22

I think the answer boils down to what you mean by "knowing" the intervals. To do this [sing a tune back] you surely need to be able to know the intervals in the tune you have just heard and then replay it back with your voice. I don't think "knowing" these intervals in order to sing something back means you know if an interval is, e.g., a major or a ...


16

The term you are looking for is "Quality": The quality of a chord (triad) refers to whether it is major, minor, diminished, augmented, etc. I believe it can also be extended to 7th chords. In your specific example "GAB" is neither major nor minor. It might be considered a major-add-9 chord since there is a major third G-B and often the fifth is omitted in a ...


5

I'm going to take this one from the perspective of someone who's long earned a living by being able to sing well, yet has an abysmal pitch recollection without at least some cues to it… I suppose I also ought to mention that even though I've been doing this nearly 50 years now, I have no formal training to speak of. Part of singing a tune you already know ...


4

I think most religions have "ritual" music and in modern times this probably has evolved into something like gospel or what you are referring to. Some examples are: Jewish cantorial music. This can be very inspirational, very emotional. In modern synagogues such music will be played with a modern "folk music" style twist. There are also modern ...


4

Because our brains don't need to consciously be aware of intervals. Your question is the same as the following question: If I draw an X on the ground and ask someone to jump from where they're standing to the marked spot, and if they succeed at doing so, why are they not also able to tell me exactly what distance they've jumped? Or even more succinctly:...


4

Minor/major is used referring to intervals, scales and chords. Intervals can be big (major) or small (minor) in regards of their nr. of semitones. The chord quality or chord type of major/minor is characterized by the gender. German theorists use the term Tongeschlecht = tone gender: major/minor = dur/moll = male/female (-> dur = hard, moll = soft!) Edit: ...


3

"1st, 3rd and 5th degrees of the scale are relatively stable" That cannot refer to chords but individual notes or pitches, when there's an established tonic pitch in the listener's mind. The major chord built on the 5th scale degree is definitely not "stable" relative to the tonic, because that's the dominant chord. If your tonic is C, in C major, even if ...


3

Maybe the term you are looking for is body mapping? Body Mapping Body Mapping is the conscious correcting and refining of one’s body map to produce efficient, graceful, and coordinated movement. The body map is one’s self-representation in one’s own brain, one’s assumptions or conception of what one’s body is like, in whole or part. If our representation ...


3

What makes this song [sound] so Middle Eastern? The rhythm is one often used in Middle Eastern music. The instrumentation, consisting of percussion, and a chordophone such as an Oud, Sitar, guitar, etc. The harmonic progression, using Bmin, Amaj, Gmaj or Emin, and F#min or F#maj, is common in 20th Century Middle Eastern music. The articulation. In the first ...


3

Stack Exchange is not the place for this kind of questions. I request someone with enough reputation to vote this to be closed. Ask questions in StackExchange whose answers can not be found simply by Googling it up. A rather general question would do better than just posting a question and asking for solution. Your question's answer can simply be found by ...


3

It's a statistical coincidence. In cultures with twelve or fewer pitches per octave, there are only so many modes or maqamat or scales or ragas or pitch class sets or whatever. In this case, the maqamat and the European medieval modes are both old enough, and roughly contemporaneous (7th or 8th century), to make it historically dubious that an instance of ...


3

I'd look up under the doctrine of the affections in music. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctrine_of_the_affections Below you have the literature and bibliography of this theme. The book you are looking for could be the one cited of Mattheson or Mersenne. Mattheson: Capellmeister In der Capellmeister by Mattheson look for “Affecten” and “Modulation”. ...


3

For the most part, using chords shouldn't be about what sound you want, but what purpose the chord has, or where it lies in the key signature. For example, you would probably use a m7b5 or diminished triad as a leading tone chord if you wanted to as a dominant functioning chord, but you wouldn't just base a m7b5 or diminished chord on the fourth scale degree,...


2

There is only one way: learn existing songs and arrangements, see how they use chords in relation to melody and rhythm, and how it makes you feel. Theory might give you ideas about which aspects to pay attention to and how to organize it all in your mind, but ultimately it’s a matter of taste and you develop a taste by tasting lots of things.


2

A cursory look at the Wikipedia article for opus number gives me the impression that publishers generally trusted the opus numbers composers assigned to their own works, to the point where they did not further renumber by genre or piece type first. Notably, opus numbers are generally in ascending publication order, revealing insightful information a ...


2

You could reasonably call it either one, but I vote for passacaglia based on this: From "The Oxford Companion to Music", 2003, ed. Alison Latham, p. 932: In both French and German music the term [passacaglia] was often confounded with 'chaconne', in spite of attempts by several theorists ... to distinguish the two. In theory the passacaglia was in ...


1

This is purely anecdotal, so take it as such. I played single-reeds for many years, and when I switched to 'cello I was concerned exactly about this: that all of a sudden moving my hands far away from my head would produce higher, not lower pitches. As it turned out , again in my case, it was exactly zero problem at all. OTOH, if someone suddenly gave me an ...


1

Here is a VERY abridged list that I threw together for you of some tunes that are considered Cuban standards. They may not all be by Cuban composers. Some of the most famous boleros associated with Cuban singers are often written by Mexican composers like Armando Manzanero. Some of these tunes can be found in the “Latin Real Book” you mentioned and posted. I ...


1

Perhaps I'm getting your question wrong but: Think of it like being able to recognizing colors and knowing the names of said colors. You can know what yellow, red, blue feels like, and can discriminate between each other. If someone shows you a yellow sheet and tells you to choose the crayon that has the same color, you can grab the yellow crayon (you can ...


1

I often remember music accurately enough that I can play it back in my head, complete with instrumentation details. This means that, when I sing that song, I pitch-match my singing to the audio clip in my head. I don't necessarily pick up on the intervals I sing. (This leads to obvious trouble when I'm told to transpose any song that changes keys enough ...


1

I wondered the same thing! I still can't recognise isolated major thirds and minor thirds well, but I can sing them accurately. I don't know the answer for certain, but maybe these anecdotes can help get us closer to the answer. Singing intervals from song reference is easier because we are singing relative to a tonic. If the song is C major, singing a G -> ...


1

There are many things that we learn to do backwards. Personally, I learned to talk as a young child many years before I learned to spell the words I was speaking. Somehow we seem to be able to perform functions such as things we hear and see happening around us without knowing all the details. I can drive my car without knowing the mechanics involved. I can ...


1

My answer is that the solution is: re-formatting our "hard disk". You're correct saying that we have no problem to identify intervals referring to songs, but parallel we need to recognize the intervals by their character of perfect consonance, consonance and dissonance without referring to a song, or integrate both paths to one way of recognition and ...


1

Such numbering systems exist for many composers. Different scholars have created these catalogs, and so there are different organizational systems adopted. In my mind, certain prolific composers, such as Vivaldi, would benefit tremendously from a TWV-like catalogue. I'm not certain from the wording of your question -- are you aware of things like the ...


1

I'm not sure, whether I understand smooth correctly, but would like to add some remarks: In middle age and renaissance the instrumental spectrum was far wider, some of those can be certainly described as "less smooth". I vividly remember hearing a Wikipedia: Rauschpfeife, video at youtube, so I don't think this is mainly a geographic issue. Given that the ...


1

I'm gonna take a wild swing at this, with absolutely nothing to back me up but 'intuition'… bear with me. Engineering The West had the Industrial Revolution across the 18th century. Engineering became king. There was no problem that couldn't be solved by engineering, be it bridges, iron ships, spinning wheels & looms or… musical instruments. If ...


1

As requested collating into answer-form. Could fill out more interesting details of singer/composer in some cases if desired Arunachala Shiva Nighalo gheuna Bhaja Govindam Teertha Vitthala Sunta hai Guru Gyani ...


1

Given all the music theory treatises from the time period they were not just winging it and had a refined sense of technique. It may be helpful to read up on the church modes (as apposed to modes/scales as used in jazz and rock) to get a sense of how tonality was conceived back then. I'm still learning about Medieval music so I can't summarize much, but it ...


1

Some Eastern scales (by no means all of them - you can paint a horse to look like a cow, but not to look like a pigeon) can be approximated by scales formed from the 12 notes in an octave of Western music. The resemblance is about as accurate as Peter Sellers' 'Goodness Gracious Me' is an accurate depiction of a high-class Indian doctor. You can tell what ...


1

The English wikipedia has a reference to a printed book: Oktaven und Quinten translated by Paul Mast 1971


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