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3

From experience, bass pedal notes must be relayed via a separate channel via woofer speakers that are not required to handle higher frequencies of manual stops. If a broad spectrum of sound is conveyed via a single speaker per channel, the bass pedal notes make the high frequencies "tizzy" due to intermodulation effects. In a pipe organ, pipes of ...


3

This seems to be inspired by guitar pitch-shift pedals, the best known being the DigiTech Whammy. Those, in turn, were mostly a means of augmenting the mechanical pitch bend abilities that an electric guitar has (both the “whammy” vibrato arm and direct finger-bending of strings). The digital implementation has both larger range and avoids detuning problems, ...


2

The tempo is adjusted to the acoustics of the room - faster for a dry room, slower in a wet (resonant) acoustic. Articulation helps - and a good set of reeds, which are extravagantly deployed in cathedral and basilica instruments. In English cathedrals, the organ is frequently on the 'screen' separating nave from the choir, essentially placing the organ in ...


2

You are the driver, you decide where and how to go! It sounds like it's someone's arrangement, and especially if it's a solo piece, you get to decide. You may want to revert to the original sound, you may decide to use a new one for the other part. It's up to you. If it's playing with others, it may be a different kettle of fish, and maybe the bandleader has ...


2

I haven't seen this type of notation before but it looks similar. My comments probably ramble as I and guessing what is meant. Your picture is similar to the "Rule of the Octave" which is an exercise in harmonizing ascending and descending scales. In this case, the text says that the scale is in the melody (seems useful to me; I harmonize melodies ...


2

My first thought was that 3 and 5 both meant root position (perhaps clarifying the soprano pitch). But this results in blatant parallel octaves in two spots: With the F–G–A soprano, the "IV 3" being in root position results in a simultaneous F–G–A bass. And we see something similar with the A–G–F soprano. Based on the other voice exchanges in ...


1

These are two different notations: arabic numbers refer to basso continuo roman numerals provide a hint of how to interpret basso continuo. Normally basso continuo is written together with the bass line. In this exercise the student is supposed to write the bass line and the other voices based on the soprano line, basso continuo numbers and hints from ...


1

As mentioned in leftaroundabout's answer, this seems to be replicating some of the pitch shift effects popularized by the Digitech Whammy (see the Effects section in the Whammy manual here). Here is a great article on the Guitar Gear Finder website which lists some of the best known songs which use the Whammy, and how to replicate them. Although this ...


1

As a special effect, some Hammond performers like Keith Emerson used to briefly turn off the tone-wheel motor during a solo. When they did this any held chord plunged down to 0 Hz as the tone-wheels stopped. Then when the motor restarted the held chord swooped back up from 0 Hz to audible again. I think your pedal is trying to emulate the behaviour of ...


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