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-3

Eminor, Aminor/E, Fsharpdiminished/A, B I am assuming i is Eminor. (I am absolutely sure.) I am assuming iv 4 is a misspelling of iv 6 4, so it is Aminor/E. I am assuming ii diminished 6 is Fsharpdiminished/A. I am assuming that the V/v (a little ambiguous) is a V (who doesn't like functional harmony?), so it is B.


0

Get rid of the negative connotations in 'disorganised' and the answer could be 'yes, sort of'. It's disorganised in the same sense that a narrative poem is disorganised compared to a verse - refrain structure. Is an opera disorganised because it doesn't end with a reprise of the material it opened with? Hopefully it's organised by a progressive storyline, ...


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As Guidot says: the individual stanzas of a poem continuously, without repetition "compose a song" Erlkönig is a good example, also the fuga (user 16935) fits fine!


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...often the first theme ends on a half cadence... I think you have mislabeled the cadence ending the first group of themes. It should be... ...where mm. 12-13 is a PAC in F. At that point there is an elision in m. 13 where the transitional phrase takes up a triplet figuration an modulates from F to C. It seems strange to select the transitional phrase ...


-1

You find a sonata (or sonatina) by a composer who wasn't very adventurous, and wrote music in nice textbook-like 4 8 and 16 bar phrases and sections. That mostly rules out the Haydn, Mozart or Beethoven, but there are plenty of lesser known ones (though bear in mind they are lesser known for a reason!) Michael Haydn, Leopold Mozart, Dittersdorf, Boccherini,...


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a) Strong melody helps people to recognize the chorus and remember the song for a longer time. It is also clear that if the melody is easy and the phrases repeated, it is even easier to remember (look up the chorus of The Calling - "Wherever You Will Go", the chorus repeats the same or almost same melody line many times and still the chord progression is the ...


1

Is a chorus (in the context of pop and rock) simply a) a strong melody combined with a strong progression? Or, is it b) a specific structural moment that has to be appreciated in the greater context of a song? A chorus in the context of pop and rock music is (usually) a refrain - or simply a section of the song that repeats. There is no right or wrong ...


3

...just a slight and arbitrary variation in harmony... Consider I | V... an opening gesture versus ...V | I a closing gesture. Flipping the order may seem a small change, but it's profoundly different in terms of phrasing. Notice that I put it a | for a barline to hint at the phrasing. If we had only ...I V I V I V I V... without barlines, no indication ...


1

Yes, it's common (but not required) for the chorus to have a quite different melody and chord sequence to the verse. And, of course, for the chorus to use the same lyrics each time while the various verses have different ones. The verses may be more adventurous in both words and music, we 'come home' to the chorus. There are techniques, common to all ...


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The sense of a chorus is that everybody can join the singing. The chord progression is less important than the melody: pick out a motif of the verse or splitting a phrase, repeat it by augmentation of the tension, using sequences, repetition, eventually using call and response.


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Here's one in C major, found here. Another popular example from classical music is the well-known theme found in the final movement of Symphony No. 1 by Brahms. Once again, the antecedent phrase begins on the tonic, which is C major, and ends on the dominant. This time, the consequent phrase not only has the same rhythm as its ...


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