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2

Solution #1 The issue for me is a visual one, and it comes down to the spacing: beat 2 is wider than the other beats, which among other things causes the final sixteenth rest to be too close to the following half rest. In the below example, I used MuseScore to recreate the problem measure — which resulted in much the same problem — and then shifted to the ...


1

To answer the last part of the question (though it's not actually needed here): the best way to input a bar with 'too many notes' in Dorico is to use hidden tuplets. That probably works for most other apps too.


1

Leaving aside the specific piece that prompted the question, the core of what's being asked is: How does RNA label out-of-key chords? There are three primary ways 1. Just add a sharp or flat before the Roman numeral Suppose we're in A minor and encounter a Bb major chord. This can be labeled bII ("flat two"). Similarly, in A major, and F major ...


6

This line helps the eye track the melody across different clefs, instruments, or voices. Here indicates the melody moving from the high voice in the bass clef to the low voice in the tenor clef. In piano scores, the marking is intended to guide phrasing. For example, this melody bit should probably be "brought out" - it is unlikely that the ...


10

The notation shown in the video — the standard tremolo notation — is the correct way to indicate a flutter. In can (should) be supplemented with "f.t" (flutter tongue) for clarity. As long as a note has no tremolo, it will be played normally. For an extended passage, you can write "flutter" at the beginning and either use a dotted line (...


3

Easiest way I can think of is to simply treat your instrumental break as the third verse. You could simply add "instrumental" underneath the lyrics for the second verse. Unless I am mistaken, the chords are the same. This is a simple solution, and it shows to the musicians that the form of the solo break is identical to the verse.


6

These numbers indicate what we call octave designation, which these authors discuss in their chapter on key/scale/modes (depending on what edition of the book you have, these chapters may be separated). With that said, the system they're using treats Middle C as C1. This means that Middle C is C1, the C an octave above that (the third space in treble clef) ...


5

Hypothetical Italian repeat markings answer: If and only if codas, segnos, etc. were the only tools at one's disposal, I would suggest D.C. al Coda ("Da Capo al Coda"; roughly "from the head (beginning) to the tail (ending)" in measure 17, which jumps the piece to the beginning. This could also be accomplished with "D.S. al Coda&...


10

You can use DS, DSS, coda, double coda but why? The song as is is only 27 bars. Eliminating a road map would add 16 bars (an extra verse and chorus if I’m reading it right) and avoid any possible confusion of missed signs, repeats or repeat endings. Write it out from top to bottom, you’re better off, especially if others will be sight reading the song. Plus, ...


3

You can notate it this way: Verse First ending, marked "to chorus" Jump over instrumental section Chorus, with D.C. Second verse Second ending leads into instrumental, then chorus End


1

Forzando fz and subito piano sp seem to be the two markings for what you describe, at least by definition. An isolated - "sudden" - loud or soft dynamic. But, I also seem to remember, from long ago, a teacher telling me to just use basic dynamic marks. So, something like setting mf at the beginning, then for the soft accents put p, then immediately ...


1

Technically, the difference between on- and before-the-beat graces is the slash through the stem, so I would print it without the slash. But this is abused or overlooked often enough in typesetting that I think adding the textual comment is wise; without it the performer might either unthinkingly play before the beat or conclude that there should have been a ...


-2

Umm... What about > over a note? A sudden decrescendo? EDIT: It's <>!!! Sources: Musescore3


5

In some performance scenarios, for example in a church or cathedral, the sound will echo around the building, dying away after the musicians have stopped playing. This could be an instruction from the composer to allow the sound to die away, with this sound being considered a part of the music.


4

It's the old notation for a normal sharp when double-sharps (as on the following note) are in the vicinity. Possibly the F in the preceding bar (which you have just avoided showing us!) was a double-sharp? In that case, the 'natural-sharp' notation, though not strictly necessary, could be a useful cautionary. The more modern style is just to write the ...


9

The natural is there as a cautionary - in the previous bar there may well have been an accidental for that same F note (guess it's treble clef), most likely an Fx, so it's just saying 'this F is an F♯ now'. Followed by an Fx (F double sharp, same pitch as G). It's just a reminder - you play that F as an F♯.


3

The double barline after bar 4 shows the end of the introduction, and the beginning of the theme.Lacking any 'backward' repeat sign (!!:) means go back to the very beginning. The way it's all written forms a big sandwich. Intro.4 bars.Theme.8 bars. Theme in another key.8 bars.(Repeat sign here):!! Intro.4 bars. Theme.8 bars. Theme in another key.8 bars. ...


4

As the other answers say, music should be repeated from the beginning. This is a simple arrangement of a melody by Prokofiev. It is preceded by 4 bars of chordal introduction. The double bar line separates the introduction from the main theme. The intention of the arranger is to repeat both the introduction and the theme. It might be a good idea to learn the ...


1

In the swing music I've heard that use 8th-note swing, 16th notes were always played exactly, in straight time. This means that the 16th-16th-8th patterns in the second measure of your "Swing Time Option #1" will be played exactly. With that being said, as far as I've heard, triplets in swing time are also played exactly. I'm afraid there's no ...


16

Double bar lines are used to mark beginnings and ends of sections but they are not the same as repeat signs. If there is no forward facing repeat sign then it repeats all the way to the beginning of the piece.


8

The repeat should go back to the beginning, actually. If the notation wanted to indicate going back to the double bar, they would have put an opening repeat barline. In the absence of such an opening repeat, the default is to return back to the beginning. Alternatively, one could notate this with a dal segno marking, putting it at that double barline if that'...


0

"Swing rhythm" indications near universally apply to eighth notes. In order to get the rhythm you want, in which the first two notes represent the first (longer) swing eighth, and the third note is the second (shorter) swing eighth, it should be written as sixteenth-eighth-sixteenth. That will be understood by jazz players and executed the way you ...


8

What you named "Swing time option 2" is the standard notation of swinged eight notes and triplets used in jazz scores. See e.g. this example of Dizzy Gillispie's Night in Tunisia: Note that the word "swing" is not even written in the score, as it is left to the musician's taste whether and how deeply swing the eight notes. Edit: It was ...


1

'Swing time #2' seems what you're trying to achieve. For the sake of argument, swing is roughly triplets, so the two quavers in bar 1 will behave like crotchet/quaver triplets, due to the legend 'swing', while the second bar will all be triplets, following exactly the same rhythmic pattern - be-it gentle or hard swing.If in fact you wanted exact triplets as ...


1

It depends on what you want. In both of your 'swing' examples, players will attempt to play the second bar more or less as written. More generally, swing usually only applies to eighth notes. Sixteenth and triplets are played as written.


4

This question veers into "Opinion-based" land, I fear. My gut response goes something like: For the paired eighth notes: If you write straight eighths but mark the music "In Swing Rhythm," Then the performers will know what to do and can adjust the magnitude of the swing (not necessarily an exact triplet). But if you write quarter + ...


3

The second C is C natural because there is nothing to indicate that it's anything else! C isn't mentioned in the key signature. The ♯ in the preceding bar only lasts as long as the next barline. So it's C natural. (C FLAT? Where did THAT idea come from?) Having said that, it would be normal practice to add cautionary accidentals, thus:


5

The standard I'm used to seeing is that, if there is a rest in one temporary voice (i.e. you're not writing a fugue or anything polyphonic, so you have no obligation to provide whole-bar rests for voices), you omit the rest for that measure and notate that measure as if that voice is missing. It doesn't matter if that rest occurs in the middle of a phrase.


38

It's not an ornament; it's a quarter rest. The Violins I are divided, and the upper half play rest + quarter note while the lower half play half notes.


2

Look carefully at the suggested fingerings. There's the clue. 5 1 4 1 means all played with l.h. (and pedalled), and 1 3 5 in the top bracket means use those fingers from r.h. That's the suggested fingerings, although some players may manage to roll the top five notes just with r.h. The second example is very similar, and would/could be played in the same ...


9

To understand the brackets, see What does the L-shaped symbol attached to C5 and G4 on the top staff mean?. In terms of execution of both cases, you'll play the bottom octave with your left hand, then jump to play the left-hand bracketed part (upside-down L) and right-hand bracketed part (right-side-up L) as a single arpeggio.


10

Yes, they're literally open-ended. This means you can't necessarily work backwards, as sometimes that can help, so makes the question a touch more difficult.


0

I discovered the tritone substitution this way: going from dominant to the tonic (B7 to E) play the V7-circle B7-E7-A7-D7-G7-C7-F7-E play chroV7 chromatic scale downward: B7-Bb7-A7-Ab7-G7-Gb7-F7-E r.hand. same as version 2 in r.h. and bass B-E-A-D-G-C-F->e this passage demonstrates that the chords are interchangeable, each second interval is a tritone ...


3

There does not seem to be a standard notation for spoons; however, spoons are related to castanets, and there are some examples of castanet notation, though also not standardized. Castanet notation #1 The book Castanets: Study of Rhythm Music, Book 1, by Emma Maleras, uses a two-line notation. The upper and lower lines denote left and right hands, ...


9

Yes, the ornament, known as a turn, is executed A-G-F#-G. For reassurance, of the editions on IMSLP that offer explicit notation (see below), all give A-G-F#-G explicitly. The Barry Cooper / ABRSM edition also gives the same notation. Casella von Bülow Schnabel


10

It's hard to imagine what else it could be other than tasto solo, considering that the edition with figures, published by Hummel, omits figures at this same point. Without access to the manuscript source, it's difficult to say more, but it seems likely that T. S. was added by whoever provided the figures for the Hummel edition, and that the other editions ...


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