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9

Since it's a full and isolated movement, that shouldn't be an issue. You can consider each movement as a single piece, and what's written in the first page of a piece is the full instrumentation required for that piece alone. This is common for symphonies and Opera, where some instruments or voices actually play only in some movements. Imagine having an ...


12

Would such a score cause confusion or turn away conductors? Absolutely not. Especially if it's the whole movement, nobody is going to be confused. But really, it's such a common practice, as is conductors' studying and marking up their scores beforehand, that there's really no reason to avoid it even within a single movement. Furthermore, there are ...


1

My mother was a ballet dancer and said that on one occasion the conductor was Thomas Beecham. She told me it was terrible - he only cared for the music and wasn't interested in the fact that dancers are constrained by things like gravity and mass. And that's the problem with ballet - the conductor is effectively just there to keep the orchestra in time with ...


5

TL;DR: Just skim the headings. The rest is sourced quotations supporting each point. Is the premise valid? Yes Few famous conductors have worked in dance with any frequency over the last half century. [1] Other quotations below support this as well. Limited control The conductor is often secondary to the choreographer and there may be multiple conductors ...


1

Well what an interesting question. At first I was unsure that it was actually the case but a quick survey of who conducts for various ballet companies and on various tours suggests - to me anyway - that the OP has a point. I think this will end up being too opinion based but my thinking is as follows. For most orchestral concerts the conductor is "top ...


-1

Since speculation appears in order for this question, I think there are a number of reasons, some more legit than others. First, conductors do program suites, excepts, and sometimes full acts from ballets in orchestra concerts. These are from scores of composers who are considered to have written "the best" ballets, e.g., Ravel, Prokofiev, ...


3

I was a professional orchestral musician and am a composer, so I can identify with your question. If say two weeks have passed and still no reaction, then it would be perfectly reasonable to send a short message asking for any critical response or suggestions regarding the piece that the conductor might have. Just get the ball rolling again. Other than ...


11

The English horn (in F) and the A clarinets have the expected transposed key signatures: concert B minor (two sharps) is written F♯ minor for the English horn (three sharps) and written D minor for the clarinets (one flat). The "B" instruments are B♭ instruments, denoted using the German system where B♭ is called "B" (B♮ is called "H&...


3

In general, the title of the person with ultimate responsibility for repertoire decisions is usually "music director" or "artistic director" or something similar. Specific reporting lines may vary. This person could report directly to the board, or might be subordinate to the executive director. Regardless, the executive director ...


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