19

Yes, you'll want to play E♭–F–E♭ before the final two sixteenth notes. My personal suggestion is more along the lines of: But some purists will insist on the rhythm of the D–E♭ being precisely as written, and therefore: This is where your own interpretation comes into play. I recommend listening to as many recordings of this opening as you can find; you'll ...


17

This is an Turn, an ornament consisting of four notes. The double-sharp symbol indicates that the lower note to be performed is a g double-sharp rather than a natural g, so the sequnce to be performed is b, a sharp, g double-sharp, a sharp.


14

This is called a turn. The 'basic' version would be written without the accidentals, and the player would play the first note, then quickly play one tone (note) above, the main note again, a tone below, the main note, and the resolve one the final note. The accidentals clarify exactly which notes to "twiddle" to. The turn can be either directly over a note,...


14

In fact, you can beam rests! I would go with: This is a clear modification of the "correct" beaming of your original example, which would be: Some of the comments below correctly state that beat 3 of my first example is not standard notation. Perhaps I went a bit crazy beaming all the rests, in which case you may prefer the following, more conservative ...


11

Yes it does affect it. The accidental always remains in effect for the remainder of that measure. However, if the two notes are of different octaves, the first accidental does not change the latter notes. If a G5 is sharped, for example, all remaining G5's of the measure will be sharped. G4's, G6's or G's of any other octave will be left natural. A natural ...


10

The first thing to realize is that notation and performance are different in Baroque, Classical, and Romantic music. The Romantic rules apply to Beethoven and later composers. The small squiggle (two zigs and two zags) means three notes, the first on the note, the second on the note a step higher (the "auxiliary note"), and the third on the note again. On ...


10

Both other answers overlook a crucial point. In Mozart (and contemporaries and earlier composers) trills should generally start on the upper note, which is the case here. However, many professional pianists do not know this and start on the lower note anyway. This is, historically, simply wrong. There are plenty of sources on this, for example CPE Bach’s ...


9

According to Bach's father's own Explication concerning the trills and ornaments, we are given a guide on how to interpret the trills. The Expliation was later expanded on by C.P.E. Bach. There is no question that an historically correct interpretation will start the trill on the upper auxiliary note (in this case the A). The ornament does not descent to an ...


9

Trills are (unfortunately) one of those things that only constant repetition will aid. Your body is not naturally used to the movements required for trills. When you constantly practice them, your brain will eventually pick up on the movements and it will become natural to you. Note, by "constant", I don't mean a two hour crash course session playing ...


9

There is nothing mysterious here. As you say, if it were slurred that would make it a tie, and that wouldn't make much sense in this setting. It all looks clear to me. Simply play the slashed Eb slightly before the beat and then start the trill on another Eb.


7

These are how to play it and variations. Note- the speed of the trill can be altered to suit the piece.


7

When the Mordent sign is used in front of the note it actually indicates a slide. If you can excuse the poor photo of the source material I think it can still be of some worth to you. It says the following... THE SLIDE. This is written as a Mordent sign before a note and consists of the two notes below the principal note taken consecutively, and leading up ...


7

There is no rule that says the turn has to go up one whole tone from the note you call the base. It can be a half tone or a whole tone. The turn follows the key signature unless something else is indicated. So in this case what you call the base note is A♯. If you follow the key signature then the next tone up from A♯ is B, so it should be B. And regarding ...


7

The convention for ornaments is that a sharp or flat will affect only the ornament, and not other notes within the measure. So in your example, any note written in the C space will be played as a C natural - but if there is a second mordent in the same measure, the C in that mordent will also be sharped without needing an additional accidental. This rule ...


6

In these sorts of cases, I trust the community of professional and semi-professional musicians more than my own music history knowledge. (Read: I searched youtube for several videos and saw what they did). For the uninitiated who stumble upon this question: a mordent is the proper name for the squiggle above the staff in measure 4. It is similar to a trill, ...


6

A little sharp below the turn sign:


6

I arrived at two reasons immediately: As part of ornamentation it is a clear indication, that a beginnner may skip the appogiatura without losing essential parts of the piece; informative in fast movements. (Ornamentation often being added added later by the score editor is somewhat more arbitrary in any case.) It is also a statement (unfortunately ...


6

I think you should definitely find some way to specify it, just so the performer knows exactly what is expected. Here are a few possible solutions, though I don't claim any of them are 100% factually correct with sources to back me up: I've seen editorial footnotes in scores of composers before Bach. If you think a footnote is the best bet, I don't ...


6

Take a look at the first edition: http://conquest.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/b/b1/IMSLP51972-PMLP01414-Beethoven_-_Piano_Sonata_No.3_(Artaria).pdf Inverted symbol but of course it's not an inverted turn. Now take a look at edition Casella 1919 http://conquest.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/8/81/IMSLP68708-PMLP01414-Opus_2_no_3.pdf The figure is to be ...


5

My advice: relax. You can't make a trill faster by straining; as soon as you notice you start straining, take a step back and begin slowly and relaxed again. I would advice against flicking, since this will induce unnecessary strains in your finger, and will not be a viable option in the long term. Another trick: my piano teacher always used to try and have ...


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