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While I wouldn't call it a Rondo That Is Also A Theme And Variations at this point, you can easily write a rondo where every return of the A section is varied. The 4th movement of Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 3 in B Minor is one such example (heck, the first return of its A section is in E minor instead of B minor, and the movement has aspects of sonata-rondo ...


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A "theme and variations" is typically just that -- a theme, and then variations on that theme. If you have multiple other sections (B, C, bridge) that have no clear relationship as a variation on that theme, then it wouldn't typically be a theme and variations. That's not to say that modern "theme and variations" don't take more liberties with the form. ...


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@Caters First of all I would say that there is nothing which prevents a composer from using sonata form ideas in any composition whether it is a waltz or whatever it is. Afterall the sonata form in essence is a big ABA form, so any type of music that is essentially thought of as an ABA form could be evolved into a sonata form with two themes in the A part, ...


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It isn't a sonata. It fits easily into ternary form. The "A" section is the two themes in Eb and Ab. The middle "B" section is the part in Db. The demarcation of those sections is pretty obvious as they are indicated by the key signature changes for bars 69-188 for the "B" section. Merely repeating a theme is not a recapitulation. The basic idea of a ...


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The waltz is not in sonata form as commonly understood, nor even as it was extended greatly by romantic period composers. One of the few consistent features of sonata form is the return of the second theme in the tonic key in the recapitulation. (In the 20th century, this even became known as the "sonata principle" because it's the most characteristic ...


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A musical form is not a jelly-mould into which a composer pours some notes, and out comes a composition. If a piece by Chopin doesn't "fit" the jelly-mould described in a textbook, the most likely option is that the textbook is "wrong," not the Chopin was "wrong". This basic misconception seems to occur in many of the OP's posts, but arguing the specific ...


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" How is Chopin able to mesh together Sonata Form and the waltz so well?" The answer is probably simply "because he's a genius" A waltz was originally a piece for dancing and dancers have certain expectations of form. Chopin's waltzes are purely concert pieces and never intended for dancing, so he would not have felt constricted by the standard form. He ...


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