New answers tagged

10

In this case the intent is clear. In one of the standard works on notation, "Behind Bars" by Elaine Gould, the author writes: The diamond remains hollow, regardless of its duration. Where the rhythm is not clear from its context, differentiate minims and crochets [half and quarter notes] by writing the rhythmic values as small notes in brackets ...


8

This notation suggests you use both hands. The engraver has shown this in at least two ways: By alternating stems-up notation versus stems-down, the suggestion is to play the stems-up notation with the right hand and the stems-down notation with the left. (Similarly, the higher quarter-note rests apply to the right hand, the lower ones to the left. Thus ...


3

This is almost exactly how it should be written. It will be clear to any pianist how to group it and which hand to play it with. If you want to be extra clear, you could mark it with "RH" for "Right hand". Here are the changes that should be made: Regarding the sixteenth rest, either: A. Remove it, or B. If the intention is that the ...


1

On many instruments, connected notes do not have to be attacked. On those instruments, a slur means to only attack the first note in the group. For example, on the flute, one would only tongue the first note in a slur. With instruments like piano, there are several possibilities: Phrasing. Legato not only means connected notes, but also notes diminishing in ...


0

Ives is the first obvious one - although relatively unknown at the time, so others came up with the same idea independently, rather than being influenced by him. However - you could include just about all African drumming - abeit not notated.


7

Legato as an articulation is needed, because it is not the default "goes without saying" articulation, at least not universally for all instruments and styles. And legato slurs are needed to show which notes should be played as a single phrase, which couldn't be done by writing a single word "legato" somewhere. If you listen to players ...


3

Probably more to do with phrasing. From beginning to end of a legato phrase, all the notes will be joined 'in one breath', but at some point, that phrase will end, and a new one start. Those end and start notes won't be legato. There are several stages between staccato and legato, so it's rarely one or the other.


2

Pedal points are usually on tonic or dominant notes, those being the strongest on any key. Usually they are the basis for the first harmony (chord), and will continue to sound through several other chords, usually dissonantly, finally resolving at the original chord. They can be any note at all - it doesn't even have to be a diatonic note. Any note can be ...


1

In addition to the existing answers, I would just add that in abcjs you can use !style=x! to change the note head. I normally create a shortcut, with k being the most similar to x. You can also use the chord marks to draw the notes together. In the header: U: k = !style=x! Usage in the body: kB, | [kB,C]4 |] results in X: 1 M: C U: k = !style=x! K: C kB, | [...


3

I think you're looking at a Polychord. One chord on top of another. Often both triads, but the system allows more complex chords. Sometimes a harmonic device all its own, sometimes a method of simplifying the notation of an extended chord. Stravinsky used them (though he was unlikely to have labelled them with chord symbols!) As did ALW in 'Phantom' (...


13

I've never seen this symbol before, but according to Dolmetsch, this triangle indicates: strongly accented then immediate diminuendo It's worth nothing that the example they give is also from Rossini, in his overture to Il signor Bruschino: And this discussion on a Finale forum indicates that Rossini makes triangles of many of his crescendo and ...


2

I agree with the given ideas adjusting by ear, chorus effect. But what is your goal? A demo tape? Midi sound cards will never compensate original sounds. Brass instruments in midi are horrible any way. If you want a proper recording of your piece let it play by a band.


8

I agree with Laurence suggestion to do it by ear. If you don't, you'll run in many kinds of trouble. I'll try to list them: 2 instruments sound 3 dB louder than one; 3 instruments sound 5 dB louder than one; 4 instruments sound 6 dB than one. So adjusting volume of the track by several dB might work... MIDI velocity values (which you can adjust e.g. using ...


10

Consider playing to make a score & playing to make it sound like a section two totally separate jobs. What most people try to do when generating large sections in Midi is they try to play it all at once like a pianist, or worse, they try to generate it from a score they clicked in with the mouse. This just never works, and you'll spend more time trying ...


13

Don't over-think this. Live players listen, adjust and balance. They don't interpret 'f' as a fixed dB level, 'p' as another. They make it work. A sequencer will only give you a very general idea of how live players will balance. Your practical experience of bands and knowledge of scoring practices are much more important.


2

In order to continue the pedal across the end of the line, leave a flat pedal line.1 To release the pedal at the end of the line, use a vertical release line.2 1 Stephen Heller, "The Avalanche", op. 45, no. 2, mm. 29-30b. Published in "Celebration Series: Piano Etudes, Level 4", 2015 edition, RCM Publishing, page 13. 2 Ibid., mm. 30-32a,...


1

Do you even need to use any pedal here? The left hand part moves by step and is pretty low, so pedaling through any two consecutive notes would sound really muddy. And even if you pedal each note separately it could sound too heavy, plus there would probably not be enough time to allow the reverb to fade away, and then it would clash with the next note.


4

They are played differently. With m4-5 there will be a clear audible gap and with m9-10 not. So I'd definitely go with m9-10.


2

The 9>10 seems more accurate, but any player who knows what he's doing will pedal properly anyhow, holding until the first note in the next bar and changing while that is held down. But pedalling those particular notes..?


1

Maybe this is just more noise, but I'm going to try to clear up some of the confusion, inadvertently raised by the other answers. So, first of all, let's separate this into 2 problems: what's the proper way notation wise? What's the proper way in musescore? ==Notation wise== There's 2 types of notation: using "Ped. *" using lines Some prefer ...


0

The two notations command two quite different things. 1. indicates an overall legato, with a pedal 'change' on the first note of each bar. Think a phrase mark over the entire passage. This is normal 'legato pedalling'. asks for a break at each barline. Think a separate phrase mark over each individual bar. Yes, a 'change' should be an upward V within ...


2

Many editors do not mark their emendations; often one must compare a given text with an "urtext" or "original edition" (not necessarily the same) or even a facsimile of the composer's notebook. In "good" editorial work, the editor's changes may be marked (an accidental enclosed in brackets rather than parentheses) or a dotted ...


0

Short answer: if you're just asking about chords, they're typically thought of as stacked thirds, which means you skip a letter for each note. So a chord starting on B will always contain some note named D and F (or D#, F#, etc.). (Assuming we're talking about standard triads in the European classical tradition here.)


1

Rather than asking "when is a note sharp or flat" the question is more like "how to choose between enharmonic equivalent choises?" For instance we are playing a B, is the third note of the chord a Eb or and D#? If we play Bm is the fifth a Gb or a F#? For that particular choice of enharmonic equivalents the thing to understand is those ...


0

You are dealing with the issue of enharmonic tones in the 12TET tuning system versus the standard naming convention in music. The Major scale in any key will have the following pattern of steps: (W - W - H) - W - (W - W - H) W = whole step, H = half step. There are 8 notes including the octave, 7 intervals. The parenthesis separate Tetrachords. The Maj ...


1

How about the „Bond chord progression“? Is there a music theory explanation behind what gives (recent) James Bond theme songs their tense, dramatic, dark mood? Nobody can forbid us to hear a 5th, and between the major 6th (dorian) a chromatically augmented 5th, if we only listen only to the leading voice. But our „ear“ is trained to hear a VI6 chord when we ...


1

D F A# would make it a minor chord with an augmented fifth. If one wants to make it clear that it's an augmented fifth, make it a 13th chord and employ the B natural (and the E natural) in your melody / solo. Such a minor 13 augmented chord would build up from D F A# C E B or {0, 3, 8, 10, 14, 21}. And here comes the interesting part: depending on the ...


1

The question starts with Dm Dm7+ F and for the other question it's apparently supposed to be going into F major. So, that's F: vi vi7+ I The alternative is Dm Bb9 F or F: vi IV9 I I think there are three strikes against the augmented minor chord idea: augmented minor D F A# is enharmonically D F Bb and while the augmented triad is relatively rare in tonal ...


1

I appreciate the answers and comments given, so far, and have learned from them. Thank you. According to my summary understanding, it seems that one argument says that “augmented minor” is not valid because that’s not how chords like this have ever been described in musical theory before, and in fact augmented chords are not built by raising the 5th, but ...


4

Note there is Ab in the key signature at the beginning of the measure. This means any A is Ab, lowered by half-tone. It's difficult to guess without context, but it seems the notation refers to regular and inverted intervals. So (assuming it's in treble clef) D4-Ab4 is diminished 5th Ab4-D5 is augmented 4th Ab4-B4 is augmented 2nd B4-Ab5 is diminished 7th


8

Ab to B natural is an Augmented second (A2), but if you inverse that interval, i.e. B natural to Ab it is a 7th diminished (d7). You can also see that in the first example where you have D to Ab (d5/A4). Where the interval between D and Ab is a diminished fifth (d5) and the inverted interval is Ab to D which is an augmented fourth (A4).


0

I personally have never seen a (no5) notation in any official charts in the last 50 years. I am not sure it's a new convention or just one I've missed. Or perhaps we don't use it on this side of the pond. In classical 4 voice homophonic harmony theory the 5 is considered optional. Depending on how the other notes are moving you can choose to use it or ...


0

Yes, Gmaj7(no5) or Gmaj7(omit5) is pretty standard. But there's a lot to music that can't be conveyed by a chord symbol. If you want to get specific, consider notation (or tab if you're a guitarist).


1

If I'm looking strictly from a jazz perspective, the above conversation seems right. However, once I get into pop / electronica / EDM...I'm working with sequencers, and there it makes a big difference whether you're holding down the key for the fifth of a chord or not. That said, standard music notation only covers 90% of what I've needed. I've had to ...


3

An augmented triad, by definition, is two major thirds. It's not that a particular note is changed, thus making the chord "augmented". The fact that the fifth is raised from a major chord is just a convenient way to introduce the chord when teaching. In standard theory, chords are defined as stacks of major and minor thirds; diminished and ...


3

If you simultaneously play the notes D, F and A, it very clearly sounds like a minor chord, D minor. If you play D, F and Bb, it sounds like a major chord, Bb major. Clearly like a sunny day, that's a major chord. If D is the lowest note, it's a first inversion Bb major. Calling it a minor chord would be very misleading. Well ok, how about D, F, A# ... but ...


0

The numbered notation system, or jiǎnpǔ, is a common music notation system in China; however, it is nearly unheard of (for piano music, at least) elsewhere. Standard piano music is always (or near always) written in western notation ("dots"). There is at least one music notation program that can convert between western notation and Jianpu. ...


0

This will get closed because transcription questions are off topic here but I had to give it a shot because it’s so interesting. This is what I hear: The overall feel starts like 12/8 but then breaks into groups of 2 and 3 in the two 10/8 bars. The subdivisions are above in parentheses. Tricky but very cool the way the subdivisions are reversed in bars 2 &...


2

This is a plain simple 4/4 rhythm with "3-on-4" patterns (sorry, I don't know if that's the correct name in English): Consider that you can also write it like this, which could probably better follow the "feeling" of the riff, but from the point of view of reading it would only make it unnecessarily confusing to a trained musician: Your ...


1

While it's common knowledge[citation needed] that until classic-age there were rare cases of dynamics differences between parts, that doesn't mean that they were not considered: they were just more simple and generic, usually based on the selection of the [orchestra] instrumentation for the specific section of the composition. In fact, those differences are ...


1

I disagree with Aaron's answer - only System 1 shows the correct approach if you want to sustain all notes in each measure. System 2 greatly risks the human player lifting the pedal early in the last beat (e.g. Beat 4.5) and therefore breaking sustain early. (Both systems are technically written incorrectly, as pedal lines should start and end with square, ...


3

For a human performer Both notations are acceptable and mean the same thing, even though they appear to indicate separate release points. In general, the pedal is "changed" (released and reapplied) at the beginning of the "next" measure. Releasing at the end of a measure leaves and audible gap in sound between that measure and the next. ...


2

A fermata tells the player they can hold the note as long as they feel is appropriate and not a specified length of time. If you want a note held a specific length you should notate it exactly. If you want a specific tempo you should notate it. You can place a fermata over all the notes of a measure, but you can't rely on them all being the same length. ...


5

The two tenuto notes constitute a separate "voice" from the sixteenth notes. It's as if two instruments are playing: the melody instrument plays the two dotted eighths; an accompaniment instrument plays the sixteenths. The tenuto notes are barred together for clarity that they are "connected". Tenuto means as you say: give each tenuto ...


2

Sliding the fingers is called 'portamento' and the notation looks like this: A glissando is similar but notated with a wavy line. The differences are discussed in this question: What is the difference between portamento and glissando? (the answer with the most upvotes is good, not the accepted one).


2

Two things: I would assume that if there were a switch from 3/4 to 6/8, the 8th note would be consistent, and the pulse duration would change, but if one were wise, you'd simply indicate that with a little parenthetical marking above that says (in symbols I can't make here) 8th note = 8th note. Best to err on the side of clarity and even redundancy. You ...


1

This is the rhythm of the intro:


4

The numbers are normally referred to the degree of the key in which it's tuned (usually, in C): 1 is the tonic (C), 2 the supertonic (D), etc. The dots indicate if the note is an octave above or below the reference. In the case above, assuming it's tuned in C, clockwise starting from the left most: 2: D 5: G 1̊ : C (octave above) 5̥ : G (octave below) 6: A ...


6

You have described precisely why the only sensible system is to label chords in relation to the MAJOR scale, no matter what mode the music may be using at any particular moment. If the tonic is A, Am triad is i, A major triad is I. G major is ♭VII, F major is ♭VI. But beware. A less robust and potentially confusing alternative system is sometimes used ...


5

The second octave you're referring to is probably the second of the instrument extension. Guitar is a transposing instrument, and its standard notation should use the "octave clef" (the one with the small 8 under it), meaning that the middle C on a guitar score actually sounds an octave lower. Note that in computer systems, the first index is 0, ...


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