14

Where are the accents, and is this meant to be a polyrhythm? You have 16 actual notes in your sample notation. That would fit into 4/4 time with the groupings of three forming a polyrhythm. This kind of pattern comes up in rock music... ...something like this seems more common, but follows the same polyrhythm idea... ...actually, that's kind of a ragtime ...


14

You can notate the measure as (1-1/3)/4, but the better solution would be to notate the first measure as 12/8 and the second as 4/8. 12/8 is understood by convention as 4 groups of three eighth notes. Another option would be to triple the tempo and change the first measure into four measures of 3/4 and the second measure into a measure of 4/4 (or 3/4 and 1/4,...


3

First point is that the guitar is actually producing sounds one octave lower than the dots on the G (treble) clef show. Using that clef, and standard tuning, there is only the need for three ledger lines ever to be used at the low end. The majority of 'trebly - type' instruments will use the treble clef, so it's the better known one for most potential ...


3

Depending on what's happening in the first three beats of the bar, that notation could be perfectly acceptable as-is, with no rests. A single voice may be split across the staves like that to indicate which hand takes which notes; as a logical "single voice", it only needs rests marked if that single voice is silent for some duration. From Gould's ...


1

This is how you would notate this:


1

Yes. An accidental is taken at face value, regardless of the key signature. It isn't additive. If you see B♭ you play B♭, whatever the key signature.


1

A polyphonic passage can be coded in a number of different ways (see the documentation here). For this case, I'd suggest writing it like this: << {c1^1} \\ {r4 a4_3 a4 a4}>> | << {c1} \\ {r4 g4_4 g4 g4}>> | << {c1} \\ {r4 f,4_5 f4 f4}>> | c'2 c,2


1

While the existing answers are correct for modern music, there was a time before the invention of the natural sign in the middle of the seventeenth century, when music was less chromatic and harmonies rarely strayed very far from the tonic. In those days, the sharp sign was used to cancel the flat sign. An example may be found at the end of the first Kyrie ...


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