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6

Obviously I'd echo Shevliaskovic's advice that seeing a doctor might be appropriate as no-one here is in the best position to give advice on an individual's medical issues. Personally, things I have found help with these kind of issues are : Lighter instruments, of course, as Neil Meyer mentions Ensuring that the way you have you strap set up allows your ...


5

I would avoid treating SYMPTOMS. If you have a nail in your shoe and it is impaling your foot, you can take the shoe off for a few weeks, take anti-inflammatory drugs and put a bandage on it. All these actions treat the symptom. The problem is when you put the shoe back on you still have a nail in your shoe. Take out the nail and the symptoms go away. ...


5

Your fretting hand should not make a 90 degree angle (at least not continuously), it may occasionally for some chords. More importantly: Does it bend 90 degrees towards you or away from you? If that seems ambiguous please try to describe the exact shape, or take a pic and post it. The wrist should be close to straight with a slight bend. Regardless of ...


4

If I understand, you do about 2-4 hours each day. That's a lot at the beginning. I think you should carefully gauge the level of pain/fatigue. The general idea is that you should not feel pain. Fatigue is different. Give yourself enough rest to recover from fatigue. If you feel actual pain, I think you should stop and assess what is going on. A while back ...


3

Height of seat in comparison to height of keys. If it's an electronic keyboard, it's easy to change the height. If it's an acoustic piano, not so! Elbows need to be slightly higher than hands, so the forearms are slightly dipping downwards from horizontal. This way, your fingers can be bent so the tips play the keys, more than the pads. Having said that, ...


3

First and foremost; Do not play sitting down on the couch, or slumped onto your bed and pillows. Your arms become trapped and immobile due to the restrictions of the structures of the offending furniture. In other words, stand up and play the guitar. Get a strap, and play standing, the way you will want to play when you are performing live, in front of ...


3

Be very aware of tension. I am a pianist also, and sometimes my worst issues come from things that have nothing to do with playing. For example, driving can cause great tension in my shoulders and arms due to the way I hold the steering wheel. Also, the way the arm rests are located, if I place my elbows on them they cause my shoulders to go up and my elbows ...


3

First, all notes must be played from the weight of the arm or from gravity. That eliminates the tension of playing down and gives you microseconds of relaxation on the up. Secondly, when you abduct your fingers (stretch/spread them out), they pull (vector force) on the flexor muscles in the forearm. Then when you flex your fingers, the tendon between ...


3

It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. It occurs when the median nerve is squished inside the carpal tunnel of your wrist, which can cause numbness. It is often due to exertion but most often due to curving your wrist too much. Look at the way you play. Your wrist should be bent as little as possible. If you use thumb-behind-the-neck technique the neck must be ...


3

One possibility: Examine under the nail with a very strong magnifying glass. I once managed to get a very short section of hair lodged under the end of a nail. This happened after I had a haircut. It is surprisingly uncomfortable if it irritates the nailbed. In my case, removing the tiny bit of hair cured the problem almost immediately.


3

6 or 7 hrs is a long gig! Check with your Musicians Union on the recommended length of playing time before breaks - and how long they can be. Another cause can be how low you sling your guitar. The higher the better for looking after backs, so if you have yours really low, as seems to be the current fashion, you'll be crouching to look at frets, and the ...


3

What you are experiencing could be what I would call an overuse injury caused by repetitive stress to muscles, tendons and joints without adequate rest for recovery. Many athletes experience this type of injury and it is often exacerbated by using improper form. But even if using proper form, continual stress without adequate recovery time can lead to a ...


3

I had bad posture for awhile and would often have tightness in my shoulders, back pain, and eventually developed tendinitis. I took a break from playing and when I started back up I raised the snare drum while keeping almost everything else the same. I raised it to the point that if I slouched down at all I would only hit the rim of the snare. This acted as ...


2

What to do while you're not playing I agree with the other answers that you should probably rest your hands for at least 2 weeks, then take it slow. 15 min first day, 30 min second day, no more than an hour for the first week or so of playing. If there's no pain, then you can relax these restraints. But this doesn't mean you should stop practicing! Now is ...


2

Product recommendations are out of order here, but let's think more in terms of which gauge. The highest, thus most tense string on a 12 string is the octave G. This is probably the one that will be tightest from an ordinary set. .007s are readily available, and what I've done is use one for that G. Rather than buy a set, which admittedly is chosen for its ...


2

If I can give any advice it probably is to go see a doctor. I suspect what you have is the following. I often get it when I grow my nails out to play finger picking with. Paronychia Paronychia is an infection of the tissues surrounding a fingernail or toenail. In most instances, the finger is infected by Staphylococcus aureus, a common staph bacteria, ...


2

You could for temporary only relief put something like Voltaren Emugel on the finger before the concert. Prescription in the US. Other things like Bengay or Tiger Balm would work but are more oily and not as easy to clean. Topicals like Voltaren can be useful as opposed to tablets (aspirin, Tylenol, ibuprofen, etc.) as they are less stressful on the stomach. ...


2

Yes, see a doctor. I'm not a doctor. But: It sounds like you may have either overuse or spasming of the muscle next to the spine. Try icing it immediately after the gig and then after a day or two applying a heat pad. Also get a theracane to gently massage the entire muscle along its length. You might consider a lighter guitar, like a Steinberger: or a ...


2

You're going to have to get out of what seems to be the habit of using your thumb to grip the neck too hard. This is a far too common an occurrence, and leads to your symptoms. It often ends in RSI., which as a guitar or bass player, you do not want! There seems to be something that tells us to squeeze hard on the back of the neck, particularly when playing ...


2

Consider lighter gauge strings, particularly for the unwound strings. I love the sound of 0.12's on a steel-string guitar but my hands are much happier using 0.10's or even a 'hybrid Slinky' type with 0.09 on the high E. Ultimately I place comfort ahead of sound.


2

I've had that kind of pain, and I know it's frustrating. I've had it as a piano player and from painting my house. For me it goes away eventually, and I haven't always had to stop the activity before it gets better. It might be from tightness due to stress. You probably had less stress when you were in college than you do now. Try feeling where you're ...


2

You are no doubt aware that your fingers are really just 'puppets' operated by the muscles in your forearm. Unless you spend most of your waking hours photocopying your palms, performing hand stands or working as a mime artist, you are unlikely to be used to stretching your hands out flat and spreading your fingers wide. Notice how when you're walking around ...


2

Try the same exercise, but at 7th and 10th fret (or any higher combination), and then move down one fret at a time when it no longer hurts your thumb. Also, ask your teacher why you need this exercise. Is it essential for the type of music you want to learn to play? (personal note: I've been playing bass for 40 years, and never bothered with this type of ...


2

Don't play the piano too long in the beginning. It's a process of building muscles just like in the fitness studio. You don't go there and start with 60kg on the first day just because you can, you have to go up step by step... In the beginning just start with 2 or 3 x 15 minutes a day, after you get used to it you can increase the time. Don't put 'too much ...


2

You should immediately stop playing as soon as something starts to hurt to prevent any serious injury. It is not necessary to stop playing for a long time, though. Just make sure to stop right away to prevent injury. Pain is an indicator that you are tensioning muscles which should be relaxed. Every finger should play independently, avoiding any 'help' ...


1

If the tips of your fingers are sore that is one thing. You will develop calluses. If your hand hurts, that is bad. You may be damaging your joints and this may lead to arthritis eventually. Your teacher may be a good musician but may not have a good knowledge of human physiology. The size and shape of people's hands and the lengths of their fingers are all ...


1

First and foremost, you are most likely trying to strangle the neck. Don't pull on the back so much with your thumb. Secondly, stretching isn't that necessary on bass. What's wrong with sliding your hand along? Thirdly, you need to be asking your teacher, and if they convince you it's all needed, all well and good, listen. But actually, that stretch isn't ...


1

Well, the body do need to built strength. So if you started playing 3 months ago and "jumped" into playing 1-2 hours a day that could be a reason for some pain, so the teacher could have a point. At least I can say that if you are only getting this pain when playing the piano it seems obvious that it is related to the piano playing and therefore there is ...


1

If it hurts, stop! General principle. The problem is usually too much, too soon. Try rolling chords you can't reach. In any case, the Philip Isidor piano technique book has some good exercises you can practice to SLOWLY increase your flexibility and strength. If you really did hurt yourself, don't keep re-injuring it. Use some tiger balm and rest.


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