40

I can't understand very well note duration notation. No wonder. The music you're trying to read is objectively incorrect in several ways. I won't list them all, but as you've noticed the vertical alignment is out of order. Furthermore, the rhythmic notation does not comply with the meter. Follow the advice in the comments to get a different copy. I ...


21

It stands for... M.M. Metronome Marking. Formerly "Mälzel Metronome." Named after the Inventor Johann Mälzel who is the person who first manufactured a metronome for widespread use (although he did was not the first person to invent such a device, that honor went to Dietrich Nikolaus Winkel).


20

By convention, a square fermata has a longer duration than a rounded fermata. It's not "upside down". Traditional notation convention usually tries to put the fermata over the note head, rather than the note stem. If the note is stemmed-down, them the fermata goes over the notehead, and the fermata dot will be below the fermata line. If the note ...


15

It is the same note, so no, not a hammer on or pull off. The tab should have a sheet explaining all the symbols they use (as there are variations) In the absence of other guidance I'd read it as simply holding the note, whereas the others may be staccato or shorter.


14

This writing is really very odd. But you can derive the correct rhythm if you imagine the eighth notes as off beat (counting “and”) ... there’s no logic in the notation of the half notes. Imagine you have a 4 voice part written on 4 different layers and channels. But it will still be difficult to derive a reasonable rhythm. It will be much easier to compare ...


8

The other answers already have good explanations of what this is. I would like to add that in order to understand this and other things you will encounter in the future you need more than someone telling you what to do in this particular instance. You need to learn to understand and read rhythmic notation. Tab notation sometimes includes rhythms, which are ...


8

Three grand staffs will be difficult to read in any circumstance. The best alternative depends on the specifics of the arrangement. Both hands use all three keyboards Then the best option is to use a standard grand staff with text indications. This is the best general solution, but there are other options that could be used, if desired, in specific ...


7

You only need one grand staff. The top staff is the right hand part, and the bottom staff is the left hand part. Clefs can be changed for either staff as needed, and instrument changes are indicated with plain text next to the staff. For clarity, you can mark instrument changes as "left hand- organ", for example.


6

The intro to this song plays the notes of a whole tone scale. The whole tone scale is used as a kind of cliché in theatre and film to represent imagination or dreaming/daydreaming. For example, Interestingly, the whole tone scale's modes are all also whole tone scales, so a cluster played in that way may not have any ...


5

I fully agree with all the comments remarking that the typesetting is a complete abomination here, however it does make “sense” in that the note values do express how long each note sounds on the guitar. Essentially, what happened here is that each string has its own voice, and the notes blend into each other. I give it five points for this detail attention.....


5

Usually, that is the way the same note is written, when both soprano and alto voices sing/play the same note. In other words, for the rest of that treble clef, there'd likely be two distinct lines, one with up stems, the other with downstems. Up for the soprano part, down for the alto. That's all assuming it's an A in the treble clef. Were it the bass clef, ...


5

To me both spellings would yield very similar results in most situations BUT the look of Bbmaj7/Cm is awkward because you have a more complex chord, a 7th, on top of a triad. A common way of voicing chords with a lot of tensions like a Cm13 is just what you wrote, Dm/Cm7, a triad containing the upper tensions on top of a basic left hand voicing, for example: ...


5

It's an ottava-line. Or shorter: an 8va line. It means you should play those notes one octave higher than notated. There's also an 8vb-line (ottava bassa) to play the notes an octave lower, which is drawn underneath the staff. And then there's the same for 2 octaves too: 15ma and 15mb Which stands for 'quindicessima' and 'quindicessima bassa' or a 15th up or ...


4

The U.S. Army band (see the "Percussion Clinic" download) indicates tambourine to be given with standard noteheads, which eliminates the problem described. Here is the one notation example that specifically includes a half-note: The Percussion II part for Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker also uses standard note heads for the tambourine. The below image is ...


3

My guess is that this is a reminder to mute the 6th or 5th string that would otherwise clash with the following chord. Guitarists often allow the low notes to sound, and note lengths are not always precisely marked in guitar scores. E.g. measure 18 starts with Am chord with A in bass voice on the 5th string, followed by E chord with E on the 6th string. Note ...


3

It can't be either. Hammer-ons move to a higher and pull-offs move to a lower note - generally on the same string. That note stays on the D (2nd string, 3rd fret) for the duration of one whole crotchet (beat, here), and is written as two quavers tied across the centre of the bar. Writing like that makes it easier to read, and the effect is pushing that note ...


3

Observe that there are two voices, one with stems up and one with stems down. This is common in classical guitar transcriptions (but poorly done in your version). When reading such a score, remember that the up-stem (treble) voice is independent of the down-stem (bass) voice. So the A in the second measure starts on the first beat of that measure.


3

I actually saw this just yesterday in scores written by Bruce Broughton (Silverado, JAG, Tombstone, Dallas, Hawaii Five-O). The way he wrote it was a note for the bulk of the duration tied to a shorter note with a staccato mark above it (first measure in the example below). X: 2 M: 4/4 K: C L: 1/4 |B2-.Bz|F2-!>!F-F|FGAB|e2d2|] Generally if you want to ...


3

Actually, you have more choices than that. A 13th represents a full cycle of notes-- a 15th would be back to the tonic. That means you could take ANY 3 consecutive notes in your chord and isolate them: Gmin / F7 (Or F7 / Gmin if you like) E♭Maj / dmin7 and so on. I think it's up to YOU how you want to spin this narrative. I would only spell it as a ...


3

This is going to be very subjective :) To answer the second part of your question first - An F/EbM7 would imply an Eb on the bass, which does not reflect the intended Cm13. So in that way, the interpretation does matter. In terms of how to group the notes (i.e. where to put that Bb), I think the rest of it is up to harmonic function, and what might be ...


3

I come across this in practice/teaching material, where for example the Primo (student) is the same melody in both hands while the Secondo (teacher) is providing the harmony. There (although aimed at students, not performers) the convention seems to be to write both hands in full and note the octave shift with 8va alta/bassa, in some modern engravings on the ...


3

Voices The choice of what parts of the kit are given to which voice actually depends on the music. There are three standard choices for the voices: Linear, Cymbals & Drums, and Hands & Feet. (It is very unusual to see more than two voices.) A linear representation is where only one voice is used (with upward stems). This is best when only one ...


3

According to section 4.19 Annotations of the ABC Standard, you can place parentheses around a note with the following code: "<(" ">)" C For example, X:0 M:none K:none "<("">)"C2


2

What I'm curious about is that the sound being two octaves up means it should be notated (at least, with the notation I've most commonly seen albeit as a cellist) like this: At least, unless a chord is intended, which wouldn't make a lot of sense considering it would imply a fingered open C string. My opinion is subjective, since all we have to go on is ...


2

It's unusual, but it's possible. Here's an example of a slur between two notes of the same pitch in the Tenor part of Francis Poulenc's Gloria III:


2

In key Fmajor, the only diatonic chord out of the two is C7 - C dominant 7. Cmaj7 isn't there. It is in key C major, but that's not part of the question. Using RN, in key F, V (or V7) is C7 (C E G B♭), so Cmaj7 would not (in my experience), be a chord that would rear its head.


2

It appears that there is no definitively correct answer, with various sources indicating different approaches. So I submit the following argument for the use of accidentals for D Dorian, G mixolydian etc. as pure opinion with no claim to authority. The most important information to immediately glean from a key signature, it would seem to me, would be tonal ...


1

The question boils down to how can/should microtonal music be notated. "Microtonality" has come to broadly refer to any music that doesn't conform to 12-tone equal temperament. Microtonality includes a variety of just and meantone temperaments as well as equal temperaments with other than 12 pitches. Allowing one is going to score for a standard ...


1

Metronome Mark sounds reasonable!


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