass instruments of different sizes, it is ...


6

If the player has a good ear (and you're not asking them to do really virtuosic playing), then the "embouchure shock" should be fairly minimal. As long as they're still reading transposed treble clef music, the fingerings will be exactly the same, with the notable exception of french horn (or is that a brass band instrument to start with?). Tuba doesn't ...


5

I am learning to self-accompany on harp, and I have experienced exactly the same problem. You've already got some good suggestions. To add to them: something I've found beneficial is to conceptualize the thing-that-hands-are-doing and the thing-the-voice-is-doing as a single thing, and practice accordingly. To explain that -- one approach already ...


4

Regarding destroying the amplifier, this is not going to be a problem with the Looper. It is designed to be in line with a guitar or a keyboard, and you can set the volume levels of your loops. You shouldn't worry about or output impedance either. Input is 1MOhm, and output is 100Ohm - which are fine for this usage. You may not need the mixer - the looper ...


3

There isn't a set "number of strums", really. Also, I tend to agree with Johnny Strings to start simple. One thing that may also be helpful is to simply make sure you hit one, single chord, while at the same time singing the first word of the verse. Let the chord ring and continue singing through the verse until the next chord comes up. Do the same thing ...


3

I'd recommend chromatic button accordion since its keys are arranged according to chromatic pitch, like those of the guitar, making it better suitable for improvised playing. The keys of a piano (or piano accordion) instead mimic the note layout in scores: if you are going to do a lot of sightreading, that simplifies things. Button accordions (particularly ...


3

Your biggest problem may be reading in the bass clef. The valves on most (I think) 3 valved brass do the same job, and the dots will be in a key which compensates for the pitch (as in, if it's a Bb instrument, and the tune is in C, the dots will be written in D ). Don't feel the embouchure will be a big deal, and you'll quickly re-adapt after. In fact, you ...


3

From my own experience, I'd like to think that playing the guitar while watching TV has helped the ability to play while doing other things. As for specific approaches to learn to sing and play at the same time: Learn both the accompaniment and the lyrics/melody separately and thoroughly. When playing and singing at the same time, use a very simplified ...


3

I play both piano and accordion and I would say piano, because: There's a huge amount of piano learning material and sheet music for piano. Accordion has some learning material and music but it's not uncommon for there not to be an accordion arrangement of a song you want to play. Far easier to find a piano teacher than an accordion teacher Easier to see ...


3

Certainly! When I was learning piano and guitar (a long, long time ago) if there was something that didn't make sense musically on one, the other was consulted, often making sense of the problem. Admittedly, usually solved by piano, with its graphical layout of notes. Harmonies, intervals, chords, voicings et al all made more sense having two instruments ...


3

Yes, to a small extent. I play piano and sax. To steal a quote, I'm not just untalented, I'm multi-untalented! From my experience, the different instruments have taught me different aspects of music, which then transition back to the other instrument. For example, learning sax has given me a greater appreciation of tone, articulation, and melodic phrasing. ...


3

The first thing to emphasise is that "professional" and "highly skilled" do not necessarily go hand in hand. The Sex Pistols were professional musicians, but you wouldn't use them as examples of how to play their instruments well! It's also important to emphasise that expecting to become a professional musician when you're just starting is wildly over-...


2

Don't construct excuses. With the possible exception of some atheletic pursuits, where over-development of one set of muscles might hinder other requirements - a body-builder is probably not suited to the pole-vault for instance - getting good at one thing is very unlikely to prevent you from getting good at another. Of course, if you're aiming for ...


2

To add to other answers: Yes. Here's why: Learning multiple instruments multiplies synaptic connections. The more resources your brain has for learning stuff, the more comprehensively it will understand that thing. After learning 3-4 woodwind instruments, you realize that the process by which they produce and execute sound is basically all the same. The ...


2

I would just add to the above answers that there are some purely physical skills that do transfer- to some extent. For instance, dexterity of fingers and precise timing of their motions to the music is necessary for just about all instruments, and getting your fingers in shape will help for all. Learning fingerings for wind instruments, although they ...


2

I think I am getting a better idea of what you want to do following your comments! It would be a good idea to make sure that the drum machine that you choose has good playable pads - a lot of people only use the pads on drum machines to sequence things in step time or play simple parts that are then quantised later, so the pads aren't always that good. You ...


2

You mentioned two goals in your question. You want to enhance your understanding of music theory but also wonder which of two instruments are easier to play. I think the other answers have adequately addressed the differences between an accordion and a piano in terms of playability and how they relate to music theory. And you did not really ask about ...


2

Most brass band players I know can play more than one instrument: after all, this is the main point of the "instruments in different keys" system for three-valved instruments. That said, when a player ends up playing different instruments in different bands (so they have to switch over the course of each week), they usually find that a little uncomfortable ...


2

I am currently trying to double high and low brass. My trumpet playing isn't great yet, but T-bone is unaffected. No problem. I've been playing T-bone for years and marched the previous season. My band no longer marches T-bone, sad, but I though why not learn high brass? So I'm learning mellophone and trumpet. It is exactly like piano and organ or piano and ...


2

There is one part of your question that I am qualified to answer, and that is the part about requiring different drivers for each keyboard. This would not be the case unless the keyboard in question was being plugged directly in to your Mac via USB. If you add a MIDI interface to your setup, then you only need drivers for this interface, and you will take ...


1

The hard part is when either vocal or guitar are in different rhythms. I would start with songs where the guitar and vocal are rhythmically identical. So with each strum you sing a new word. From there proceed to only slightly more complex vocals. And for practice you don't even need words... just start strumming anything slowly, and then sing "La" with ...


1

Definitely. There are lots of people who play all of the woodwinds (maybe not bassoon) very well; modern musicals almost exclusively call for this kind of doubling. In fact, it's kind of unusual to find professional saxophonists or clarinetists that aren't at least competent at the other, though admittedly those instruments are remarkably similar. And it'...


1

For most songs, I'm perfectly capable of playing and singing at the same time. But there are some songs where the guitar rhythm and vocal rhythm don't correlate clearly. To me AC/DC's Back in Black is one such song. Now, I've been singing or playing this song countless of times for years. I know the song inside out but I never managed to do both at the same ...


1

If you get distracted by the lyrics' meaning, try singing nonsense words that fit the stress pattern of the real words.


1

Completely disregarding the issue of the written music (which others have answered well), my experience as a trumpeter has been that the embouchure is the bigger problem. I had no problem adjusting to playing the Eb horn after only a few hours of practice. The bigger embouchure used means that I surely didn't get as fine a tone as an experienced players, ...


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