21

It is hard to not touch other strings when you bend, especially if you bend wider than a semitone. The trick here is to mute strings that are not supposed to sound to eliminate unwanted noise instead of trying to not touch them. Some ways to do that are: Mute with the index finger of your fretting (left) hand and use middle and ring fingers to bend. Push ...


13

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


10

One thing that will help its to keep the nails on that hand very short, but the technique I use if I must bend a string into or through another is to tilt it back enough that only the fingertip touches the other string, keeping the nail back out of the way. This is relatively easy to practice and pick up.


6

Bending strings on a steel stringed acoustic guitar can be done to good effect. It works on a nylon stringed too, but is less common. You can try a lighter string gauge to make it easier. Especially steel stringed guitars are usually stringed with pretty brutal gauges. All major string manufacturers have lighter gauge acoustic strings. For nylon stringed ...


6

When you bend the G string, you are very slightly deforming the neck, and if you have a vibrato bridge or tailpiece you are most significantly pulling that out of its normal position. This is normal behavior for a guitar. If you want to have notes on one string stay in tune while you bend other strings, you can reduce the effect with any or all of the ...


5

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


5

Here's some philosophy on lip slurs. I haven't played this book in particular, but as a brass specialist I can talk about lip flexibility in general; it's the same thing. The ultimate goal of this is to have a clean transition between any two notes in different partials. This is the same whether you are trilling between two partials in a high register very ...


5

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


5

I googled "How to notate microtones" (I've been wondering too) and found this. It's on a flute website, but it should work for all musical purposes. http://www.flutecolors.com/techniques/microtones-quartertones/ Basically, there are certain accidentals that you can use for quarter tones and micro tones, which apparently does happen. Wikipedia also ...


5

There's two main ways of sliding up a note on the bagpipes. [Disclaimer: I play Flemish bagpipes rather than Great Highland Bagpipes, but I see no reason the same techniques shouldn't apply to both variants of the instrument.] The video doesn't show the player's fingers at the vital moment, but I would suspect that he does it by smoothly rolling the ...


5

The most straightforward way to play this would be to do a whole-tone bend on the B-string at the 16th fret, and then play the E-string at the same fret during the bend. You can use up to three fingers to do the bend, and the bending motion actually moves the fingers out of the way for your little finger to fret the E-string, so it's quite easy to play it ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the surface ...


4

I would not say that the first finger must be used to mute the lower strings but you can do so if you wish. There might be a particular circumstance (trying to achieve a certain effect perhaps) where muting the lower strings with your first finger might help. If you are picking only the string you are bending at the time the note is played - it is ...


4

If your next note is on a lower (i.e., thicker) string (what you call "the string above"), then you could use the same finger that you use for bending. This is done by letting the lower string slip under your finger while you bend, which will allow you to fret that new string by just rolling your finger a little bit. This is done a lot in blues playing, but ...


3

A few ideas... Pitch: Play the correct pitch with a non-bent 'reference' note and then compare your bent note to that. Do this over and over attempting to match the pitch as closely as possible. For the high E bend in the Sandman solo, if you have a 22 fret guitar you might need to hit a harmonic over the point where a 24th fret would be to get your ...


3

I'll repeat some of what I mentioned in the comments but I'll elaborate a bit as I have more space here. In my opinion this sounds more like a left hand issue. I do a lot more muting with my left hand, especially during single notes and bends, and only really use my right hand for keeping the lower strings from ringing when playing on the higher strings. ...


3

If you bend the thin E string, I can't see any other way than that the B and sometimes G string will also follow in the same movement. They are not making a sound since they are not touching the frets. So the tutorial videos are showing the correct way of doing it.


3

The fret hand can be very effective at muting the lower adjacent string, as well as all higher strings. For the lower string in your case, position your first (index) finger so that the tip of the finger is slightly touching the string you want to mute. In a good position, the tip of the finger should "butt up against" the string, not press it down. In ...


3

As suggested in your question a bend can be a quick bend and hold, a quick bend and release or a bend and gradual release. I have seen bend and release notated in different ways in various tabs I have come across. I think using an arrow to indicate the bend is the easiest way to clearly indicate how the relative timing of the bend and release. Below are ...


3

If you bend a string (up towards the ceiling/sky) the lower (sounding, i.e., thicker) strings are supposed to move under your finger(s). If your finger moved under the lower (sounding) strings then you would get a lot of undesired noise from those strings when you release the bend, and also when you do some vibrato while bending. In my experience, there are ...


3

Similar to Todd, for a large bend I'll use three fingers, and as they push the desired string, the natural rotation of them catches the next strings and moves them up away from frets. In this picture you can see my fingers have caught 2 strings out the way, and just moved them up enough that they don't play.


3

That is explained in the tab guide (section 3), but a negative hole number typically stands for a draw note, and each single-quote next to it means a half-step bend, so -4" would be draw 4, bent two half-steps... which is a broken notation because draw 4 doesn't go any lower than C# (Db) on a C harmonica. Btw, replacing -4'' by +4 sounds right. 4" looks ...


3

It sounds like you're asking about vibrato, not bends. Although vibrato does incorporate some bending. The first method you mention is the more common one for electric guitar use, where the string is pushed (and pulled) across the fretwire. This stretches and relaxes the string, so changing its pitch upwards. By as little or as much as the player wants. A ...


3

The usual tactic is to mute with either a handy spare finger on the left hand, or with one on your right hand if you have to. For this example, when you have played that first note and bent it up, don't release your finger completely. As you start your next note, just release this one off the fret, but keep your finger holding it to damp the note. Then ...


2

If you can achieve the bend without touching the D string, doing it very slowly, then you have a chance of practising that motion until you can do it at speed. Doing it slowly, you can experiment with the angle of your fingers, etc. I'm sure your guitar tutor and/or book goes into detail about proper fretting hand position, so I won't repeat it here. If ...


2

The notation for bending a note is a straight line connecting two notes or going off a note. A curved line, such as shown above, indicates a slur or legato (or phrase mark). Also, considering this is the first exercise of the book, it wouldn't make sense to have a note-bending exercise. This seems more of a warm-up. See this question for examples of what ...


2

Technically Fergus's answer which got no votes at all till my arrival was the most correct answer to the particular question asked; Lower notes have longer or heavier reeds, and thus more momentum to overcome for bending. That is only half the answer however. Bending is not about volume of air, over-blowing, or adjacent reeds as was mistakenly imagined for ...


2

What about an engineer who is into music : ) Lower pitched notes require more air on the harmonia. The "length" of their vibration is also larger (so lower frequency). This means you will be inhaling a greater voume of air to achieve the pressure difference required to reach the bend. This will usually be particularly noticeable on the first hole. Take a ...


2

This question is more suited to physics. stack exchange but here is a basic answer anyway... Lower notes correspond to greater vibrating mass. Newtons second laws tells us tells us that force is proportional to mass for a given acceleration. Force=mass x acceleration So a greater force is required to vibrate a lower pitched reed. However, there are many ...


2

Some very good tips, but one thing that I couldn't see mentioned is scale length and the relationship between string gauge and minimum action. There is no set scale length for guitars, but the most common ones are strat length at 25.5" and les paul at 24.75". On a longer scale guitar 9 gauge strings will be as tense as 10 are on a shorter scale. Another ...


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