9

If it was written in the same octave that it was played in, it would stray too often into the much lower parts of the grand stave. By keeping it where it is written, apart from the notes on the bottom and 5th string, most of its notes are happily placed within the treble clef, with only three ledger lines needed below that for the lowest notes. Putting the ...


5

I'm following up on @Tim's answer. I didn't use a comment because I wanted to show a picture and discuss it. As you can see, the notes that fit on a typical guitar fret-board fit nicely on the treble stave. There are roughly the same number of ledger lines above and below the stave. I personally have trouble with more than 3 ledger lines and in the picture ...


4

These are called duplets. They tell you to play two quavers (8th notes) in the time of three quavers. These are used in compound time-signatures (6/8, 9/8, 12/8, 6/4, 9/4 etc.) where each beat consists of three sub-beats (or sub-divisions). As these time-signatures group notes in threes, a duplet allows you to have two equal length notes in the time of this ...


2

The brackets should be interpreted only for the marked notes, i.e. they don't apply for the whole measure.


1

The l.h in bar 2 must persist at least into the next bar - the two '2' fingerings must refer to different hands! The brackets apply to just that note I think. There's certainly no convention of 'a bracket lasts for a bar, like an accidental'.


1

Suggestions regarding which fingers or which hand to use are just that - suggestions. A pianist should use whichever helps produce the desired sound. Try the various possibilities and see which works for you. In bar 6 you may even like to try using 2 and 3 for the bracketed notes and continuing the left hand for the next 3 notes before using the right thumb ...


1

Could that be another name for upper mordent? Or inverted mordent? In music, a mordent is an ornament indicating that the note is to be played with a single rapid alternation with the note above or below. (wikipedia). The precise meaning of mordent has changed over the years. In the Baroque period, a mordent was a lower mordent and an upper mordent was a ...


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