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3

Unfortunately, in practice your objective works the other way round. The following applies only to NotePerformer, because I don't have any experience with Sibelius Sounds. The individual instruments are certainly realistic enough to be easily identifiable by ear, but the software doesn't simulate the full range of timbre and dynamics that a professional ...


1

Articulation signs are signs indicating what kind of articulation the composer wants. He might not think about which technique the performer will apply. Martele is a technique that bowed string players can apply. If your sheet music has indications of which bow technique to use it is often the publisher's suggestion. I am both a string player and a ...


2

Thought about this for a while and finally came down on this division: You gotta start by breaking the entire set of sounds into groups. Usually called "range" When considering the frequency range we have to agree on some terms..but you probably have already heard them. Bass sounds are the lowest, Tenor is mid low, Altos are mid high and Sopranos are the ...


4

I would find a good recording of a work of one of those composers and get a printed full score. In many cases you can get these from imslp.org . Listen to the recording and follow in the score. Repeat this until you know what's going to come, before you hear it. This takes time and patience, but you can really gain an insight into the orchestration and ...


3

The simple answer is, if you can, join an orchestra (or concert band) yourself. Or, if you can't play yourself, sit in on some rehearsals (with a score or borrow a part) and pay attention. I seem to have absorbed this ability without even trying or even being aware of it. And, it probably only actually took about a 6 months to a year of weekly rehearsal ...


0

I am not too good in music, but, different instruments sound different due to their sound containing different amplitudes of frequencies [mainly harmonics, but also "fixed" ones e.g. due to a violin frame vibrating] in addition to the "nominal" one [ =the tone played, like the 440Hz A ] With the available computing power, I would be surprised unless you ...


13

Get an idea, how each instrument sounds separately (as covered in other answers) Train to read scores of ensembles with increasing number of instruments while listening. For orchestra pieces like symphonies start with smaller setting like Haydn. (Mahler, Berlioz, Wagner are a league above). Pieces with a singer are helpful (e.g. cantatatas and oratorios), ...


14

There are several compositions written in purpose to present the orchestra, the instrument sections and the single instruments to the audience and especially for children like Peter and the wolf (Sergej Prokofiev) and The young persons guide to the orchestra (Benjamin Britten). You may listen to any youtube videos, watching or only listening. a) camera ...


16

You begin by listening to individual instruments, to learn what they sound like, and the variations in their sound. Solo pieces, quartets, etc. are one way to do this. Searching Youtube for instrument tutorials is another. I got my start in instrument recognition with Piccolo, Saxo et Compagnie when I was about 3 years old. Then try recognizing instruments ...


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