16

It's because of the pseudo-compression that using distortion effect gives. The same will be true if you use a clean channel with a compressor, or if your amp has a natural compressing effect, as many do. What's happening is... You play a chord normally: You get quite nice mid-range strum of the strings, nothing surprising there. You play a palm muted ...


13

I'm not a harp player, but it appears that this is done with the harp equivalent of prepared piano on a few strings. About four or five strings of the harp appear to have some kind of putty attached to them: At least one of the strings in the higher range is "prepared" in the same way. This would certainly affect the timbre and resonance of the ...


5

I imagine when your palm is muting the strings, you are picking them from a different angle or using a different muscle in your arm or wrist that is supplying more energy to the attack. When you attack with your pick deeper in the strings, it tends to be generally louder because it takes more energy for your hand to pull the pick across.


5

I see two options here. (The third one would be changing your hand position, but you've tried that already and it doesn't work). One would be to see if you really need to move your pick so deep into the strings. I play a Strat and when I palm mute, my pick is also right above the middle pick up but I rarely touch it because my pick doesn't go that deep. The ...


4

I couldn't play the audio file, but comments say it's an acoustic guitar with the muting on the neck. If the piano was a grand and you could reach inside, you could brush your fingernail across the strings with the dampers down. That would sort of mechanically duplicate what's happening with the guitar. The sound would be similar. You wouldn't be able to ...


4

The obvious answer is practice (as it usually is) but you can use various techniques to make things easier. One useful trick to limiting muting to just the bass strings is to mute right at the bridge, and rest the side of your palm on the bridge itself. You can then place your hand in a way that moves the contact position on the top three strings behind the ...


3

Holding the pick just between thumb and one finger gives enough movement to play across two or three strings without moving the part of the palm that is muting. If you move, say, to the top three strings, then slide the whole hand downwards so that the palm mute part of your hand is over those strings. When you move to the E, A and D strings, slide the ...


2

In my opinion it is completely unavoidable to palm mute and play by moving only the forearm. Besides I would argue that it is not a good idea to play entirely by moving the forearm anyway. A better idea would be to combine movement of the forearm, wrist and flexing the pick between your forefinger and thumb - it is hard to teach this over the internet, ...


2

I daresay the easiest way to get this kind of thing up to speed is to stick to consequent alternating picking. Of course it needs practise, but... that's sometimes inevitable when you want to go fast... Another approach that's in principle more economical would be raking technique (or do guitarists call this sweeping?) – you play two notes on adjacent ...


2

If it has to be a "real" keyboard-type sound, use an overdriven Hammond, and play fast cluster chords, alternating with both hands like the keyboard was a conga drum. A Rhodes or clavinet type sound might also work, but make the chords noisy and overdriven/distorted. However, that's going to sound a bit aggressive. You could also use sampled or synthesized ...


2

Muting on bass is a bit of an art, and it's hard to come up with absolute rules as to how it should be done. The most common techniques are: as you say, using your thumb to mute lower strings gently lifting your left hand finger but leaving it in contact with the string when the note has finished using the fleshy bits of your left hand fingers to mute ...


1

Bass muting often isn't simple - it helps to have more than one trick. In this case I would try various combinations of trying to mute the A string a bit with the finger that I'm using to fret the F stretching out my little ('pinky') finger to mute the A string further down the string using a finger on the right hand to mute the A string. As you guessed, ...


1

Concerning the tabs and the second video example, note that Paul Gilbert spent his whole life perfecting his picking technique, so it shouldn't come as a surprise that playing his stuff is very challenging, especially for the picking hand. For that riff to sound good you definitely need to use alternate picking (as he does), not raking/sweeping. The latter ...


1

Some stuff is too fast to just use downstrokes. I will assume that you play metal, the technique isn't used very much outside of those genres. Then one thing to consider is string gauge. It might seem intuitive to have thick strings to pound away on, but a lot of metal players actually use quite thin strings. Then palm muting will be easier both up and ...


1

Its tricky, I need to alter my palm mute hand shape and finger position for picking depending on what sound I want. Just play around and experiment until your get the right sound for the most comfort, this will change depending on what your doing & make sure your not tensing your muscles. (If I learn something new I have to repeatedly and consciously ...


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