6

There's nothing wrong with what's in the picture. All major subdivisions are respected so one can play it at sight. The tied Cs make it clear that there is a note held from beat 2 to beat 3.


5

You can use a variation of this snippet and use a dynamics context to display the time signatures, like in the following example: \version "2.18.2" \score { << \new Dynamics { \time 2/4 s2 \time 3/4 s2. \time 4/4 s1 } \new Staff \relative c' { \key es \major \clef treble << { g'8[-3^\markup { \italic "sempre ...


4

As for the bar numbers moved below the score, there are two approaches. The first would be to just use \override BarNumber.direction = #DOWN to shift the standard bar numbers down. The second approach adds a centred bar number for each bar below the score. This second approach is best described in this snippet. For the first approach, you can use the ...


4

As you ask for singers and choirs it might depend of the ending consonant. Many amateur singers don't keep the whole note and give not the exact value. Normally it is up to the conductor to tell the members how long he wants the note exactly held. If you are conductor yourself I you can say the ending consonant has to be sung on the first eighth note. I ...


2

First example: I think it's fine as-is. It's an unusual thing to ask for, so writing it out explicitly is appropriate. You could split into two staves, and as someone else said it will reduce confusion to write (senza trem.) or (non trem.) on the non-tremolo part. If you leave it combined, I'm not sure about using 1/2 to indicate each split; I've used 1. and ...


2

When you mention Satie I think of his interest in Medieval music and then I think perhaps you could follow the conventions of modern notation for Medieval music. For the unmetered part: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mensurstrich For the accidentals: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_ficta#Modern_editions My understanding of musica ficta is that it was ...


2

I've edited again and added a critique near the bottom of this answer: I figured that since I wrote this comment as an answer that I would give an answer as well. As you have probably already seen from the many responses, there are seven pitches in the diatonic scale. This has historically led to the current way of writing music. For example, accidentals ...


2

Nowadays, choristers and other musicians, from almost any background, will be more comfortable with the beat, pulse, or tactus notated as a quarter note, than as a shorter or longer note. An example of this cultural norm is in the MIDI standard. Even someone familiar with the 19th century British "half note beat" tradition would be nonplussed by music ...


2

I fear the only thing you can try is to just use a pitched staff for the maracas. You can adjust the visibility of accidentals and the line count of the system with overrides. I am not fully sure, how your score will look in the end, but perhaps you could start like this: \version "2.18.2" startMaracas = { \stopStaff \override Staff.StaffSymbol.line-...


2

As I said in my comment: make the middle of the bar visible. But ths will be difficult in a 3/8 like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncopation


1

Playing muted strings is a percussive effect with lots of attack, hardly any sustain, and no clearly discernible pitch (in theory). A section of vocalists could achieve a similar effect by using: plosives (unpitched "T" or "P" sounds) grunting thumping their chests Be creative. That said, sometimes the muted string is really more of a really short ...


1

Muted notes in standard notation are marked by an x like this picture shows: Source: http://smartbassguitar.com/muting-bass-guitar/#.XaYg27LKGhB and the choir could sing/articulate these x notes by a toneless t- k The example would be interpreted: dum t-k dum t-k dum dum dum dum


1

Might I suggest that you are looking at this the wrong way? I don't think anyone writes music with "to best suit how conductors need to conduct" as a major consideration. Composers are more concerned with getting their ideas clearly down in the notation. Conducting music can be anything from simple to extremely complicated but that's why conductors study ...


1

This depends on the style of music you are writing, and the corresponding performance practices. I'm more familiar with instrumental music than vocal, but the same basic idea applies to both. If you write a phrase that is followed by a rest, performers will tend to make the last note shorter than its written duration, whether or not the there is a slur ...


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