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1

As a former string quartet professional, I'd also go with option two. Yes, it's the beat that matters, and this most clearly and simply conveys that. Regarding key, it depends on the sonority you want from the strings. Keys with lots of accidentals tend to somewhat mute the sound of the string instruments. This has to do with the sympathetic vibrations of ...


2

Option 2 for the tempo indication. It's the beat that matters. You're saying 'quqrter beat becomes dotted-quarter beat'. Probably what the players would assume, but good to spell it out. No, I wouldn't inflict 6 flats on a string quartet! In this age of free-ranging and even atonal music they are quite accustomed to playing any notes in any order at all. ...


6

I agree with @Dekkadeci that this option is a good option: That kind of change is common and easy to understand. @Caters Now regarding the key signatures. E♭ minor is fine on piano because it can fit the hands very well. But as you indicated it is not so nice on the strings. Why not make the whole thing a half step lower by changing the keys to D major and ...


7

I'd use your second option: metric modulation relative to the quarter note. With no notation at all, the unwritten convention I've witnessed is actually to assume a quarter note (or an eighth note, etc.) has the same tempo value throughout, so 2/4 to 6/8 does indeed have the duple meter feel slow down. On the other hand, at least there aren't many ...


14

The 4 indicates that the A is to be played using the fourth finger on the D string, while the 0 indicates that the A is to be played as an open string. Given the double stop in the fourth measure, I suspect this is to be played as a double stop as well, rather than as a divisi. So each second violinist will be playing the A on two strings simultaneously.


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