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36

In many live music contexts, musicians have the problem of hearing themselves clearly. Typically when playing loud, musicians are positioned behind the main speakers (heard by the audience) to avoid feedback, and for the safety of their own ears. In that basic scenario, musicians only hear: the quiet sound coming from their acoustic instruments or voices ...


14

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


9

As a sound technician for my church, one of the most important roles is making sure the musicians can hear themselves. This is done by controlling the levels in the monitors. Often, these sit on the stage and are called "Floor Monitors". These sit between the musicians and the crowed, and are pointed back at the performer.


8

So this guitar is quite a unique model, the John Lennon signature. Its pickup is not an acoustic-guitar pickup at all but, well, basically a standard high-impedance humbucker in small format. It's no big surprise then that it sounds more like an electric guitar: such a pickup, together with the cable capacitance, forms a 2nd order lowpass filter, and that ...


8

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of amps ...


8

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


7

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


7

Without precise time alignment, trying to provide bass from multiple sources could lead to interference patterns which would cause the low end sound to be way too loud in some parts of the room and almost nonexistent in others. Even if that weren't a problem, high passing the signal before sending it to the mains means that the mains have more power ...


6

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


6

Another term for monitoring is 'foldback', which sums it up quite nicely. The sound is re-routed via speakers- on stage or in ear,in order to be useful to each muso. Care needs to be taken that the mix given to each individual is not tainted by any other sound source.Drums and bass, for example, need to hear each other far more than , say keys, so the ...


5

I agree that looking at the future configuration you want is a good idea becuase that way you're not spending money on something now and then spending more to replace it later. From that point of view, one piece of advice is to imagine your ideal, complete PA system that you hope to have in the future. Then, when you want to add or change what you currently ...


4

Who told you you can't use you home PA? Sure enough, if you just plug the guitar right in a PA, it'll sound somewhat boring, but there's no reason you could not do it anyway. In fact, such a “super-clean” sound can IMO sometimes be a pleasant alternative. The thing is, guitar amps aren't designed to sound “good” in a HiFi sense, at ...


3

I do plenty of 'little' gigs on one speaker. And it's often pointing at me more than at the audience. Also consider this point: Some gigs have the audience sat down in rows with everyone wanting to hear every note clearly. On others you're a side-show. There need to be areas where those interested can get good sound. But there also need to be others ...


3

It depends. If you are outside then having two speakers will help in two ways: First, you need a lot more power outside than inside. The sound just goes and goes and never bounces off a back wall, so to get enough apparent loudness you usually need more watts. You also aren't getting any support from the ceiling, and grass usually absorbs more sound than a ...


3

Based on the scenario you described and the way you plan to use your system, I would recommend a Powered Speaker/Monitor/Portable PA. This Harbinger Vari V2212 600W 12-Inch Two-Way Class D Loudspeaker is available at Guitar Center in US for $199.99 US. It has 3 channels and will accept XLR or 1/4 inch line input and also RCA input. It has an XLR output ...


3

Are there different standards for XLR cabling? Yes. The XLR connectors has been used for a lot of different things. They were invented around 1950. In audio today it is mostly standardized, but vintage equipment may use the XLR connector in various ways. It was quite commonly used for connecting loudspeakers to power amplifiers. Today it is almost ...


2

Leaving aside questions of build quality, component quality, etc.: The answer is actually very simple. All audio reproduction systems have what we call an "operational range." This is the softest soft sound, up to the loudest loud sound, that the system can produce. Within this, there is something called the "linear operational range." This is the area ...


2

Several reasons: Size Matters Not: You write, "But I have observed that a 1000 watt speaker compared to a 500 watt speaker of the same size" (emphasis mine). It doesn't matter that the sizes are the same. The enclosure size is not always related to driver size, and driver size is not related to quality. Wattage isn't always what you think it is: You write, "...


2

The guitar amps you have most likely have some "effects" on them already. Most guitar amps allow you to select either a clean signal or a distorted overdrive signal (at living room levels). Also, many have built in reverb or delays or other effects that can be selected. But eventually, most guitar players end up wanting a sound they just can't get out ...


2

If your board has VU meters (input level meters), that would be a great way to determine if the mic is clipping your signal. If there is audible clipping before your meter indicates your signal is in the red or reaching 0dB then you know your mic is the problem, or the signal before the mic (which seems unlikely unless your amp is actually acting up). If the ...


2

Two options not mentioned so far are: Run another amp and cab offstage and mic that one. This does require a signal splitter, so you can get the tone you want on stage, while doing something different offstage. This doubles the kit, so can double your costs, as well as requiring somewhere to mic up that other amp... Use an attenuator (often called Power ...


2

It's somewhat dependent on what the speakers are for. One assumes p.a., for vocals. That will mean there's no great need, in smaller venues, for sub-woofers anyway. If it's for the whole band, a disco or suchlike, then sub-woofers are generally a separate entity in my experience in small venues. Mounting them in the same cabinets as other speakers makes the ...


2

Plug the mixer straight into the powered mixer, using one channel (or two if stereo). Plug whatever you need into the mixer, which I guess is a powered mixer amp., leaving the eq. flat on the powered mixer. It'll all work fine, I've used set-ups like this for years.


2

I started writing a long answer about the different responsibilities of the performer (make the sound you want the audience to hear) and the engineer (convey that sound as accurately as possible, using imperfect equipment in an imperfect space - and ALL equipment and spaces are imperfect to some extent). But it's not like that any more. Performer, ...


2

'connect my guitar to the PA system'. We don't know what type of PA system it is. It might be a real PA, or it could be a glorified home stereo. So we're going to have to make an assumption that it's a real (or at least semi-pro) PA, with XLR inputs for each channel. There are any number of multi-effect pedals out there, from a few dollars up to many-few ...


2

Guitar and voice are generally so tonally different it isn't really an issue. It depends a bit on playing style and guitar sound as well. I think for any singer songwriter an awareness of space is important. Check this out. Note that the guitar is well back in the mix, and he is often playing fills to his own vocal. This mirrors what good arrangers do - ...


1

If anything, you may run into the issue that the loop system is too quiet coming into your mixer, and has trouble getting loud enough. If that is the case, you should consider purchasing a tool called a DI box, that converts your 1/4 inch guitar cable into an XLR cable like a microphone (it does other things as well but that is the most obvious). This will ...


1

There should not be any problems but, just in case, the connection layout you may be looking for is: Guitar -> [IN]LoopStation[Out] -> PA Unless you plug an amplified signal to your PA or use incorrect speaker impedance, I cannot see why your system may get ruined. I hope these help ;)


1

You can. But with two, the coverage is far better - more than twice! And if a speaker goes down - dodgy socket, etc., what back-up is there? You never know how the speakers are going to be orientated, they may be 10m apart, or next to each other, but at 90 degrees. Using just the one seriously limits what you can do. On occasions, one may well suffice, so ...


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