15

The brief answer is no, at least nothing like the modern sense. The more nuanced answer is sort of and sometimes. First, let's note that score format did exist historically early on. Almost all polyphonic Western music from its earliest forms (ca. late 8th or early 9th century) to the early 1200s was in score format. (See, for example, Notre Dame polyphony,...


13

This is a "down bow" symbol. It means that the note should be played by drawing the bow from the frog toward the tip. An "up bow" — drawing the bow from tip toward the frog — is a "V"-shaped symbol. IMAGES SOURCE: http://www.the-violin.com/up-and-down-bow


11

It's a printing error in the original. Similar dots appear here and here and the dot is missing from this treble-staff fermata However There is a different copy of the score in a YouTube video, and it does not have any of those defects. In particular, here's a screenshot of the measure where the left-side dot would ...


11

The English horn (in F) and the A clarinets have the expected transposed key signatures: concert B minor (two sharps) is written F♯ minor for the English horn (three sharps) and written D minor for the clarinets (one flat). The "B" instruments are B♭ instruments, denoted using the German system where B♭ is called "B" (B♮ is called "H&...


9

A Whole Bar rest which fills a bar in any (with a few extreme exceptions) time signature looks like a semibreve rest, but is centred in the bar. It's the standard notation. It is arguable that a dotted semibreve rest would also be OK for a complete bar of 3/2.. But that would be positioned at beat 1 position in the bar, not centrally. I guess there ...


9

The beam keeps the 4 notes/or rest together = 1 beat. This assembling makes it immediately plausible for reading. Thus the red version is much better and more usual.


8

According to the Illinois State University Big Red Marching Maching Drumline 2017 Music Notation Guide, it should look just as described: two adjacent note heads on either side of a single stem. The double stop is also called a flat flam or a French flam. With regard to the latter, Gary D. Cook's Teaching Percussion, page 63 indicates "in some ...


8

Since slashes are a more recent addition to the world of music notation the conventions are a little less etched in stone. The main thing is to make sure what you write is logical and clear, which it is. If you want the soloist to start playing around beat 3 the second example is the way to go. I would also include a written instruction such as “solo ad lib” ...


7

It's a bit visually strange, but permissible. In general, the convention is to clearly delineate the half-measure in 4/2 (or 2n>0/X) time. But when the rhythm is straightforward, as it is here, using a whole-note can be easier to read.


6

There is not a specific worldwide and standard notation for this that can be recognized worldwide, but since there's no absolute notation standard for drums (unlike most of other instruments), you can do "whatever" you want, and use what is usually done for percussion: add a legend at the beginning of the piece (or in the preface); add a ...


6

The chords in question should be fully tied — no repeated notes. Although the notation is ambiguous, the music demands ties. The tied chords occur at the ends of musical gestures, and a repeated chord in the piano would interfere with the violin. The editor's reasoning for tie-ing only the top and bottom notes seems to have been (an attempt) to clarify them ...


6

The third option is best: re-notate the tremolo in each bar. Depending on how long the tremolo continues, a "repeat previous measure" sign could be used. The tremolo should be notated using the proper "full measure" note-type for the time signature. For example, using whole notes in a 2/4 bar would be incorrect. This is also demonstrated ...


6

The book you're using likely adheres to the convention the a whole rest (semibreve) alone in a measure always means to rest for the entire measure. In that context, a dotted whole rest is anachronistic. This is only true for rests. A dotted whole note would be required in the parallel scenario.


6

G.P. and a fermata have entirely different meanings. OnMusic Dictionary is wrong. G.P. (or the Italian "vuota") is a courtesy indication that nobody is playing. In the absence of any indication to the contrary the tempo continues. G.P. is mostly only marked in the orchestra parts, the conductor can see from the score that everybody has rests. A ...


4

I have always had the understanding that in the days before paper became affordable, composers probably used chalk boards or wax tablets to coordinate the different parts. I don't think there is any clear documentation of this anywhere, however. Once they could reasonably start sketching with paper and pencil, they probably did that too, but I do not know ...


4

EDIT: I was wrong. The best published examples do not support my previous answer (see below). In fact, it wouldn't even make sense if the rule were that an accidental applies to any note within the measure at the same vertical position, since a note could be on the same line or space but be a totally different letter name, if there were a clef change partway ...


4

That is the purpose of standard music notation. Chord symbols by themselves are directionless, as well as non-specific about the voicing of the chord (except for the lowest pitch). If you want the chords to be played in a particular way, there are three options. Write it out in standard notation. Make a recording for the performer to learn from. Create your ...


4

More and more, we see dots written out as such - with no easily seen demarcation of the middle of a bar in even numbered timing. As in 4/4, crotchet, minim, crotchet, instead of crotchet, crotchet tied to crotchet, crotchet. I guess when there is a complex rhythm, there's a need for that 'rule' to be in place, but in simplistic cases, as yours, there's ...


4

Just as inside a normal measure, within a tuplet any note or rest values that sum up to the length of the tuplet are permissible. Inside this triplet semiquaver group, it would be acceptable to use a quaver rest instead of two semiquaver rests. Best practice for notation would likely involve visually separating each of the three semiquaver notes within ...


4

I just found this in The Definitive Guide To Music Notation (2016) p.190, which is quite specific about a difference: As I imagined, working backwards from a multi-measure G.P. as logically indicating a precise total time, a G.P. with a single measure would also be one exactly measure. With reference to the Italian alternative, vuota, the Riccordi ...


4

Just to provide a visual example of what you're seeing in comments and Albrecht's answer: Having the three beams encompass the entire beat (and thus beaming over the rest itself) makes especially clear to the reader that this is all a single metrical unit. Otherwise, the reader may, however temporarily, question whether the lone thirty-second note at the ...


3

The phrase "sheet music" is fine for what you want. What you're calling "sheet music" is stave notation. The term "sheet music" encompasses tab as well as stave notation.


3

Just another copy of the score. It confirms that those dots are just "flyspecks" or something. (There's another tango called "Almagro" by Cipolla; they seem to have run out of names.) https://www.todotango.com/english/music/song/627/Almagro/


3

The rest that is used for a whole bar that rest is the semi-breve rest. The only exception to this rule is 4/2 time where a breve rest is used. A semi-breve is not a whole measure in 4/2, thus it is inadequate to show that the whole bar rests in that time signature. Just for interest sake, your first answer in the picture is wrong because you don't use one ...


2

Roman numerals i VII V VI are for analysis where the octave, direction, and melodic aspects don't make any difference. Pop/jazz symbols D#m C# A# B are basically for lead sheets or extra info above a song melody staff in songbooks are convenience in guitar tab. But a basic expectation is the player will ad lib from those chords. Those two things won't do ...


2

The most common way to indicate multiple repeats is to write Play X times at the beginning of the repeated part. "Times" is often abbreviated with a lower-case "x". For example: X: 1 T: Multiple repeats M: 4/4 K: none L: 1/4 [K: clef=perc stafflines=1] B B B B [|: "Play 3x"B B B B :|] NOTE: One needs to be clear on the ...


2

There is a convention that a semibreve rest can be (and often is) used for a whole bar's rest of any duration. So your extra dot was unnecessary.


2

The typical way to play this would be to alternate the upper two notes with the lower D. Here is one possibility. It could also be played faster, in the reverse order (lower note first), or with the two lower notes alternating with the top-most. A more typical notation would show the two parts of the tremolo separately.


2

There's no problem mixing slashes with notes in the same measure. And I've never seen a 'rule' that there should be. Perhaps you're mixing up slashes and Bar Repeat symbols? Write a rest where you want silence. Write notes or slashes where you want something played. So I think the second way best describes what you want here.


2

In company with my two comments, I'd suggest there is one typographical convention that can clearly convey an ongoing, progressive change: a series of dashes or underscores. This can help clarify intentions: Imagine, printing "cresc." in measure 5 and "dim." in measure 10. Should we continue growing louder and louder through those 5 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible