14

You're right. There's no effect when transposing by a perfect unison. But it does make sense to have the option of transposing by an augmented unison (eg. Ab major to A Major) or a diminished unison (eg. B major to Bb Major). I guess the perfect unison option is simply there because you have perfect, diminished and augmented transpose options for each ...


14

You can do this two ways. Do the first. It really is clearer. (How many verses are you going to make the singer(s) perform without a few bars rest though?)


12

We call this “cross-staff notation” if this helps you in future searches. The steps: Write all necessary pitches in one staff. In your case, write all upstem notes in the upper staff. Now select the note that needs to be moved. Then hit Ctrl-Shift-Direction (on Mac it's Command-Shift-Direction), where “Direction” is the up or down arrow depending on where ...


10

MuseScore certainly lets you enter notes and chords then hear what they sound like. I'd warn you, however, that studying music theory divorced from practical experience of PLAYING the sort of music being studied is going to lead you into a web of miscomprehensions and dead ends. Take lessons on playing an instrument. PLAY music. Let the theory follow.


9

You could try something like this, using just repeat signs and volta brackets: |-1.,3.-|-2.,4.-| || intro ||: A | B :|| C :|| outro ||


8

Some of it appears to be a variation of shape notes (5,8,9,10,11,12), others seem based on larger note values that are quite rare in modern music and clef like (6,14). Some (mainly the Xs and triangles) seem based on percussion notation (2,7,8) and some just seem to be decorations (1,3,4,13). As these notes heads come from different places and are used in ...


7

Here are some of example of where alternate note heads are useful. There are probably more that I can't think of, or am unaware of. The "ladder" shape is one form of the double-whole note (aka breve). As you might expect, it has twice the duration of a regular whole note. Notation for percussion instruments oftens use various shapes to indicate different ...


6

I think you should definitely find some way to specify it, just so the performer knows exactly what is expected. Here are a few possible solutions, though I don't claim any of them are 100% factually correct with sources to back me up: I've seen editorial footnotes in scores of composers before Bach. If you think a footnote is the best bet, I don't ...


6

It depends. One of the best pieces of advice for writing music in Musescore or any other score editor is to compose with pencil and paper first, sitting at the piano if you have one. Computers are great tools for typesetting music, but don't always help with the actual process of composing. As Brian says, playback is a nice sanity check but if you rely on ...


6

Not sure if this isn't some kind of prank ;). Musescore's playback system is fine, the note is actually a G. However, the note symbol itself is offset by -0.5sp up and to the left, as visible in the inspector when you select the note, in the accord section. Thus it appears in the place you would expect an A♭. The Accord offset is normally used to make ...


5

Musescore should automatically adjust the positions of notes to fit the lyrics. If it is not, then you may have a setting somewhere that is locking down the positions of the notes and preventing them from moving automatically. Also be aware that if you see a little angled arrow symbol at the end of a line, that means Musescore won't move a measure to the ...


5

Right-click on the instrument name and click Staff Properties. Type whatever you want under Long Instrument Name and Short Instrument Name to change what is displayed in each context. More information is available on the MuseScore documentation Staff Properties page.


5

As you say, this is correct behaviour. If you don't want a literal copy of the music, after the Copy/Paste leave the notes selected and call the Transpose function. It will take just a couple of clicks to shift down an octave.


4

No, you don't want the mixer (F10). You want the master volume. This is found in the play panel (F11). This automatically saves your setting so that you don't have to adjust it every time. You can also find a master volume slider in the Synthesizer panel (Display > Synthesizer). The other option is to adjust the program's relative volume in Window's volume ...


4

As you pointed out, there are different ways to work with tabs in Musescore, which are listed here. The one you are trying to implement is this one: It seems that you are using an older version of Musescore (1.x), in which the tab feature is not available. I'm on 2.0.1 and can see the advanced style properties menu:


4

A pragmatic answer: if there is a way to notate that repeats are to be played on D.C. or D.S., it is not well known. I'm not saying there is no such standard, only that it is not widespread. The best you can do is to write it out: "D.S. with repeats", or "D.S con repetizione" if you prefer italian.


4

It sounds like you are looking for a website that allows you to submit your work and combine with other people's work. I know of two websites that allow you to do so. CoCompose http://www.cocompose.com Here you have two options: Start a Project and set restrictions on the type of content by making a a) Private Project - Where you have to invite people ...


4

Following the hint in Dekkadeci's comment, if this excerpt is from a German publisher, Pw may mean Pedal wieder or Pedal wiederdrücken "pedal again (push)," meaning to momentarily release the pedal. The period after Pw, just like the one after P, suggests an abbreviation of a word. Pw is easier to typeset and easier to read than an asterisk crammed against ...


3

Quick answer - select the note, press Shift-V. I discovered this by calling up the Handbook from the Help menu in MuseScore, and entering 'accent' into the Search box. I think we can agree that an accent is unlikely to be represented by a fade-out! Though I agree that the handbook could have more helpfully said 'Accent (sforzato)' than 'Sforzato (accent)'...


3

These are found in the "Lines" palette (on the left side of the screen). You can use both text versions (dim.) or hairpins. See more here in MuseScore's online handbook.


3

Add any instrument, e.g. piano Right click the staff and change the instrument name to Seashore (optional, this is just for easy reading later) View - Mixer (or F10) - change the sound dropdown to Seashore


3

The post is quite old, but I will answer it anyway. Follow the post shown before by 'Awe', that is "Under the category "Plucked Strings" you have all available string instruments to choose from, both standard notation and tablature for each. " Now click on 'Add Linked Staff' rather than 'Add'. The new stave will now be linked to the first So if your ...


3

Because the Eb3 is in a second voice. In the handbook they explain how to use multiple voices in a staff: https://musescore.org/en/handbook/voices Now TBH, but I'm definitely no expert, I'd find it easier to read if the first Eb3 would be notated in the second voice too, since it alerts me something's coming up, and also since I won't need to hide the ...


3

Orchestras listen to each other, and (hopefully) play their dynamics in context of what's going on around them. Staves in a score editor program dont! Which is why we often have to be more meticulous when writing for MuseScore than when writing for the London Symphony Orchestra. Here's one MuseScore version of Beethoven 5 that's available online. ...


3

First, make sure your Musescore is up to date. If you place a fine in the score from the palette, it should stop playback there. Then you can make it invisible. And this seems easy once you read it: to skip over measures, place invisible D.C.s and segnos and/or to coda and coda marks. If it's not behaving as expected, check that Musescore is up to date ...


3

You're asking for 'cues'. See example below, borrowed from the Wikipedia item on that topic. You'll see that the main part retains its full notation, rests and all, the smaller cue notes are labelled with the name of the instrument that plays them. The more advanced notation programs (Sibelius, Finale) have a 'Paste as cue' function that automatically ...


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