21

Looks like bars 4 and 5 are missing the 8va sign applicable to the treble clef. Without it, both hands will be fighting for room.


21

I would like to add a detail to Richard's answer. The bars sometimes has a 3+2 rhythm and other times a 2+3 rhythm. You could notate the long held chords in synchronization with that. So when it is 3+2 the chords can be notated with a dotted halfnote tied to a halfnote, and when it is 2+3 a halfnote tied to a dotted halfnote. Try it out and decide whether ...


15

You're correct that a whole rest is used for this purpose, but I've never seen actual note values used in that way. The whole+quarter construct seems to me the smart way to go. This is especially important when multiple voices occupy a single staff; in such a case, using a whole note only would lead to certain confusion on the part of the performer as to ...


10

Use Parentheses? E♯ is the enharmonic equivalent of F♮ I've seen the following in scores but written on the staff instead of using letters: E♯ (F♮)


9

I think the equals sign actually works perfectly well for this purpose. For starters, "enharmonic" itself is really a short way to say "enharmonically equivalent", so from a language perspective, = makes a lot of sense. In any context where it is important to note that two things are enharmonically equivalent, it will be obvious that the normal distinctions ...


9

No, a pickup measure will not be counted as measure 1 in a score. Instead, the first full measure following the pickup will be labeled as measure 1. But it's not that this pickup will never be counted; traditionally, the last measure of a piece will have the duration of the pickup subtracted from its total duration. As such, the final measure will be ...


7

"S.H." stands for "sons harmoniques" (harmonic sounds). The circle above the note provides the same information. The harmonic is a popular effect in harp music. Although the octave harmonic is the most common harmonic in the harp repertoire, fifth, double octave and third harmonics can also be produced. On some strings, even more harmonics can be produced....


6

This is a specific kind of tremolo called a "measured tremolo." It means repeating the same note a steady, measured rate. When a quarter note has one slash through the stem, you play two equal notes in its place, so a quarter note with a slash means to play two eighth notes. When that stem has two slashes though the stem, you play four equal notes in its ...


6

Both notes are played together on beat 1. The composer is thinking in terms of two instruments. If there was e.g. a cello and a double bass, the cello could play the half-note A, the double bass the two quarter-note ones. On piano, FEEL that, but all you can actually do is play the A once. Don't over-think this! There are still only two beats in that ...


6

Yeah, they almost certainly meant to write this: X:1 L:1/16 M:4/4 K:G %%score T1 V:T1 clef=treble-8 % 1 [V:T1] (6f,g,a,b,cd z2 (3f,g,a, (6b,cdefg (6abc'f,g,a, But it got somehow clobbered up in the typesetting process.


4

In chanted music there are two notations for "notes held as long as you need to." One is to put vertical bars on either side of the whole note, as shown here https://hymnary.org/hymn/LH1941/page/32 Another is to use the double whole note as shown here http://llpb.us/psalmody.htm


4

Several mathematical symbols come to mind, as I don't think there is an official musical symbol. ≡ Triple bar means "identical to" ≈ Approximately means "almost equal to" ~ Tilde means "similar"


4

In Kostka and Payne, Tonal Harmony the equal sign is used... ...or... ...or...


4

On many instruments, slurs indicate a particular technique. For wind instruments, it means to play without tonguing. For orchestral strings, it means to play in one bow motion. In these cases, it's critically important for slurs to be in the right places. Outside of that, I think it's simply tradition to use a slur to visually group the grace note in with ...


4

Terminology-wise, for equally-divided octaves, there's, well... Equally-Divided Octave (wow, you theorists are great at naming things, huh). This generally will be used to describe alternate tuning stsyems like 17-EDO, where the octave is divided into 17 equally (logarithmically) spaced intervals. Another way that tuning systems will generally handle this ...


5

It's possible to just have Bb and Gb. Look at Bartok's Mikrokosmos for some examples. It may take some wrestling in your notation program (and may not be possible on free ones). However, this is likely to be distracting, and the best way is probably to use a standard key signature corresponding to the closest tonality and use lots of accidentals. What you'...


3

As far as I know, there is no sign. Why should there be? That statement and other similar ones aren't commonplace, and whenever there's a need to use it, simply write the fact down. There are, as Dom rightly states, many mathematical signs and symbols which actually mean completely different things musically. + and - and o come to mind. And = isn't going to ...


3

F# - Gb or F#/Gb (I know you use the slash to indicate a secondary dominant or any other degree of another degree). https://www.theorie-musik.de/grundlagen/enharmonische-verwechslung/ Edit: I agree that / is used to assign F/G = F chord above G. So how about back slash: F#\Gb After reading the other answers here I think a good and clear solution will be ...


3

Groups of measures that contain one idea are called a phrase. Phrases are often, but not always, four measures long. Phrases can be grouped together and simply be called "phrase groups" or they can follow a stricter form called periods if they contain certain cadence patterns. There are different types of periods, as well, depending on the melodic structure ...


3

No. Pickup measures by definition are partial measures and do not count as "bar no. 1" or the "first measure." However, if your "pickup" measure is actually a full measure with rests in the first beat(s) then yes, that would be the first full "measure" of the song. Don't forget to add the remaining beats of that pick-up measure to the end of your score. If ...


2

I agree with you. If the intention of the composer is the exact rhythm posted, don't use a tuplet. Write out the dotted eighths, so one can see how they line up against the beats. For additional comprehension, one could use both: I've definitely seen scores with the literal (in this case, dotted eighth) rhythm written on the staff, with tuplets stemmed ...


2

Looking at the whole piece, I'd say the the first 5 measures are a rather rhapsodic introduction to an otherwise fairly metrical main section and I think the slightly odd rhythmic notation helps to emphasise this. There isn't a 3rd or 4th beat in the measure, and I don't think that renotating in dotted eighth-notes would help much. Play the first two quarter-...


2

"Whole notes" are four beat notes, "whole" or expressing one whole measure if you are in a time signature whose "fractional expression" (reading a time signature like it was a regular fraction) equals one (four quarter notes or one whole note, hence the name). So, 4/4 time or 2/2 or but not 3/4 or 2/4 or 6/8 or 5/4. "Whole" is a little unfortunate. "...


2

As Peter explained, ties are not used in hand percussion. I agree with his suggestion to use the rest because it would be easier to sight-read for most performers. Also, your stem directions need to be adjusted if you're concerned about "correct" stems. Here's what that would look like: Note: StackX does not allow photos in comments, so that is why I posted ...


2

Here are three possibilities. I think I'd rather read B. The LH should really keep the same notation it's had from the beginning.


2

It's just a fingering. It shows you that you need to play C with the 3rd finger and thus Ab* with the 1st one. You'd also play the low F with your pinky (5th finger). It's quite common to include the fingerings in pieces; it's a way to help the player. Usually, you'd find the numbers on top of the note.From the link I'm providing below, you can see that: ...


2

God, is this a badly written bar. Since it's in 3/2, here is my take on it: Here are the 3/2: So that is one voice on the left hand (pretty clear) and the first voice of the right hand. This would be the second voice of the right hand, which lasts only 2/2, followed by a rest: These just seem to be grace notes not written as grace notes: I am saying ...


2

Why Gb? and not F#? If you have G-Dorian (1 flat) and construct a lead tone F# it will fit.


1

Ties are not usually used in percussion notation because they are considered unnecessary, since the player doesn't sustain the tones like wind or string players. There are a few exceptions to this rule, like piano and vibraphone, but generally percussion notation just needs to indicate the beginning the notes. So the second option is the better of those two,...


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