14

This is the sign for a ‘scoop’, indicating that you start singing a little lower than the target pitch (perhaps a semitone or two), and slide/‘reach’ up to it. In this case, all three affected parts will probably start around the same pitch as their previous note (which makes the tenor notation confusing, because it looks like it's sliding up from the bass ...


12

Grace notes are the proper way to do this. Including ties from each grace note to its corresponding main note indicates that each grace note should be held. The core of the answer can be found in What's the proper piano notation for adding one note at a time to a chord and holding all the notes?, but since this specific scenario isn't addressed there, the ...


10

The three eighth notes (not 16th notes) with the "3" above the beam are a "triplet": three notes in the space of one beat. There are exactly four beats in the measure. For instructions on how to enter triplets in Sibelius, see the Sibelius manual entry "Tuplets - how to create".


8

Wow, thanks for a well-documented and clear question! You calculated correctly that the example adds up to 2 beats. However, it normally wouldn't be as challenging as that example, since it breaks a convention of beaming: Beams are normally organized to avoid connecting across beats, making it easier to see beats as groups at a glance. What if you had this: ...


7

Whichever suits your taste. (And don't forget the option of the Melodic Minor scale.) It's a transformation more than a transposition. Do you like the astringent augmented 2nd interval between 6 and 7 of the Harmonic Minor? Or the smoother 'modal' feel of the Natural Minor? Do you want to keep the leading note, the 'sharpened' 7th, that's central to the ...


7

From the Music Publishers Association of the United States, Inc. pamphlet "Standard Music Notation Practice: Placement of Note Heads and Accidentals (e)." When an interval of a second is written with opposite stems, the stems must be in alignment. Therefore, the first version, with the soprano note on the left, is the correct way to notate a ...


7

Even in a Concert Pitch score, the instruments that are written an octave away from their sounding pitch continue to be so. The octave transposition of piccolo, double bass etc. don't count as 'transposing'. In this particular score, Romeo & Juliet, you're also seeing some peculiarly Russian conventions. Russian composers were strangely fond of alto ...


6

You can write it exactly as you've done it! Double accidentals in figured bass are rare, but they do happen; see Can we use double accidentals in figured bass? Another option would be to replace the "x3" with just a doublesharp. Since a lone accidental applies to the pitch a third above the bass, just putting a doublesharp by default applies to the ...


6

The square bracket [ indicating the stat of a beam group should be attached at the end of the first note in the group. So the part: . . . \bar "||" [ff8 \melisma ef df] . . . should be changed to: . . . \bar "||" ff8[ \melisma ef df] . . . Some of the f-flats are not all showing up with flat symbol because LilyPond thinks that you are ...


6

When just an occasional note is different, a bracketed cue-sized note may be sufficient (example A). In your case, however, I think there are enough differences to warrant an ossia stave (example B). Maybe even a full-sized one, if the two versions are of equal status. Either way, some explanatory text would be in order, to make it clear that the ossia ...


5

It's a sort of vocal glissando. The word is sung, with the last part of it sliding up from the first to the second note's pitch. Can be done best with vox or instruments which can slide or bend notes - violin, guitar and trombone spring to mind. (Infinite pitching).


5

Samuel Adler's – The Study of Orchestration describes this as a "Cutout Score", providing the example below [p. 761] :


5

You can change the time signature for that single bar. Something along these lines:


5

Instruments such as piccolo, contrabassoon, and contrabass, which sound in a different octave from the written octave, are generally not considered to be transposing instruments, because the music is written in the same key as it is played in. Alto clef is a different clef, not a transposition. Traditionally, trombones would be in an alto-tenor-bass trio, ...


4

Your first question is partially correctly answered. The only issue is that you should consider note values as relations to the reference meter, not only the beat. For instance, while technically a quaver is a quarter of a beat (in an x/4 meter where x is between 1 and 4), you also have to remember that there are meters that have different layouts; for ...


4

In written music there's a simple way to write some notes longer. It involves a dot after the note. Not to be confused with a dot above or below a note. That dot increases the note value by 50%. So, the minim you circled would normally be 2 beats long, but with the dot there, it's increased by 50% (another 1 beat), making it 3 beats long, thus filling the ...


4

You can create new patterns using Scheme: Creating new diagrams is possible, although this will require Scheme ability and may not be accessible to all users. The patterns for the diagrams are in ‘scm/define-woodwind-diagrams.scm’ and ‘scm/display-woodwind-diagrams.scm’. Source: https://lilypond.org/doc/v2.18/Documentation/source/Documentation/notation/...


4

Given the brevity of the melody and the fact that there are no other parts involved, the best way to write it would be as though it were two different songs. That affords the greatest visual clarity and eliminates any uncertainty over whether there are two parts to be sung together or perhaps a main melody and a secondary melody (as opposed to two equal ...


3

It means the quarter note of the previous tempo is equal to the half note of the new tempo. Since the quarter note nominally is half of a half note, the new tempo is twice as fast. For example, if the previous tempo had 80 quarter notes a minute, the new tempo will have 80 half notes a minute. Because that means 160 quarter notes a minute, it's nominally ...


3

Different piece names for each score \Score blocks can have their own \header block. Remove piece = from the outer header block, and add a header block at the beginning of each \score: \header { piece = "Appropriate Title" } Removing lyrics, but retaining note alignment To remove the lyrics from the alternate melody, add \layout { \hide LyricText ...


2

Taking a cue from this answer on the lilypond-user listserv, how about this? \version "2.20.0" #(define-markup-command (forceLeft layout props content) (markup?) (interpret-markup layout props #{ \markup \fill-line { #content \null } #} )) \header { copyright = \markup \forceLeft "Left-aligned copyright" ...


2

You could make an argument for G9 or Dm/G. The main argument for Dm/G is that's, literally what's happening, you have triads moving in parallel over a bass line. The main argument against would be that the bass isn't exactly independent in a voice-leading sense, it mostly follows the chord roots in parallel octaves, and moves to this one breakaway in similar ...


2

The benefit of the "letter name" system is that it's easy to relate pitch-classes across octaves. The difficulty, as you point out, is that the naming is fixed and has no relationship to the key. As Tim suggests, moveable do solfege lets you modulate at will while still recognizing the unchanged structure of the melody. Yes, there are modifiers for ...


2

Since the clarifications in the comments, I should point out that as far as I can tell, the ideal solution isn't possible in Guitar Pro. If all that matters is the audio playback, then whatever gets the right result is fine. But ideally, you'd be able to insert a repeat "inside" a measure. You don't want to wind up with a measure of four beats plus ...


2

Like Tim says: this is a notation symbol for glissando applied for singers: let your voice glide like a Trombone: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/glissando-singing-lesson/


2

Hmm. As I mentioned in the comments, your answer looks perfectly correct to me: I could potentially imagine someone suggesting you break the initial quarter rest into two eighth notes, but in my experience this is unnecessary and too cluttered: The only other possibility I can imagine for 6/8 is if they are requesting vocal notation, where we typically don'...


2

Natural and harmonic minor refer to scale patterns occurring in a minor key; they are not keys in themselves. These describe how some scale steps are mutated (or not) in various contexts. To change from major to minor, the simplest thing is just to change chords I, IV, and V to i, iv, and v or V (depending; to be addressed below). There are a few minor (hah!)...


2

D#FxA# is the triad of D# in rootposition (neither the 3rd augmentation has to be indicated nor the double sharp of the 5th needs an asignment. This means if there stands a D# as a root note the other intervals (3rd and 5th) will be played as Fx and A#, referring to their function as major 3rd and perfect 5th. (2. chord: In my opinion C#m implies a G# as a ...


2

Wikipedia indicates that the baritone clef was used in French harpsichord music, and points to the Bauyn manuscript. The image below is from the first piece in the manuscript, found at the linked example, "Allemande de M. Chambonnières" m. 1. Regarding the mezzo-soprano clef, Wikipedia's commentary: the mezzo-soprano clef, rarely used in modern ...


1

In SATB voice parts, your S and A voices are written correctly. T should be in the lower stave, with stalks up. B is good. If writing for keyboard, I’d write all the RH notes as block chords. Only use extra ‘voices’ where polyphony demands it. (‘Which of these’? I only see one example.) Later: OK, I see you've clarified your question in an edit. As far ...


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