34

These are bars 10 and 11 from Chopin's first Prelude (a larger snippet from IMSLP): Different editions vary on exactly how they place the beams - the original screenshot seems quite poorly typeset. The time signature is 2/8; the initial three LH semiquavers form an unmarked triplet (tuplet markings are often omitted like this; the first bar has them ...


25

tl;dr When notes share the same stem, they also share the same duration. While there are rare cases of (wrongly) written notes that seem to share the same stem while they're not, it's not your case. Each note you see in that score shares the length of the note "above": a sixteenth, an eight and again a sixteenth, for both bars. Some insight on stem ...


17

In my view the F# is the way to go. First it limits the phrase to just one accidental instead of having to cancel the Gb immediately after playing it. Secondly, in context we have the key of C and a C chord where the G melody note is the 5th of the chord. This makes the spelling of F# even more logical as it is a chromatic lower neighboring tone in between ...


14

F# is the way to go. It leads away from and back to the G, and it's both visually more clear and emphasizes the momentary "key of G-ness" of those notes. It's also easier to read because it the note is literally lower on the staff and only one accidental is involved.


10

One possible solution could be based on this snippet for multiple tonguing. \version "2.20.0" tongue = #(define-music-function (parser location dots) (integer?) #{ \tweak stencil #(lambda (grob) (let ((stil (ly:script-interface::print grob))) (let loop ((count (1- dots)) (new-stil stil)) (if (> count 0) ...


8

The extra measure come from you specifying r1 in the left hand after the second cross staff c. You have an extra half note everything starting at this point is shifted. To get the cross-staff c and the rest you can simply create a new Voice in the left hand containing the rest. For the curved lines I’d suggest using tweaked Phrasing slurs, something like #(...


7

Others already listed these points of view in favor of F# Up/down notehead motion is clearly visible Only one accidental is needed for the bar Temporary "looks like key of G", so the F# is like the leading tone in G, or the third of a D major chord I'd like to add one more rule-of-thumb for deciding on what's the proper enharmonic spelling, and ...


6

There are lots of ways to customise the beaming in LilyPond: if you just want a manual beam — try [ & ] or \noBeam or maybe you want no beams at all — try \autoBeamOff perhaps there is something else you want your beams to do programatically — Have a look at the options on this page of the documentation: https://lilypond.org/doc/v2.23/Documentation/...


6

A very simple solution would be to just places some bold full-stops in a markup, and align if necessary: (to maintain the staccato effect in the midi file, sill use the normal staccato dot but \omit it) \repeat tremolo 4 { <g d'>8\omit-.-\markup{\hspace #-0.5 \bold"...."} }


6

I would notate the entire two beats as an Eb augmented chord. There is ample precedent for using enharmonically equivalent notation to improve readability, especially where double-accidentals are concerned. The chord functions as a pivot. Initially, I agree, it's B augmented, inheriting its root from the preceding chord. But it also functions to lead ...


5

Well, you can make the second version look like the first one. But I advocate for using \RemoveAllEmptyStaves, unless you really want to separate the introduction and the main part. Doing a break before the voice starts is not really nescessary, because even if the break is before the part you will just get a few rests in the voice. Manually specifying ...


5

What you are looking for is \change Staff. (See Changing staff manually) Basically you just tell LilyPond to \change Staff and give the name of the staff you want to change to, but first you need to give the staves names (such as "up" and "down"). You should get something like this: Code: \new PianoStaff << \new Staff = "up&...


5

I don't know how to make the staff-switch voice follower line to be curves, but I think I can answer some of your other questions: The rest in the second measure should stay in the treble clef, but go down a bit to accommodate the high note of the left-hand voice. This can be achieved by getting rid of the staff switches in the right hand and placing \once\...


5

The top bar would make sense in 6/8 but the engraver seems to have forgotten the time has changed to 2/4! (It's not unheard of to notate with some instruments in 6/8, some in 2/4, but you need to SAY you're doing it!) The bars with the triplet are sloppily written. The 3 should be further back, under the middle note of the 16th triplet. As written, it ...


5

The first piece that comes to mind is Johannes Ockeghem's missa prolationum. This piece is entirely written on mensural canons: different parts sing the same notes at different speeds. As the example in the Wikipedia article shows, the first Kyrie is a double mensural canon. There are two written parts, each of which is sung by two voices, the ratio of ...


4

Musicamante gave you the answer regarding rhythm, but you also added this question... ...I understand that this is a chord (any time two or notes are played together, it's a chord?) Many regard two tones as partial or incomplete chords. The common definition of a complete chord is three or more tones. But, in this particular case you really have the two ...


3

First point is that the guitar is actually producing sounds one octave lower than the dots on the G (treble) clef show. Using that clef, and standard tuning, there is only the need for three ledger lines ever to be used at the low end. The majority of 'trebly - type' instruments will use the treble clef, so it's the better known one for most potential ...


3

Note: I'm not an expert in ancient notation (and English is not my native language), so please forgive me for using wrong terms. What we're seeing here is not "really" a staff notation, but actually an ancestor that shared common aspects with tablature. Finger/fretted instruments used lines to indicate each string, and numbers placed on each line ...


2

As is, it's reasonably clear where the cello melody starts (less so where it ends), but there are some simple changes to you could make to further emphasize it. Reinforce the p marking for the non-melody parts. A p or (p) or sempre p at measure 140 and/or 141 would make absolutely clear the the mf part is the melody. Similarly, a dynamic marking at the ...


2

Welcome to the site! The next level? That could mean several things. One might be not relying on the words to songs as navigational aids.Eschew that and concentrate on writing out just the chord chart. Since a lot of songs are similar to poetry, they can be written out on separate lines, either 4 or 8 bars per line will do the job. Don't worry about words - ...


2

How do you notate a chord like G F A C E without using slash notation? G13sus? G13sus4? Either would work. "sus" is typically interpreted as sus4. Someone could interpret it as sus2. Someone else could add the fifth: D. But that's the fun with interpreting the chord symbols. G11sus or G11sus4 These two symbols don't make sense to me. "11&...


2

Following the comments and provided answer, I contacted the publisher with the findings. They agreed that a mistake was made on their part, when they transcribed the original material. The entire piece is intended to be in 6/8, but some instrument parts, specifically those with the triplets, were written in 2/4. They sent me a replacement page with the fixes,...


2

There is no real standard to beamed rests. The subdivision on the first could imply a bit of a 16th note beat, while the second one looks more like a 3/16th note beat, but that is just interpretation. In such situations I would recommomend (and this seems to be common practise) to beam the rest as if it was a note of the same length. In the first circled ...


2

This is Richard’s answer slightly simplified. I’m putting this here because how am I going to get this into a comment? Note that the (ly:stencil-aligned-to ... X CENTER) part is not really nescessary. \version "2.22.0" #(define (repeat-stencil n pad) (grob-transformer 'stencil (lambda (grob orig) (stack-stencils X RIGHT pad (make-...


1

A polyphonic passage can be coded in a number of different ways (see the documentation here). For this case, I'd suggest writing it like this: << {c1^1} \\ {r4 a4_3 a4 a4}>> | << {c1} \\ {r4 g4_4 g4 g4}>> | << {c1} \\ {r4 f,4_5 f4 f4}>> | c'2 c,2


1

Two things: First, get rid of unnescessary clef changes in the right hand, as these will increase the distance of the melody notes. And second make sure that the stem direction is consequent: Bass goes down, Top goes up and the melody always points towards the middle. Somewhat like this:


1

Have you considered explicitly keeping the melodic line in one hand (probably the left) and having the hands cross in mm. 143 & 145? This would emphasize the continuity of the repeated brass call-and-response chords as accompaniment as well as the continuity of the cello line. As you note, this movement is rather slow, so it shouldn't require ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible