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29

It would be more accurate to say that cut time "will sound twice as fast as the same notes played in 4/4 at the same tempo". That's essentially what they're trying to get across. But even that wouldn't really be accurate. Cut time is a duple meter, 4/4 is a quadruple meter. The difference is subtle, but it's still a difference.


24

The symbol indicates the chord should be played as a descending arpeggio. Standard convention is to go from low to high, so when the composer wants to go the opposite way, it needs to be clarified.


20

That sentence "Played twice as fast as written" indicates that someone must have a misunderstanding. Someone who probably thinks that quarter notes are supposed to be played at a certain speed. That person would need more knowledge and experience with both tempo markings and different kinds of time signatures. I suppose you could say that in the beginning ...


15

The notes happen simultaneously, but it’s notated this way to indicate that two independent lines are happening. The A E F G moving line should sound distinct from the octave-doubled line. This will be subtle, but there are ways to have more or less weight in some fingers in order to get enough dynamic difference to distinguish the two voices. I’m guessing ...


12

I just googled Sprechstimme According to Encyclopaedia Britannica it's a cross between speaking and singing in which the tone quality of speech is heightened and lowered in pitch along melodic contours indicated in the musical notation. Its introduction is especially associated with the composer Arnold Schoenberg, who first used it in his Pierrot Lunaire (...


8

In English, it's called closed score. Open score means one instrument or voice per staff, as with most SATB choral music. Open score is easier to analyze, but often harder to sight-read because the shape of the fingering hand (guitar) or each hand (piano) isn't immediately visible on the page. Open score also occupies more space on the page, so it ...


7

They are played together. Reason for different stems is to differentiate the different voices, sort of alto here, and to emphasise the octaves in the lower part of the treble clef. All on one stem would look crowded and not easy to read.


7

It may be that the e-book used the same notation example written in 4/4 earlier, and is indicating to play this version faster? You are correct that the time signature is not the indicator for tempo. There is an old tradition of using Alla Breve to indicate the piece is a faster tempo, but current practice is to use tempo markings. The cut time choice ...


6

Yes it works the same way for all the ledger lines as well. Here is a pic that helps you out: The notes move stepwise like they do on the main lines of the staff


6

The notation starting in the second measure, isn't a tie, but rather a slur. More specifically, it's a phrasing slur indicating to play everything within that slur as a continual line and within a single phrase. You only need to play that quarter-note A in the second measure for the duration of one beat. And your intuition regarding the brackets in the ...


6

The lower version is right, definitely. You write the pickup measure with the actual note durations, not like "read all staves and try to figure out if this is a pickup bar or not". Think about if those weren't a grand staff i.e. tied treble and bass staves, but a score with two separate instruments. Would it be OK to write a whole-bar rest for the second ...


5

Actual note duration for the rest. What should happen at the other end of the piece is a part bar containing the two 'missing' beats - often as rests - but increasingly forgotten, sadly. So if there is the remains of the bar at the end, it's best to use a two beat rest there, making a full bar rest at the beginning rather pointless. Having said that, I don'...


4

Regardless of the voices, the notes do not share stems because because the notes are different lengths (i.e. some are eighths and some are sixteenths) and they therefore can't share a stem. I have never seen a professionally arranged piece that doesn't do this--if you have different rhythms, the chords cannot share stems even if you play some of the notes ...


4

One other note: Sprechstimme (a style Schoenberg invented, and indicated with the crossed notes) is derived from the older technique of recitativo, a sort of half-singing half-speaking style used for conversations in opera (mostly when the composer didn't want to interrupt the music by switching to actual speaking). Sprechstimme is somewhat freer, and ...


4

No, it's not current... and it doesn't really make much sense. (How fast is it "written"?) Your assertion that time signatures do not dictate tempo is correct. Certain meters might imply faster tempi (6/4 is probably going to be used for slower pieces, and 12/16 is usually seen in fast pieces like gigues) but those are general usages, not requirements.


4

Here are two pictures that show you the notes and fingering for the Bansuri. The first one is probably better for you, to understand it clearly and easy the first time you play. After that, I like the second one probably more, because it's simple and handy. In the second picture you should just write the western notes besides the original notes to make it ...


4

In a simple sense, it is correct. "Whatever tempo you have in mind, this is twice as fast as that". This works on the assumption that most people are used to the quarter note being the beat, which happens to be true. But it basically means that the pulse of the song will be on the half-notes. If someone was standing there waving a baton in front of you, ...


3

No advantages for guitarists. They are used to reading everything on the treble clef, even though they play an octave lower than written. If they had to read bass clef as well, te notes would only go as low as the third space up, so there's no advantage.


3

It's more unusual to use beams in this way in modern music, but it was very common in when Benda was writing. The rhythm itself is so simple it hardly needs any notation. You can't get much simpler than 16 equal length notes in a bar! So you might as well use the beams to show something else - and in the 18th century "something else" was either which hand ...


3

It's unusual to use beaming for fingering groups rather than rhythmical groups, but by no means wrong. Once you've decided to use stem direction to express hand assignment, you're pretty much forced to write counter-rhythmical beams; the alternative would be to write half the notes with flags rather than beams, which looks even worse.


3

Finding the edition the OP referred to (https://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ImagefromIndex/11070/torat) didn't take long. It's the sort of marking that always reminds me of a John Cleese joke in Fawlty Towers: "You should be on Mastermind. Specialist subject, the bleedin' obvious." Looking through the editors of editions on IMSPL to find somebody full of their ...


3

We call this an anacrusis; less formally, we just call it a "pick up." In short, a pick-up measure is one that takes place at the beginning of a work/section and is not the full value of the normal measure. We tend to treat them as "measure 0" and begin counting with measure 1 on the next downbeat. I haven't used Sibelius in a while, but somewhere in your ...


3

You would notate the exact voicing of a chord (open or closed) by writing it out note by note. Chord symbols were not designed to show the exact voicings only give a general sense of what the harmony is. The bass note is the only exact voicing that is notate and this is because the bass note greatly defines the overall harmony. Think of it as short hand ...


2

"Finger a C, hear the key." This is the phrase I learned to help keep the transposition straight, and it works for all transposing instruments, not just saxophones. This phrase will help keep you from transposing the wrong direct, but as badjohn pointed out, the octave transposition is something you will just have to learn. A variation that I have heard ...


2

I don't think that there is any very easy short cut. First you need to remember that saying an instrument is in Eb means that when it plays a written C, you get an Eb. It could have been done the other way: name the written note played to get C but it wasn't. Remember that bigger generally means lower, particularly for related instruments. Order the ...


2

Is it common to combine multiple voices in one piano staff... Yes, but stem directions should be used to indicate separate voices and rests should be used so that each voice has complete rhythm values for a measure. ...that might not even fit the time signature? If the rhythm values for a voice don't fit the measure, that's a notation error. I'll ...


2

I think it's rather more a 4/8 with triple subdivision than a 2/4 with sextuple subdivision, as seen for example in Prelude 13 of WTC I. Bach used it several times. There's a recording that appears to show that Buxtehude used it, though I couldn't find much more about this piece, let alone a score. There's also a web page mentioning Pachelbel's use of the ...


2

Don't think it makes much difference. It's actually where I prefer the snare to be - leaving the spaces for three toms and a kick drum. But more often, the 'x' is used for cymbals and hi-hat, even though the more important part is the stem and any tails indicating quavers/semis, etc.


2

The order just keeps continuing below and above the staff like on the staff itself, but have in mind that you shouldn't use too many ledger lines, because it can be hard to read for example a note that is 8 ledger lines above the staff... In this case you would write 8va or 8va to indicate that the notes are played an octave higher or lower than written. ...


2

Yes. Moving from a space to a line or a line to a space is one letter up or down. So the first line is an E. Right above it the space is an F. Next line up is a G. Going down from that first line (E) is a D. And then below that you need to add a little line called a ledger line and it would be middle C. Below that first ledger line would be a B and then if ...


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