23

In my opinion you're correct. I haven't seen them like in your example yet, but for me this seems like a repeat sign. Usually they have a dot on each side and are often found in drum parts for example: They are called 'Simile marks' and can also have more than one slash. One slash would usually mean to repeat the previous measure, two slashes would usually ...


19

These are both shorthand notations that refer to music occurring simultaneously in other staves. The first notation (the slashes) simply tell the performer to "do exactly what the other violins (the staff above you) are doing." This is especially clear when you consider, for instance, the following two portions of the score: This is just a practical ...


13

This notation isn't in Gardner Read's "Music Notation," 2nd edition. But your guess is reasonable because each diagonal-line group is three bars long what precedes the diagonal lines is also three bars long no other meaning could be given to something that affects four different percussion instruments it is the multi-staff analogue to simile marks.


9

You could try something like this, using just repeat signs and volta brackets: |-1.,3.-|-2.,4.-| || intro ||: A | B :|| C :|| outro ||


8

Technically, yes. Extended chords are created by a process of stacking thirds, where you continue to add notes from the scale, proceeding in intervals of a third (of whatever flavour) to the highest note. A 13th chord, therefore, is a seven-note chord that theoretically contains all notes of the diatonic scale. In practice, however, most often used ...


8

It is the same as the "standard" notation for tenor voices, written using the G clef and sounding an octave lower than written. The vestige of a C clef on the 4th line (i.e. a "tenor clef") is an indication that this isn't a standard treble clef. The more common notation is a small 8 below the clef. Looking at the music in the score makes it clear that is ...


7

With chord symbols alone, no. Chord symbols are not designed to show exact voicings of chords. The most they can show is inversion which is denoted by a slash. Typically when voicings must be exact, a more detailed notation will be used like in sheet music or tablature.


6

I think it's clear from context that it means repeat the previous three bars. It's not quite standard notation. More the sort of thing a composer might use as an indication to his copyist, or a film composer to his orchestrator.


6

You know what 12/17 means: you play the note at the 12th fret and slide to the 17th fret. In this case both notes are important. But, when you see /17, this means that the first note is really not important. You slide into the note at the 17th fret, but the starting note is not emphasized; this is just an ornament or part of the way that the line is phrased....


5

...Is comparing the key signatures the only way to quickly find a relative chord? Not necessarily for relative chords. Relative chords are always a minor triad below a major triad with the root separated by a minor third. The example above shows relative chord pairs - C & Am, G & Em - we don't really need to know the keys that are indicated ...


4

At least in the US, this notation is very commonly used for counting rhythm. In fact, in my experience it's the most common method, but that's just based off of first-hand, anecdotal evidence. But although this notation for sixteenth notes is pretty standard, notation for other subdivisions varies much more. For triplets I've seen "one trip-let," "two la-li,...


3

I grabbed a file from imslp.org and found your measure. It is a simple mordent.


3

Choral music uses such a tie to a short note to mark where a word's final consonant is pronounced. Some call this a written release. Randall Thompson's scores are good examples of this. (Solo vocal music such as a Schubert song doesn't need this as much because it can't suffer from, say, thirty people raggedly pronouncing 't' like a misbehaving power tool....


3

The trends I've seen are that Baroque music usually does not change key signatures mid-piece despite modulating to various keys, while Romantic music often does change key signatures accordingly. For Classical-era music, sonata-allegros often do not involve any key signature changes despite key changes being crucially important to their structure (the most ...


3

"256th notes appear in Vivaldi: Concerto in C for ottavino, archi e cembalo, F. IV n. 5." -- Extremes of conventional music notation. A complete answer would be a histogram of note lengths counted from some corpus such as Yale's, which standardizes on the MIDI quarter note. As with word frequencies in a prose corpus, the histogram would likely have a long ...


2

You've gotten some great answers about the specific piece of music - I'll answer the more general question. Legato literally means "bound together" - the sounds are connected. Staccato literally means "detached" - there's a space between the sounds. So you can't have a phrase that is both staccato and legato. But the symbol we use for legato, the curved ...


2

I’ll try to answer this once more, but because many words used in the question are borrowed from different concepts than what is actually meant, we have to get some things straight first: Equivalent: (mathematical term) having the same outcome in some function https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equivalence_relation If A and B are equivalent, it doesn’t matter ...


2

And what does he mean by upper tetrachord being harmonised with I IIIn IV Vv? I know that the upper tetrachord consists of degrees V, VI, VII and I, but... I will switch to using a circumflex ^ for scale degree instead of Roman numerals. The upper tetrachord ascending is ^5 ^6 ^7 ^1, however Semlek apparently is not mentioning that a Phrygian cadence is a ...


2

They are not ties. They are slurs. It just means play then legato. Note that the bottom notes are also held longer, suggesting a melody in the bass.


2

As a really simplified state, the last number note needs to be there. And, since it's above 7, that needs to be there as well. So a 9th will have 7 and 9; an 11th will have 7 and 11, and a 13th will have 7 and 13. Those last three could also be regarded as 7 and 2, 7 and 4 and 7 and 6 - all happily adding to the appropriate numbers! Of couse, there's the ...


2

Sort of. We're all familiar with the 'pile of thirds' textbook examples. And a 13th MAY include the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th - but almost certainly not the 11th, unless it's sharpened. But see this quote from Piston. Particularly note his comment that a 13th may often usefully be seen as a suspension (whether resolved or not). And, if tempted to describe ...


2

As you've observed, the intonation of a recorder is highly sensitive to the pressure it's played at, i.e. to the dynamics. It should not be understood as a “keyed” instrument where the fingers just select from a discrete number of pitches and the mouth is only responsible for dynamics and phrasing, but rather as a “fretless” instrument where the fingers ...


2

The recorder has a very limited range of dynamics. If the instrument is very sharp, you are blowing too hard.


1

The only tie shown is between the two G note (3rd and 4th). The lines are slurs - phrasings. The bass clef has stems up and down to show that the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes are held longer than they would be with only up stems. It's written as a three part tune - treble clef os top, bass clef/stems up is middle, and bass clef stems down the lowest of the three. ...


1

I'll take a guess based on your explanations. I think that your comment is correct about h,m,n in that as a chord superscript, the author means the chord build on the Roman Numeraled degree using the h or m or n scale. (Any noun may be verbed.) Next guess with no evidence, Vv may be the II chord; the major chord (or seventh) build on scale degree 2 and ...


1

Check out the circle of fifths... study it, it will change your life. The inner ring are the relative minors of the outer ring. The major and minor chords within a key can be looked at and grouped “SHAPED” two different ways. C major for example Method 1: the major chords will be on each side. The relative minor is below either the remaining two minor ...


1

Comparing editions, we can see that one of them marks so-called "artificial harmonics" with the open-diamond mark. The other edition has "A3" there which presumably indicates the same pitch to be played (A three octaves up), and indirectly this requires artificial harmonic compared with the written note there. I don't recognize "Vi-" (and there's no ...


1

They're probably not rehearsal letters because those are helpful only when there's more than one performer, while this is a solo. In the half dozen editions and arrangements of Nel cor piu non mi sento that I found online, some modern, some ancient, none included such symbols. So these symbols are unlikely to be musically important. They may be peculiar ...


1

It's not recent, I'm in my 50's and when I started taking piano lessons (I still play!) that's how 16th notes were counted!


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